Computer Information Systems

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

CIS 105 : Hardware Fundamentals

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of computer hardware that lay a foundation for their other courses in computers. Students develop an understanding of the fundamentals involved in buying, building and maintaining a computer. One class hour per week. Competency met: Critical Thinking Fall, Spring

Credits

1
  1. Understand and apply a basic understanding of hardware that is a framework for many other courses in CIS/CIT.
  2. Develop an understanding of the decisions that need to be made when buying a computer to meet specific needs.
  3. Develop an understanding of what is involved in building and maintaining a computer.

CIS 106 : Operating System Scripting

This course teaches the student how to plan, write, and debug scripts for the purpose of automating operating system tasks. Topics include use of parameters, string comparison testing, piping, input and output redirection, file manipulation, use of environmental variables, looping, if tests, running a script from a script, and using shift. One hour of lecture per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

1

Prerequisites

CIS 121 with a grade of C or better

Corequisites

CIS 120, or permission of the instructor.

  1. Design, develop, test and document batch files to effectively solve computer related problems.
  2. Effectively generate and control batch-file messaging.
  3. Successfully manipulate data extracted from either a command or a text file within a batch file.
  4. Implement IF/Then logic to control the flow of a batch file.
  5. Select and utilize the appropriate loop control to solve a problem which requires repetition.
  6. Identify and use at least three methods to schedule/automate a batch file.

CIS 110 : Basic Computing Skills

Students are introduced to computers and to business applications with emphasis on applications and Windows Explorer. Students learn to use applications individually and to use multiple applications to develop a project. Students learn to use email effectively and to do research on the Internet using multiple browsers and their advanced features. Students will use the Microsoft Windows operating system and the current version of Microsoft Office. This course is designed for students with no prior computing experience and is not part of any CIS options. It is not open to students who have successfully completed or currently enrolled for credit in CIS 111. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
  1. Utilize basic computer skills to navigate the computer, Windows Explorer, as well as complete basic computer tasks.
  2. Utilize email effectively as a means of professional business communication.
  3. Apply effective methods of searching online to conduct course related research.
  4. Successfully create and make basic modifications to documents, spreadsheets, and presentations.
  5. Work with and understand the business purpose and basic application of a database program.

CIS 111 : Introduction to Business Information Systems

This course deals with fundamental computer concepts applicable to business and management, including software, problem solving, case studies, business models, and computer systems analysis and design, as well as basic computer applications. Students will use the Microsoft Windows operating system and the current version of Microsoft office. Students will learn to work with a spreadsheet, a database management system, word processing and presentation software and to apply these skills to the functional areas of organizations. Case studies will be drawn from accounting, finance, marketing, information systems, operation management, and other areas of business. Students learn how to use the Web successfully to research information. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
  1. Utilize email effectively as a means of professional business communication.
  2. Apply effective methods of searching online to conduct course related research.
  3. Effectively create and/or modify business professional documents, spreadsheets, presentations and databases to accomplish business goals.
  4. Utilize case studies and/or business models to enhance problem solving skills through course related assignments.
  5. Apply the skills necessary to prepare for core business classes as well as real-life business situations.
  6. Work independently as well as collaborate with others in arriving at applicable solutions.

CIS 112 : Advanced Business Information Systems

This course includes an in-depth study of a spreadsheet package, including its database and graphic capabilities, and its logical functions and macro capabilities. A study of a leading word processing package, including its graphic/desktop-publishing features is included. Students work with an integrated office package and learn how to convert, link, and embed data between the word processor and spreadsheet programs. Other business applications are included. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

3
  1. Use advanced document, spreadsheet, and database programs as a means to accomplish business professional goals.
  2. Enhance word documents by applying advanced techniques.
  3. Successfully apply advanced techniques to the creation of a complex spreadsheet.
  4. Successfully apply logical functions and automate repetitious activities via the use of macros within applicable business applications.
  5. Convert, link, and embed data between a word processor and spreadsheet program.
  6. Gain the skills necessary to prepare for real-life business situations.

CIS 113 : Hospitality Management Information Systems

This course will give the student basic computer skills in operating systems, word processors and spreadsheets. In addition, the student will learn to use the Internet as a tool for searching and for e-mail. The student will be introduced to the wide variety of support software that is available to automate many functions that must be performed. The student will learn to evaluate the functions and processing in hospitality software packages and to make knowledgeable decisions about these packages. The student will work hands-on with software packages to better understand their functions and capabilities. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

3
  1. Understand the tremendous impact of technology on the hospitality industry and how this great, driving force can be used for competitive advantage in the hospitality industries.
  2. Use end user applications to produce various documents that assist in management.
  3. Work with a variety of computer essentials that are important to the hospitality business.
  4. Analyze networking and security needs and their impact on the processes within a hospitality organization, specifically food services.
  5. Work with and understand the impact of e-commerce on the hospitality industry and the use of the Internet to promote restaurant businesses.
  6. Understanding the impact of different management systems in hospitality.
  7. Work with technology to develop critical thinking skills and develop the skills needed to grow with technology within the hospitality industry.

CIS 115 : Introduction to Cybersecurity

Information is the new gold standard in the digital economy. Students will explore the dark side of the Internet in this immersive introductory course on cybersecurity. Students will learn about the value of information, types of cyber threats and attack vectors, how to recognize and mitigate cyber threats, and how to deploy common defense mechanism to safeguard sensitive information. The course will also explore the social media phenomena, privacy laws, how to stay safe on the Internet, and the future of cybersecurity and its societal impact. Three lecture hours per week. , Fall

Credits

3
  1. Students will be able to:
  2. Apply standard statistical inference procedures to draw conclusions from data.
  3. Identify the bad actors in cyberspace and compare and contrast their resources, capabilities/techniques, motivations, and aversion to risk.
  4. Describe different types of attacks and their characteristics.
  5. Describe their responsibilities related to the handling of information about vulnerabilities.
  6. Describe potential system attacks and the actors that might perform them.
  7. Describe cyber defense tools, methods and components.
  8. Apply cyber defense methods to prepare a system to repel attacks.
  9. Describe appropriate measures to be taken should a system compromise occur.
  10. List the applicable laws and policies related to cyber defense and describe the major components of each pertaining to the storage and transmission of data.

CIS 115 : Introduction to Cybersecurity

Information is the new gold standard in the digital economy. Students will explore the dark side of the Internet in this immersive introductory course on cybersecurity. Students will learn about the value of information, types of cyber threats and attack vectors, how to recognize and mitigate cyber threats, and how to deploy common defense mechanism to safeguard sensitive information. The course will also explore the social media phenomena, privacy laws, how to stay safe on the Internet, and the future of cybersecurity and its societal impact. Three lecture hours per week. , Fall

Credits

3

CIS 120 : Programming: Logic, Design and Implementation

This course teaches the fundamentals of programming logic, design and implementation. Students learn to think logically and design programs. Examples are implemented in several languages giving students an understanding of how languages work to implement the programmer's logic and design. Students with no programming background are strongly encouraged to take this course before pursuing other languages. Three class hours per week. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Technical Literacy (8.0), First Year Experience (9.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
  1. Demonstrate the development of a basic appreciation of the logic and art of programming.
  2. Choose logic development strategies and demonstrate the ability to analyze problems and create logical solutions using problem solving strategies, tools and techniques.
  3. Construct the basic structure of a program including sequence, selection, repetition and modules and will be able to design and construct programs using these structures and using a variety of languages and tools.
  4. Construct and manage module development using visual tools to design and construct examples of logic and processing and will evaluate the results.
  5. Recognize a variety of methods for storing data as well as design and construct basic, effective data storage.
  6. Design, construct and manage the start of a portfolio web site.
  7. Understand and implement college success strategies.

CIS 121 : Operating Systems

This course gives students an understanding of popular computer operating systems. The operating systems covered include Windows and Linux. The course leads students through basic and advanced file management tasks from a command line interface as well as from a graphical interface. Topics are covered from both an end-user and an administrative standpoint. Topics covered include hard disk management, desktop security awareness, and system configuration. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall, Spring, Summer.

Credits

3
  1. Use the command line to manage the file system using both absolute and relative paths.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to properly read a command syntax.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of the search path.
  4. Create and execute simple command macros and simply batch files with and without the use of parameters.
  5. Create and remotely access shared folders using a UNC path to a shared resource.
  6. Understand the essential differences between Windows and Linux command syntax.
  7. Describe the type of attacks that are launched against a desktop computer and the defenses that can be set up to protect it.

CIS 122 : Internet Developer

The course emphasizes the technical design, development, and implementation of effective Web sites, and students learn what makes a Web site work effectively. The course teaches XHTML, HTML, and CSS and introduces JavaScript. It also introduces software to develop and maintain web sites. Students develop and maintain their own web sites using these development techniques. In addition, students learn to work effectively with Internet navigation, access tools, and analyze the techniques to attract viewers to their web sites. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall; Spring.

Credits

3
  1. Effectively use the Internet to access the tools and information to assist in creating a web presence to meet complex requirements.
  2. Design a web site with the flow and design to effectively meet client needs.
  3. Develop, and maintain an effective web site using the current version of HTML and CSS.
  4. Implement basic programming techniques of sequence, selection and repetition using JavaScript which will allow for interactivity and decision responses at the web site.

CIS 123 : Object-Oriented Concepts

This course is an introduction to the use of object-oriented concepts for software development. It prepares students for the CIS 157 Object-Oriented Java Programming course. The course concentrates on objects and discusses very little Java syntax. It discusses the object-oriented paradigm in detail with particular emphasis on classes, objects, and the use of objects in user applications and applets. The course introduces encapsulation, inheritance, arrays of objects, and polymorphism. Students learn how to design classes and display the interaction of objects in visual form using the Unified Modeling Language. The course introduces several concepts from procedural programming such as primitive data types, assignment, conditionals, and repetitive loops. Three class hours per week. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Technical Literacy (8.0), First Year Experience (9.0) Fall

Credits

3
  1. Compare the object-oriented model to the procedural programming model.
  2. Become comfortable with the difference between a class and an object.
  3. Understand how actual arguments are passed to the formal parameters of methods.
  4. Learn how to design Java classes using UML.
  5. Apply object oriented concepts in the design of a small application system.

CIS 128 : Introduction to Digital Audio Recording

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of computer technologies to create audio productions for business, multimedia, and other applications. Students explore popular software applications, hardware and software compatibility, and understand their uses for MIDI programming and digital recording. By creating soundtracks, optimized voice-over recordings, and other projects, students develop an understanding of sound recording technology. Three class hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

3
  1. Understand and implement the basics of creating digital audio recordings.
  2. Understand and apply the fundamentals of software applications used in sound recording technology.
  3. Develop skills to create a basic recording.
  4. Research the importance of audio in business, multimedia and other applications.

CIS 131 : Windows Server Administration I

In this course students will learn to administer a Windows network from a Windows Server. The class will focus on managing user accounts, group accounts, folders, files, and object security. They will learn to secure network resources with shared folder permissions and NTFS permissions. Students will also implement user profiles, user logon scripts and setup and administer network printing. Students will be provided with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform post-installation and day-to-day administration tasks in a Windows Client-Server-based network. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 121 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

CIS 121 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Differentiate between types of networks and know their respective advantages.
  2. Use and customize Microsoft Management Console.
  3. Administer Active Directory: Create and manage Active Directory Accounts.
  4. Differentiate between local and domain accounts.
  5. Create and manage Group Policies.
  6. Administer Profiles, local and roaming.
  7. Establish Shared folders and printers and properly configure the security of each.

CIS 132 : Introduction to UNIX/Linux and Shell Programming

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of the UNIX/Linux operating system and shell programming. It provides an overview of the history of UNIX/Linux and an explanation of operating systems. The course covers in detail basic commands, the vi editor, the file structure, the shell environment, and shell scripts. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 121 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

CIS 121 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Login to a Unix/Linux system using secure shell and execute bash shell commands or shell scripts from the prompt, including the use of filename substitution.
  2. Create, change to, and remove directories using absolute and relative path names.
  3. Modify file and directory permissions from the command line.
  4. Define standard in, standard out and standard error and apply their use with redirection or piping at command line or in a shell script.
  5. Create and execute a shell script that properly applies the use of various shell looping and decision statements.
  6. Create, modify and use system variables.
  7. Create regular expressions to be used with applicable shell commands.

CIS 133 : UNIX/Linux System Administration I

This course covers the installation, administration and maintenance of a UNIX/Linux file server. The required hardware, system and network configurations will be discussed. Both LAN and WAN connections to the server will be covered before the installation procedure is presented in detail. Starting, controlling and shutting down the server will be covered, and each student will have hands on experience with their own server. User administration, as well as the UNIX/Linux file system organization and security features, are introduced after the student servers are functioning on the network. Process, mail management and performance tuning issues are also discussed near the end of the course. The course will use a computer lab where each student will have individual access to a UNIX/Linux server. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 132 with a C or better or permission of the instructor.

  1. Install a Linux Operating System.
  2. Locate and use Help Resources in the Linux System.
  3. Effectively use Linux commands at the bash shell to manage users, groups, file system security, cron, sudo and to install packages.
  4. Use YaST to manage system components of the Linux Operating System including network settings and print servers.
  5. Share and secure shared folders on a server by configuring NFS Server and NFS client.
  6. Configure and manage NIS.

CIS 134 : Networking Technologies

This course introduces students to data communications and networking concepts as they relate to both local and wide area networks. The framework for the lectures is the OSI reference model. It presents data translation, transmission media, and data transmission as well as network structures, topologies, physical layouts, and communication protocols. The course discusses the popular protocol stacks, firewalls, name resolution, and proxy servers. It discusses in detail the Internet and IP addressing. It also covers the material in the current CompTIA Network+ Exam. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall, Spring

Credits

4
  1. Define and compare local area (LAN) and wide area (WAN) networks and the commonly used protocols and hardware for each.
  2. Define and compare the different types of switching methodologies used in data transmission.
  3. Identify the basic networking elements and describe the roles of clients, servers, peers, transmission media and protocols.
  4. Describe the physical characteristics of coaxial cable, STP, UTP, and fiber-optic media.
  5. Define the seven layers of the OSI reference model, how the layers interact, the purpose of each layer and the relationship between the OSI reference model and computer network protocols.
  6. Explain basic data transmission concepts, including full duplexing, attenuation, latency, and noise.
  7. Describe the physical characteristics of coaxial cable, STP, UTP, and fiber-optic media.
  8. Design a unique TCP/IP networks, including subnetting, CIDR, and address translation.

CIS 148 : Programming in C#

This course introduces the object-oriented programming language C#. Students learn to write programs to solve practical problems and work in the Visual Studio environment. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 120 recommended.

  1. Understand and effectively use object oriented programming concepts.
  2. Work effectively in the Visual Studio environment.
  3. Design, develop and implement programs in the C# language.

CIS 150 : Oracle and SQL

This course is an introduction to the Oracle data base. Students will learn to work with Oracle and the structured query language SQL as they design, manipulate and access the data base. In addition, the concepts and design of relational databases will be analyzed and implemented. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

3
  1. Understand the concepts and logic behind the development of a normalized relational database.
  2. Work with a basic set of data and an analysis of the data needs to create a normalized relational database.
  3. Create a database and tables with keys to store and maintain data.
  4. Generate SQL to query and maintain the database with a wide variety of criteria.
  5. Use the structured query language SQL to access information in one or more tables within the database.
  6. Write code using the Oracle Procedural Language SQL (PL/SQL) to enable the handling of more complex data manipulation problems.

CIS 152 : Database Programming and Management with Access

This course teaches students the concepts of a relational database system. Students learn to work with a variety of Access components including Structured Query Language and Data Access Objects. Students analyze, design, develop, manage, and execute projects in this powerful database environment. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

3
  1. Understand and use the concepts and logic behind the development of a normalized relational database.
  2. Work with a basic set of data and an analysis of the data needs to create a normalized relational database.
  3. Work effectively within the Microsoft Office Environment using Access.
  4. Create a database and tables with keys to store and maintain data.
  5. Work with the Access user interface manipulate and query data.
  6. Work with SQL and scripting to manipulate and query data.

CIS 153 : Python

Python is a widely used interpretive, open source programming language. It has a simple syntax a lot of libraries and is widely used for web, business and scientific applications. The course covers the basics of Python so students can effectively use it to solve problems. Three lecture hours per week. , Fall

Credits

3
  1. Apply logical analysis to layout a programming solution using a variety of programming tools.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to implement logic and design concepts to write successful code using Python.
  3. Work effectively in the Python environment.
  4. Debug any problems that occur.
  5. Write code to work with data collections.

CIS 155 : Introduction to C++ Programming

Based on the C programming language, C++ is an improved version of C that takes the C language to the next evolution of programming languages. Proper program design using structured programming techniques is emphasized, as well as the C++ syntax. The course covers data basics, C++ operators, loops, branching, function, arrays, pointers, structures, and file processing. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

3
  1. Demonstrate basic understanding of the C++ programming language.
  2. Grasp the building blocks of a C/C++ program including the use of variable definitions, data types, functions, scopes and operators.
  3. Understand the difference between procedural and object-oriented programming.
  4. Work and become productive in Integrated Development Environment, using compiler, linker and debugger.
  5. Explore various features of the command-line environment, including redirection and piped I/O.

CIS 156 : Visual Basic

This course will cover object-oriented Visual Basic. The student is taught to analyze a programming problem, design a logical solution, and write and execute the program using Visual Basic. The course will emphasize the strengths of Visual Basic and its wide variety of uses as well as covering a wide range of programming applications. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

3
  1. Students who successfully complete Visual Basic will be able to:
  2. Work within a basic object oriented programming environment as implemented in the latest version of Visual Basic
  3. Work effectively in the Visual Studio environment
  4. Implement logic and design concepts to develop a computerized solution to a posed problem.
  5. Design, write, execute and debug programs using Visual Basic.
  6. Write Visual Basic programs that access and maintain data in a relational database

CIS 157 : Object-Oriented JAVA Programming I

The course covers basic concepts in programming and an introduction to the object paradigm. It introduces the concepts of the object paradigm and teaches students how to design and implement simple programs in an object-oriented language. The course also covers the basics of using computers and basic software tools to develop programs. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. Competency Met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CIS 123 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

CIS 123 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Install and configure the Java development environment.
  2. Use the syntax of Java object-oriented language to write applications.
  3. Analyze a problem and design and develop a logical solution that can be implemented in Java.
  4. Develop an understanding of the object-oriented techniques.
  5. Define, create, and use objects and object communication.
  6. Work with Java collections and generics.

CIS 158 : Introduction to Procedural Programming

Procedural Programming (C/C++) under Unix. Data types, variable declarations, arithmetic expressions, conditional statements, macros, function prototypes, standard libraries, file processing, pointers, structures, unions and dynamic memory management are discussed. Unix file system, shell scripts, input/output redirection, piping, programming with standard I/O and Unix system calls will be covered. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall, Spring

Credits

4
  1. Login to a Unix/Linux system using secure shell and execute bash shell commands or shell scripts from the prompt including the use of filename substitution.
  2. Create, change to and remove directories using absolute and relative path names.
  3. Create and use a function using the C programming language.
  4. Create and execute make file to compile one or more C programs into binary.
  5. Create C functions that properly apply the use of various shell looping and decision statements.
  6. Create C functions that use pointers for variable and array access.

CIS 159 : MySQL and PHP

Students in this course learn to work with the open source database MySQL. They learn the concepts of creating a relational open source database using standard query techniques, including SQL and PHP and maintaining the database using SQL and PHP. Three class hours per week. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

3
  1. Work with a basic set of data and an analysis of the data needs to create a normalized relational online database.
  2. Create a database and tables with keys to store and maintain data working through SQL and the MySQL database.
  3. Generate SQL to query the database with a wide variety of criteria.
  4. Effectively integrate SQL into PHP programs to handle the database manipulation and maintenance.
  5. Create and maintain an interactive website using PHP.
  6. Design, develop, execute, debug and maintain web based programs using PHP.

CIS 160 : The Microcomputer Environment

This course covers the operating system requirements for the CompTIA A+ certification. It concentrates on file and memory management using the diagnostic and troubleshooting tools available in the operating systems covered. The course also covers installation, configuration, and upgrading of the three operating systems. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 121 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

CIS 121 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Compare and contrast the features and requirements of various operating systems, including Windows and Linux.
  2. Install or upgrade and configure each operating system using the most appropriate method.
  3. Implement security best practices to secure a client workstation.
  4. Setup, configure and troubleshoot Windows networking on a client/desktop and secure SOHO wire and wireless network.
  5. Troubleshoot hard drives and RAID arrays, common video and display issues, operating system problems, and common security issues using appropriate tools and best practices.
  6. Install and configure basic applications on the workstation.

CIS 162 : Applications for Web Development

This course provides students with advanced Web theory and graphics. Students will learn how to analyze the needs and desires of the client or company as related to its Web presence and translate these objectives and goals into appropriate Web architecture. Students will also explore e-commerce issues relevant to this design. Students will work with software packages for graphics and Web page creation and learn to implement the graphic and interactive needs into the Web architecture. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIT 131, or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

CIT 131, or permission of instructor.

  1. Perform a needs analysis for a client and translate client needs into the site architecture.
  2. Identify copyright infringement and the importance of abiding by copyright laws.
  3. Work with software packages and tools to implement graphic and photo enhancements as well web development.
  4. Identify and implement an attractive design that is appropriate for the site audience.
  5. Identify usability concerns and implement solutions.
  6. Implement optimization techniques to maximize search engine placement.

CIS 231 : Windows Server Administration II

In this course the student will install and configure a Windows server. Topics will include Network Protocols, Active Directory and Dynamic Host Configuration Services. Students will learn how to install and configure network services on the server, manage partitions, and to create and administer system policies. Other topics covered include auditing system resources and events, using Windows Diagnostics and monitoring system performance. Students will be provided with the knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure and maintain a Windows server in a Windows based network. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 131 with a C or better or permission of the instructor.

  1. Install and configure a multiple server, multiple client Microsoft-domain-based network.
  2. Use Sysprep to create a default user profile.
  3. Install and configure DHCP Services in the domain.
  4. Configure a Windows server as a NAT router.
  5. Manage a DNS database.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to troubleshoot domain and network related problems.
  7. Use group policies to deploy printers and software.
  8. Install and configure remote desktop and terminal services.

CIS 232 : Unix/Linux System Administration II

This courses builds on the Linux server and Linux client administration skills learned in previous coursework. After installing a Linux server, students manage network services. These include DNS, DHCP, file and print services, Web services, director services, and firewall services. Samba server and Samba client is installed and configured to allow Linux and Windows computers to share resources. Students also install and configure Apache Web server on a Linux server and learn to administer the Web server. Firewall services and LDAP are installed and configured to allow secure access to services. Four hours of lecture per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CIS 133 and CIS 231 both with a grade of C or better, or permission of the instructor.

  1. Install and configure a DHCP Sever and DHCP Client.
  2. Configure a Linux machine as a NAT router.
  3. Install and configure a DNS server and DNS Client using BIND.
  4. Install and configure NFS and SAMBA file share.
  5. Install and configure Network Printing using CUPS.
  6. Install and configure OpenLDAP on a Linux Server.
  7. Establish cross platform authentication between Linux and Windows server and client computers.
  8. Install and configure Apache Web Server.
  9. Installing and configuring OpenLDAP on a Linux Server.
  10. Configuring ipchains and iptables to implement a firewall.
  11. Install and configure a DHCP Sever and DHCP Client.

CIS 233 : Routing and Router Configuration

This course provides an in-depth examination of routing and router configuration as used on WANs and, specifically, the Internet. The course covers layers 2, 3, and 4 of the OSI Model. Students gain the basic knowledge to plan, implement, and control routers connecting several networks using a variety of protocols. TCP/IP and the protocols used to run and manage today's routers is covered in depth as well as commands used to implement, configure, and manage these protocols. Four hours of lecture per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CIS 134 with a C or better or permission of the instructor.

  1. Describe the basic structure of a routing table including summary and default routes and how these are used to determine the best path to forward a packet.
  2. Describe the relationship between router interfaces, directly connected networks, and the routing table.
  3. Describe the role of dynamic routing protocols metrics and which metric types are used by several dynamic routing protocols.
  4. Devise, compute and apply subnetting schemes using CIDR and VLSM standard in making efficient use of scarce IPv4 addresses.
  5. Describe the designate router and backup designated backup router process in multi-access networks.

CIS 250 : Interactive Websites

In this course, students create interactive Web sites using a variety of software that is current in the field. Web development is growing and changing with a wide variety of programming languages and frameworks being developed. Students will work with a variety of languages and tools as they develop sites. Students will also work with server-side data storage and retrieval. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 120 and CIS 122 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Students who successfully complete Interactive Web Sites will be able to:
  2. Develop interactive web sites using a variety of scripts and/or languages (currently Perl/CGI or ASP)
  3. Develop interaction with databases using different structures
  4. Develop websites that can be used on desktops, pads, and mobile devices, etc.
  5. Work with data exchange through XML or similar methodologies
  6. Work with protocols that govern web communication

CIS 255 : C++ Object Oriented Programming

C++ is a widely used programming language for application development. In this course, the students learn a language that has many practical uses in the real world. The course introduces C++ syntax and functions not found in the traditional C. The fundamental concepts of the object oriented paradigm are introduced and object oriented programming is stressed in place of traditional structured programming. Object arrays, pointers to objects, and linked lists of objects are the focus of the class. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 155 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Create C++ programs that make use of C++ classes and reference variables.
  2. Apply the concepts of inheritance and polymorphism.
  3. Write and use virtual functions and overloaded operators.
  4. Create C++ classes with appropriate sets of constructors and destructors.
  5. Dynamically allocate and deallocate memory.
  6. Apply function overloading and operator overloading in C++ programs.
  7. Understand static data members and static member functions as well as templates and C++ standard library (STL).

CIS 256 : Advanced Visual Basic

In the second semester of Visual Basic, the student will learn to program with the advanced features available in Visual Basic and will focus on the logic involved in developing professional programs. The features covered will include user interfaces, controls including ActiveX controls, databases, object-oriented programming, VBScript and the Internet. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 156 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Design and develop Visual Basic programs using object oriented programming.
  2. Design, develop, execute and debug Visual Basic programs using advanced Visual Basic features.
  3. Work with more advanced features in accessing and maintaining databases.
  4. Work with web development using Visual Basic development.

CIS 257 : Object-Oriented JAVA Programming II

The course addresses software development using advanced object-oriented concepts and JAVA. It covers concurrency and synchronization issues and advanced topics of the object paradigm such as inheritance and polymorphism. It introduces the programming of graphics using JAVA Swing classes and examines File Streams and I/O Processing in detail. It compares the procedural paradigm with the object paradigm. It also addresses issues of programming with multiple processes and programming of systems with exception-handling capabilities. These concepts are introduced in the context of developing software using software tools, including libraries of components. Three lecture hours and two lab hours per week. Approximately 3-5 hours per week of computer time will be required to complete the programming assignments. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

  1. Understand the principals of the object-oriented programming.
  2. Learn concepts of programming by contract.
  3. Design and implement classes of objects.
  4. Use inheritance and polymorphism.
  5. Create applications using graphical user interface.
  6. Implement recursive algorithms and understand recursive programming.

CIS 258 : Advanced Interactive Programming

In this course, students write advanced programs and scripts for server-side Web development, building on the framework laid in previous courses. They increase their ability to use language and frameworks effectively in developing for a variety of mobile devices as well as laptop and desktop computers. The Web sites they build effectively support databases, data collection and passing, selection and advanced web handling. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 120 and CIS 159 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Work with Responsive Web Design to develop pages for a wide variety of devices and configurations.
  2. Work with some of the latest techniques in interactive programming.
  3. Implement advanced programming/scripting skills.
  4. Work with alternative methods of data exchange.
  5. Work with development for mobile devices.

CIS 260 : Software Specification and Design

This course covers object-oriented analysis and design, methodologies and tools. It focuses on methodologies of specification and design of software systems. It addresses the issues of user interface design and software prototyping. The course also presents the state of the art in the tool and environments supporting the front end of the software development cycle. Three lecture hours and two lab hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CIS 158 or CIS 257 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Learn about significance of modeling as a backbone of software development.
  2. Gain basic understanding of software process including quality management.
  3. Develop understanding and appreciation for formalism in software modeling and development.
  4. Learn Unified Modeling Language (UML) and its effective use in software development.
  5. Study wide range of design patterns and understand their role in software engineering.

CIS 261 : Introduction to Computer Systems

This course is an introduction to major components of computer systems. The course introduces fundamental concepts of computing systems such as binary arithmetic and data representation, the Von Neumann model for processing computer programs, the operation of memory, instruction set, and machine and assembly language programming. It systematically presents the levels of transformations from machine language to assembly language to high-level language. The course studies the role of such systems software components as assemblers, compilers, linkers, loaders, and operating systems. The course has a strong project component. Three lecture hours and two lab hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CIS 158 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

  1. Identify and describe different types of computing machines.
  2. Describe distinguishing components of Von-Neumann Architecture.
  3. Understand principals of machine language and program in assembly.
  4. Describe the relation between high level languages and assembly.
  5. Explain how bits and bytes are organized to represent data electronically.
  6. Describe how digital logic is used to build circuits to process information.

CIS 262 : Computer Organization and Design

Laws of computer organization and design for RISC architectures. Interfaces between hardware and software are studied. Influence of instruction set on performance is presented. Design of a processor with pipelining is analyzed. Computer arithmetic is studied. Memory hierarchy and their influence on performance are documented. Elements of interfacing and I/O organization are included. The course has design, implementation, and analytical components. Three lecture hours and two lab hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CIS 261 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Explain how a program written in a high level language such as C or Java is translated into the language of the hardware.
  2. Explain how hardware executes programs that have been translated.
  3. Determine the interface between hardware and software.
  4. Describe how software instructs hardware to perform a certain task.
  5. Understand how hardware design determines the performance of a program.

CIS 263 : Information Systems Seminar

Students develop their skills in a variety of computing areas, research career options, and develop a project that demonstrates the programming, database, and other skills they have acquired. Students develop a professional level Web portfolio using a variety of computing skills. One lecture hour per week. Spring

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Enrolled in or have taken a second-semester programming course and a database course or permission of the instructor.

  1. Demonstrate their skills in programming, database and a variety of computing areas acquired in the courses they have taken.
  2. Develop a professional online portfolio using a variety of tools, techniques and web based skills.
  3. Embellish their skills in research, web development and computer software as they complete their project and develop their portfolio.

     

CIS 270 : Systems Analysis and Design Seminar

Analyzing and designing effective business systems are the focus of this course. Emphasis is placed on today's tools for analyzing business problems, designing solutions and documenting the results. The student will learn the effective use of systems tools, the use and integration of microcomputer applications, the development of an effective database, and they will develop an understanding of the analysis and design processes. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CIS 150 or CIS 152 or CIS 159 or permission of the instructor.

Corequisites

CIS 150 or CIS 152 or CIS 159 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Do a preliminary and detailed analysis of a basic business problem using a variety of tools.
  2. Use a variety of tools to logically analyze business issues as part of the process of designing a computerized solution.
  3. Design a computerized solution including input, output, data and processing.
  4. Present the analysis and the design.
  5. Document the system effectively.
  6. Design and explain the testing and implementation of the system.
  7. Present an online portfolio of their work that can also be used in job searches.

CIS 271 : Network Installation and Configuration Seminar

This is a hands-on capstone course. It covers installation and upgrade procedures for current server operating systems. An Internetwork is planned, designed, implemented, managed, and documented. The network includes print, file and web hosting services as well as other current network services. Four hours of lecture per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CIS 231 with a grade of C or better

Corequisites

CIT 150 and CIS 232 and CIS 233 or permission of instructor.

  1. Install and configure Windows and Linux servers in a multi NOS, multi-client OS environment.
  2. Install and configure a Linux and Windows workstation that can simultaneously access Windows and Linux servers via mounted or mapped drives.
  3. Work as an active member of a team to design, select, configure and troubleshoot the server, clients, and services including DHCP and DNS in a business environment.
  4. Design and implement the IP address structure, subnets, subnet masks, VLANS and addresses on hosts.
  5. Design and implement Active Directory services with primary and backup domain controllers.
  6. Research, describe and evaluate new technologies as they could be used for the current network environment.

CIS 272 : Program Development Seminar

Student learn to analyze difficult programming problems and develop traditional or web based solutions for them. The course deals with sophisticated concepts of logic, program development, and data structures. It also covers the programming life-cycle and the concepts applicable to the development of standard and web based solutions. Students develop and implement individual programming projects using the languages they have learned. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Two prerequistes or one pre and one co-requisite from the following: CIS 250, CIS 255, CIS 256, CIS 257, CIS 258 or permission of the instructor.

  1. Analyze complex problems and code appropriate solutions that successfully consider business goals and effective user interaction.
  2. Integrate advanced programming techniques, advanced data handling and manipulation into a series of programs that demonstrates the programming skills they have acquired.
  3. Effectively explore areas of programming that have not been covered in class and integrate their findings into projects they develop.
  4. Present an online portfolio of their work that can also be used in job searches.

CIS 283 : Selected Topics in CIS

A Distance Learning course that offers students the opportunity to take selected courses via the Web. The list of courses available for a particular semester will be published prior to each semester when the course is being offered. Students select the curriculum they will complete from the published list of options. The student will then follow the Web based learning criteria for the selected course and receive credit for that course. There will be one orientation meeting at the beginning of the semester. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Not offered every year.

Credits

3
  1. students can take a variety of 3 credit courses and each course will have the designated outcomes