Human Expression

Students will develop the ability to:

  1. Explain how works of human expression shape personal and cultural values and identities, and increase empathy.
  2. Appraise the philosophical, literary, aesthetic, or linguistic expressions of the human condition in terms of alternative, ambiguous, or contradictory perspectives.
  3. Critically investigate enduring and contemporary issues of human experience through the lens of creative expression.
  4. Create or interpret works of art (literature, visual arts, or performing arts).
  5. Construct or evaluate ideas or questions that challenge assumptions.
  6. Engage in the creative process, with emphasis on risk-taking and innovation.

Courses:

  •  ARC 201 Introduction to American Architecture (3 credits) 
  • ART 105 Survey of Art History I: Ancient through Renaissance Art (3 credits) 
  • ART 106 Survey of Art History II: Modern Art (3 credits) 
  • ART 111 Drawing I (3 credits) 
  • ASL 101 Elementary American Sign Language I (3 credits) 
  • COM 160 Intercultural Communication (3 credits) 
  • DST 110 Deaf Culture (3 credits) 
  • ENG 217 Writings from the Margins of Contemporary American Literature (3 credits) 
  • ENG 230 Film (3 credits) 
  • ENG 233 Beginning Poetry Writing (3 credits) 
  • ENG 251 World Literature I (3 credits) 
  • ENG 252 World Literature II (3 credits) 
  • ENG 253 English Literature I (3 credits) 
  • ENG 254 English Literature II (3 credits) 
  • ENG 255 American Literature Precolonial to 1865 (3 credits) 
  • ENG 256 American Literature Post Civil War to Present (3 credits) 
  • ENG 257 Contemporary African-American Women's Writing (3 credits) 
  • ENG 259 Native American Novels (3 credits) 
  • HST 265 Immigration and Ethnicity in American History (3 credits) 
  • HUM 150 Ecoliteracy, Education and Society (3 credits) 
  • HUM 157 Old Testament (3 credits) 
  • HUM 160 The Criminal in Literature and the Arts (3 credits) 
  • HUM 264 An Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar on the Holocaust (3 credits) 
  • PHL 101 Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)