Computer Information Technology

Classes

CIT 102 : Security Awareness

This course introduces students to security and data confidentiality. The course presents a broad overview to help the student become more aware of computer security. Topics include securing data, confidentiality, integrity of data, password policies, and issues related to liability. One hour of lecture per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 1 credit Spring

Credits

1
  1. Identify and classify security threats and vulnerabilities facing an organization.
  2. Understand basic security concepts.
  3. Evaluate the potential of security products to meet identified threats.
  4. Secure Windows-based software and hardware platforms.
  5. Identify attacks against networks.

CIT 113 : Applied Technology Exploration

This course gives students hands-on experiences in a wide variety of technology applications. The students work with projects in areas such as web design and development, social networking, multimedia, logic, programming, operation systems and databases. The students will also explore issues of security, privacy, ethics and networking. Throughout this course students develop an understanding of the components of information technology systems and will explore career opportunities in technology. Three lecture hours per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Critical Thinking. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
Students that successfully complete this course will be able to: 1. Understand and effectively implement important aspects of Information Technology 2. Evaluate career possibilities and requirements in Information Technology 3. Apply critical thinking to solving Information Technology 4. Experiment with a variety of developments within Information Technology

CIT 121 : Information Technology Fluency I

This course introduces students to the technical and application concepts of information technology. The students develop a basic understanding of computing, operating systems, application packages in word processing and Excel and the basics of developing a web site. Students continue to acquire the intellectual knowledge as well as the concepts, skills, and the capabilities essential to a deep understanding of information technology. This course is the first of three courses needed to fulfill this objective. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
  1. List and define the basic components of a computer system.
  2. Effectively use a word processing document formatting features.
  3. Define basic networking terms.
  4. Create and publish a basic web page using HTML.
  5. Apply techniques to perform effective online searches and analyze the credibility of websites.
  6. Effectively create a spreadsheet using absolute and relative cell addresses in formulas.
  7. Explain the meaning of computer security and privacy and list the ways a computer can be compromised.
  8. Name three permitted/not permitted uses of licensed software.
  9. Create and post to a blog.
1
  1. Design and create a basic presentation using presentation software.

CIT 122 : Information Technology Fluency II

This course introduces students to logic and problem solving in the computing environment. Students develop a basic idea of programming, communicating with data, debugging, and solving computing problems. Students continue to acquire the intellectual knowledge as well as the concepts, skills, and capabilities essential to a deep understanding of information technology. This course is the second of three courses needed to fulfill this objective. Prerequisite: CIT 121 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
  1. Effectively read, write and evaluate algorithms.
  2. Design and create effective databases.
  3. Effectively structure and execute Structured Query Language (SQL) queries.
  4. Optimize data structures and tables that eliminate duplication, unnecessary data entry.
  5. Explain the rules of relational database and database normalizations.
  6. Create and publish HTML pages which contain Embedded JavaScript.

CIT 131 : Business Creativity

Business Creativity introduces students to basic graphic design and typographic principles in a computerized business environment. The course will give students the background necessary to identify and later apply these principles to create effective and aesthetically pleasing forms of computerized visual business communications. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits. Fall, Spring.

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Business Creativity will be able to:
  1. Understand the basic principles that apply to graphic design and typography as they apply to the needs of business communications
  2. Work with and exhibit these principles in a computerized environment
  3. Implement these principles through the creation of effective forms of valid business communications

CIT 132 : Desktop Publishing

The course covers the most common application packages used in business communications and commercial publishing. The student learns to combine text and graphics to create effective advertisements, brochures, newsletters, newspaper pages, and other printed material. An understanding of the printing process is developed so the student knows what is needed for professionally printed documents. Pre or co- requisite: CIT 131 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
  1. Use industry appropriate graphical tools to enhance graphics and photos for use in print publications.
  2. Use illustration software to create basic illustrations.
3. Create and design professional, effective, and aesthetically pleasing print publications, such as brochures, flyers, and newsletters, using popular desktop publishing software packages.

CIT 133 : Electronic Publishing

This course provides an introduction to electronic imaging, manipulating graphics, and presentation software. The class includes a module devoted to applications on the World Wide Web and covers how to combine graphics and text imported from a variety of files and applications. Emphasis is placed on designing and developing professionally finished products. Pre or co-requisite: CIS 162 or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
  1. Create and design professional, effective, and attractive electronic images.
  2. Manipulate graphics and photos.
  3. Create professional publications and/or presentations.
4. Create and maintain a professional website and/or blog.

CIT 134 : Social Media and the Web

Students will learn how to use social media as an effective promotional outlet. They will also increase their social media knowledge base via a variety of strategies and techniques. Topics covered will include YouTube, Linkedin, Twitter, Facebook, etc. Pre or co-requisite BUS 115. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
  1. Create multiple social media accounts (i.e. Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter, etc.) to allow for hands-on learning.
  2. Effectively utilize a variety of social media tools.
  3. Understand and design a successful social media campaign strategy and evaluate the industry applications and possibilities.

CIT 136 : Web Development for Mobile Devices

Students use HTML5, JavaScript, and a JavaScript framework to develop web applications for implementation on mobile devices. Students use server-side scripting to connect to and access database information. Prerequisite: CIS 122; pre or co-requisite: CIS 159 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
  1. Understand the possible development strategies for mobile applications development, evaluate the possibilities to prepare for development.
  2. Learn to use framework for developing web based mobile applications effectively.
  3. Develop a series of web-based mobile applications that included connection to and accessing a server database.

CIT 140 : Electronic Game Development I

This course is an overview of electronic game development that takes students from the conception of electronic games in the 1970s up through the next generation console and PC games of today. Students study the game design process, the research and development of the game, and prepare a game proposal. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Electronic Game Development I will be able to:
  1. Understand the history of electronic games
  2. Understand the basic logics and concepts of game play. .
  3. Understand the business of the game industry.
  4. Analyze critique, discuss and present games with appropriate terms and contexts.
  5. Understand the game creation process
  6. Understand writing for game development
  7. Understand researching and developing games
  8. Create a design document

CIT 141 : Visual Concepts for Game Designers

This course is an introduction to visual concepts and the software that supports their development. Students will learn what game developers need to create the realistic visuals seen in many popular game titles. Emphasis is placed on concepts needed to create actual assets for use in actual games. Pre- or co-requisite: CIT 140. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Visual Concepts for Game Designers will be able to:
  1. Understand the visual concept in game development.
  2. Understanding the importance of good visual development as it relates to game development.
  3. Demonstrate gain proficiency in visual development.
  4. Work in 2D and 3D visual development
  5. Research resources for visual development

CIT 142 : Computer Game Level Building

This course provides an introduction to planning and building game levels with a level editor. Students learn the importance of good level building and puzzle creation. Students are exposed to more than one level editor, and their strengths and weakness will be discussed. Pre or co-requisite: CIT 140 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Computer Game Level Building will be able to:
  1. Understand Level editing techniques
  2. Understand the principles of classic architecture in level design
  3. Understand optimization techniques for efficient level design
  4. Test play the levels, and examine them for defects

CIT 143 : Programming for Game Developers I

This course introduces programming for game developers. Students learn the basics of game programming using a popular game programming language and start out creating simple text games and move on to windows programming with an introduction to DirectX. The student leaves this course with a basic understanding of programming and the basic programming skills to start programming games. Prerequisite: CIT 140 and CIS 120 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Design a program to solve a problem.
  2. Create and differentiate structured and object-oriented programming.
  3. Recognize and use data types including arrays and strings.
  4. Understand how to put all of this together to develop simple games.

CIT 150 : Cybersecurity Principles

This course introduces the principles and practices of information systems security in computer networks. It covers the foundation of securing computer networks, including cryptography models, authentication, communications security, infrastructure security, operational and organization security. Students learn the risks, threats, and vulnerabilities of computer networks and countermeasure strategies. Topics include definition of terms, concepts, elements, and goals of incorporating industry standards and practices with a focus on confidentiality, integrity, and availability aspects of information systems. This course prepares students to sit for the current CompTIA Security+ certification exam. Prerequisite: CIS 134 Networking Technologies or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional support fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Critical Thinking, Information Literacy, and Scientific Reasoning and Discovery. 3 credits Fall, Spring.

Credits

3
1. Explain information systems security, why it is important, and its effect on people and businesses. 2. Describe the principles of risk management, risk assessments, and contingency planning to mitigate threats and vulnerabilities in an IT infrastructure. 3 .Describe networking principles, security mechanisms, cryptography models, and the role of access control in an IT infrastructure. 4. Describe the impact of malware on an organization’s systems and how to prevent and detect attacks. 5. Explain the role of security operations in an IT infrastructure including testing, monitoring, and incident handling. 6. Apply information security standards, professional certifications, and compliance laws to real-world applications in both the private and public sectors.

CIT 155 : Introduction of Computer Forensics

This is an introductory course in computer and digital forensics. The course covers the principles, procedures, and techniques used in computer forensic crime investigations. Topics include understanding computer investigations, current computer forensics tools, processing crime and incident scenes, and digital evidence controls. Students are introduced to file systems, data acquisition, and computer forensics analysis. Three hours of lecture per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits. Spring.

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Introduction of Computer Forensics will be able to:
  1. Familiarize with computer forensics as a profession
  2. Understand computer crime investigations
  3. Familiarize with current computer forensics tools
  4. Respond to incidents and process a scene of a crime
  5. Grasp the principals of Windows and Unix file systems
  6. Develop basic experience with computer forensics analysis tools
  7. Differentiate between tools for Unix, Mac, and Windows forensics

CIT 165 : Game Scripting

The course covers an introduction to game scripting. It will be both an introductory programming course and an intro to game modification and design using scripting languages. Offers students an opportunity to understand the basic principles of game engines and how to control games and game engines through relatively simple scripting techniques. Examines several different game engines including those where scripting is visual an those where scripting is textual. Studies critical concepts, including the game loop and triggering/collision events. Students choose game engines and scripts to implement based on critical analysis of existing games and on their own aspirations for being innovative game designers. Prerequisite(s): CIS 120 and CIT 143 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
1. Students will identify, discuss, evaluate the role of scripts in the development of games. 2. Apply appropriate scripting structure and syntax for game development.

CIT 170 : Digital Experience Management

Digital Experience Management combines traditional web content management and customer experience management. Students will explore software options that manage relationships with customers including interfacing with websites and social medial, chat, email, phone and other options. Topics include web analytics, content personalization, digital asset management and marketing automation. Instructional Support Fee applies. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
1. Apply digital experience management software at a level appropriate to basic application in the business setting. 2. Communicate effectively to convey technical information to the groups they support and to understand their needs. 3. Assess software options that manage relationships with customers including interacting with websites and social media, chat, email, phone and other options. 4. Demonstrate the ability to employ web analytics, content personalization, digital asset management and marketing automation.

CIT 175 : Print and Digital Publishing

Print and Digital Publishing covers the industry standard software used in business, commercial, educational and other professions for print and digital output. Students created production-ready files for print, mobile and other digital devices. Prerequisite(s): CIT 131 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
1. Produce production-ready files for both print and digital devices. 2. Use industry appropriate graphical tools to enhance graphics and photos for use in print and digital publications. 3. Use illustration software to create basic illustrations. 4. Create and design professional, effective, and aesthetically pleasing print and digital publications using popular software packages.

CIT 231 : Introduction to Multimedia Development

Multimedia allows the development of dynamic presentations involving sound, motion, and interactivity. In this course, students learn to prepare business presentations using specialized programs. Emphasis is placed on learning the technical skills to utilize the multimedia software effectively to create business presentations and demonstrations. Prerequisite: CIS 162 or permission of the instructor. Three hours of lecture per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
  1. Create an effective multimedia presentation.
  2. Use multimedia software package to implement effective design in multimedia.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of how to use multimedia effectively as a business communication tool.

CIT 240 : Modding I

A mod can be anything from a simple game modification to new levels or even to a new game. This course examines the mod community online. The goal is to understand what it takes to make a top-notch mod. Aspiring game developers can choose from hundreds of semiformal mod groups to study. Students seek out existing mods and reviews them with a critical eye. Prerequisites: CIT 141 and CIT 142 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Modding I will be able to:
  1. Understand what a mod is
  2. Understand how a mod is created
  3. Understand how a mod team is organized
  4. Understand what makes a good mod
  5. Create a mod team using basic knowledge
  6. Understand how to market a finished game in order to gain funding or find a full-time job in the game industry. Students will utilize this understanding in later courses when they are required to create their own mod.

CIT 241 : Electronic Game Development II

This course is a continuation of CIT 140 and focuses on more advanced concepts of game development and production. Students work on scripting and developing characters, as well as exploring and understanding the concepts of game shells and game engines. Prerequisite: CIT 141 and CIT 142 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Electronic Game Development II will be able to:
  1. Understand the concept of the development team and of game development.
  2. Understand how to script a game and develop characters.
  3. Understanding the roles involved in game development and working together to accomplish the game
  4. Use simple game engines.

CIT 242 : Programming for Game Developers II

This course expands the knowledge base in programming that was begun in CIT 143. Students further their knowledge of programming and DirectX and focus on more complex gaming techniques. Topics include advanced use of graphics, sound, and input, and an understanding of new and emerging software technologies as they relate to game development. Prerequisite: CIT 143 or permission of the instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Programming for Game Developers II will be able to:
  1. Create code that is well organized and commented
  2. Create simple games with sound, graphics and input (while using a game developer kit or game engine).
  3. Understand simple and advanced 2D graphics concepts and be able to use them
  4. Understand simple 3D graphics concepts and be able to use them.

CIT 243 : Game and Sound Protection

This is a project-oriented course. Students work together to create an end product. Students gain an understanding of sound and how to effectively incorporate it into games and multi-media projects. At the end of the course, students will develop and disseminate a simple game. Prerequisite: CIT 241 or pre or co-requisite: CIS 162, or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
Students will:
  1. Successfully edit sound files.
  2. Record and edit voice-over sound tracks using a variety of tools.
  3. Analyze impact of audio as a production element.
  4. Evaluate and compare an assortment of software tools.

CIT 245 : Game Design on Paper

In this course, students create games on paper only. Understanding the history of paper games is a key to understanding game design. The course includes analysis of games ranging from Tic-Tac-Toe to Dungeons and Dragons. No computers are used in the course. Prerequisites: CIT 140 and ENG 101, or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Game Design on Paper will be able to:
  1. Be able to design a game, from scratch, on paper
  2. Be able to think about and analyze games outside the computing environment
  3. Have a deep understanding of what makes games fun, what keeps players interested and how to balance rules with fun.

CIT 246 : Modding II

Students collaborate on a complete game level mod in this course, developing it from start to finish. The course emphasizes using an existing mod and adding and modifying elements with a focus on gameplay. Students also develop supporting materials that can be used to promote their mod. Prerequisites: CIT 240 and CIT 245 or permission of the instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Modding II will be able to:
  1. Understand how to create a game mod from start to finish
  2. Develop a mod
  3. Use an existing mod and add elements to it with a focus on gameplay.
  4. Use an existing mod and alter elements in it with a focus on gameplay
  5. Develop supporting materials that can be used to promote the mod that they developed

CIT 247 : Pre-Production Game Development

In this project-oriented course, students work together to design and plan the development cycle of one or more games, which they will develop cooperatively in CIT 276. Students learn to write a game proposal and to schedule development resources. Students examine various game development tools used to create all the necessary game assets. Pre or co-requisite: CIT 241 or CIT 242 and CIT 260 or permission of the instructor. Three hours of lecture per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Pre-Product Game Development will be able to:
  1. Understand the structure of a game proposal
  2. Understand the scheduling considerations necessary to schedule development resources
  3. Understand the development cycle in creating a game
  4. Work effectively as a member of a team
  5. Communicate effectively within the team
  6. Develop a plan for implementation the following semester

CIT 248 : Data Structures in the Game Environment

This is the third of a sequence of programming courses, following CIT 143 and CIT 242. This course focuses on data structures and algorithms commonly used in computer games. Topics include tables, lists, trees, queues, and stacks, as well as algorithm analysis. Prerequisite: CIT 242 or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Data Structures in the Game Environment will be able to:
  1. Write code that can process data efficiently
  2. Recognize what algorithms work best under what conditions and why
  3. Understand what data structures can help the processing of game data in certain situations
  4. Know how the choice of data structures and algorithms affect the performance of a program.
  5. Know how to write several types of data sorting algorithms.

CIT 249 : Visual Concepts for Game Designers II

This course continues the study of visual concepts and the software that supports their development. Students will work on more advanced concepts. Emphasis is placed on the concepts and skills needed to create actual assets for use in actual games. Prerequisite(s): CIT 141 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
At the completion of this course, the students should be able to do the following: 1. Create models for games. 2. Create textures for games. 3. Animate characters for games. 4. Export game ready assets. 5. Import assets into games.

CIT 250 : Cyber Defense and Firewall Security

This course offers an introduction to firewalls and virtual private networks (VPNs) for securing a network. Various network security-related issues, such as threats and business challenges, are introduced and examined. The course addresses firewall functionality and how to select, construct, configure, and manage a firewall. Different types of VPNs for securing data in an organization are also addressed including the benefits, various architectures, and implementation considerations. In addition, students will learn the essentials of secure network design and management. Prerequisite: CIT 150 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Critical Thinking, Information Literacy, and Scientific Reasoning and Discovery. 3 Credits Fall.

Credits

3
1. Explain the fundamental concepts of network security and the impact of risks, threats, and vulnerabilities. 2. Describe common network topologies, network infrastructures, and incorporate them into a secure network design. 3. Describe the fundamental functions performed by firewalls, common firewall technologies, and the elements of firewall implementation and configuration. 4. Describe the fundamental functions of virtual private networks (VPNs), common VPN technologies, and associated authentication methods. 5. Implement firewalls and VPNs to protect a network from various types of attacks and exploits. 6. Identify firewall and network security management best practices.

CIT 251 : Managing Risks in Information Systems

This course addresses the broad topic of risk management and how risk, threats, and vulnerabilities impact information systems. Topics include risk management fundamentals, legal and regulatory compliance, performing risk assessments, identifying and protecting assets, and using appropriate frameworks. Areas of instruction also include how to assess and manage risk based on defining an acceptable level of risk for information systems. Elements of a business impact analysis (BIA), business continuity plan (BCP), disaster recovery plan (DRP), and computer incident response team (CIRT) plan will also be discussed. Prerequisite: CIT 150 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Critical Thinking, Information Literacy, and Scientific Reasoning and Discovery. 3 Credits. Fall.

Credits

3
1. Describe components of and approaches to effective risk management and assessments in an organization. 2. Describe mitigation techniques for relevant threats, vulnerabilities, and exploits. 3. Identify compliance laws, standards, best practices, and policies of risk management. 4. Identify assets and activities to protect within an organization. 5. Identify risk mitigation security controls and develop a risk mitigation plan. 6. Perform business continuity planning, including business impact analysis, disaster recovery, and incident response planning.

CIT 252 : Critical Security Controls

This course provides a foundation for access control and identity management methods used to secure networks, data, and information systems in both the public and private sectors and in organizations large and small. Topics include data classification, identification, authentication, authorization, and accounting protocols and services for information systems whether local, remote, or cloud-based architectures. Security controls for access control including tokens, biometrics, and the use of public key infrastructures (PKI) will also be covered. Prerequisite: CIT 150 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Critical Thinking, Information Literacy, and Scientific Reasoning and Discovery. 3 Credits. Spring.

Credits

3
1. Define access control, identity management, and appropriate technical solutions to mitigate risk and threats in an IT infrastructure. 2. Implement remote access, PKI, and encryption solutions to ensure confidentiality, integrity, and availability of business communications. 3. Mitigate risk from unauthorized access to IT systems through proper testing and monitoring. 4. Analyze how information classification standards impact IT infrastructure access control requirements and implementation. 5. Develop an access control policy framework consisting of best practices for policies, standards, procedures, and guidelines to mitigate unauthorized access. 6. Assess the consequences of failed access controls and mitigate unauthorized access.

CIT 255 : Digital Forensics

This course focuses on the areas of computer and digital forensic analysis. Topics include data acquisition, computer forensics analysis, recovering image files, network forensics, mobile devices, and email investigations, as well as the boot process and file system of Windows, Linux, and Macintosh computer systems. Pre-requisite(s): CIS 134 and CIT 155. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 4 Credits. Spring.

Credits

4
1. Determine the need for conducting forensics analysis of computers, mobile devices, and/or networking equipment. 2. Explain the detailed steps to acquire, preserve, and analyze forensic data. 3. Describe the methodologies for identifying and acquiring assets to be analyzed. 4. Employ forensic tools and techniques at the scene of an investigation. 5. Apply tools and techniques to extract data from evidence during an investigation.

CIT 256 : File System Forensic Analysis

This course discusses how data is stored on disk and where and how digital evidence can be found on the disk. The majority of digital evidence is found on a disk and knowing how and why the evidence exists can help an investigator to provide testimony in a more knowledgeable manner. Basic concepts and theory of a volume and file system are covered and applied to an investigation. The course also explores analysis techniques and special considerations that the investigator should make based on the file system. In addition, the data structures associated with volume and file systems are given and disk images are analyzed. The phases and guidelines of a digital investigation are also presented. Prerequisites: CIT 155 and CIS 106 and CIS 134, or permission of the instructor. Three hours of lecture per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
  1. Understand digital investigation foundation.
  2. Gain experience with different file systems.
  3. Acquire a variety of analysis techniques.
  4. Work with multiple operating systems and tools.
  5. Learn how data is stored on computer persistent storage.
  6. Practice finding digital evidence on computer disks.

CIT 260 : Topics in Game Programming

This course covers a variety of issues that are important in game development. Topics include artificial intelligence, game world dynamics, human interfaces, and supporting tools. The course incorporates new developments in the programming area as they emerge. Students use their foundation in C++ to apply each topic to a computer game program. Prerequisite: CIT 242 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
  1. Program basic artificial intelligence in a game.
  2. Understand how to use game world dynamics to create a richer game experience.
  3. Understand the concepts and application of human interface programming.
  4. Understand the concepts, development of and use of supporting tools.
  5. Gain further proficiency in programming.
  6. Apply these diverse topics to the development of a game program.

CIT 261 : Fundamentals of Game Engine Design

This course covers various components of game engine design. A well-designed game engine handles processing and reduces the unique coding requirements, making the game more efficient and effective. Students learn how to put together a game engine that can be used by multiple games. The course addresses such aspects of game engines as graphics, sound, input, and tools. Pre or co-requisite: CIT 242 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
  1. Be able to write a game engine that has 2D graphics, sound and input.
  2. Know how to create a library that could be used by multiple programs.
  3. Understand the pros and cons of writing your own game engine versus licensing a pre-made engine.

CIT 262 : Advanced Game Analysis

In this course, students examine current computer and console games with a critical eye. This process solidifies their experience in mod development and game design. Students increase the depth of their understanding by continual review of a variety of games. The course also focuses on developing student awareness of the differing quality levels of games. Pre or co-requisite: CIT 245 or permission of instructor. Three class hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
Students who successfully complete Advanced Game Analysis will be able to:
  1. Learn constructive criticism techniques
  2. Understand why some games are more popular than others
  3. Understand how to improve games
  4. Understand the difference between taste and technical considerations

CIT 270 : Seminar in Desktop Publishing, Imaging and Multimedia Design

By working in design teams on multifaceted projects, this course will allow students to apply their skills in creative design, desktop publishing, electronic imaging, and multimedia applications by developing projects needed by businesses, industries, and the community. Students will master at least one suite of design and/or multimedia products and will produce professional quality work which then may be printed, distributed electronically, and/or accessed via the internet, CD or kiosk. Prerequisites: CIT 131, CIT 132, CIT 133 and CIT 231, or permission of instructor. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
  1. Apply their skills in creative design, desktop publishing, electronic imaging, and multimedia applications.
  2. Develop projects that implement the needs of businesses, industries, and/or the community.
  3. Utilize at least one suite of design and/or multimedia products.
  4. Produce professional quality work which then may be printed, distributed electronically, and/or accessed via the internet, kiosk or other method.

CIT 274 : Cybersecurity and Forensics Seminar

This capstone course provides students with the opportunity to apply cybersecurity and digital forensics principles to complete a comprehensive capstone project. Students will plan, design, implement, troubleshoot, and document an enterprise network such that access to internal services, both to the LAN and the Internet, can be allowed or denied in a secure manner. Students will work with Windows and Linux workstations, servers, switches, VLANs, firewalls, and routers to complete the project. Students will also work with forensically sound procedures in collecting, analyzing, and documenting digital evidence. Prerequisite(s): CIT 250 and CIT 251; pre or co-requisite(s): CIT 252, CIT 255 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture and two lab hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Critical Thinking, Information Literacy, and Scientific Reasoning and Discovery. 4 Credits. Spring.

Credits

4
1. Construct an enterprise network using hardware and software resources for a given network design. 2. Demonstrate network security, endpoint protection, and access control of an enterprise network through appropriate configuration of network protocols and services. 3. Develop an information security plan for an enterprise organization using risk management frameworks. 4. Design the components of a business continuity and disaster recovery plan for an enterprise organization. 5. Apply forensically sound procedures to collect, analyze, and document digital evidence.

CIT 275 : Computer Forensics Seminar

This is a capstone course in the Computer Forensics option. It allows students to use the computer forensics skills they have developed to work on a comprehensive capstone project. The project includes case studies in which the student is expected to use forensically sound procedures in collecting, analyzing, and documenting all digital evidence. Prerequisite: CIT 255 with a grade of C or better; Pre or co-requisite: CIT 256. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Information Literacy. 4 credits Spring

Credits

4
Students who successfully complete Computer Forensics Seminar will be able to:
  1. Show that they can properly identify digital evidence
  2. Show proper chain of custody for digital evidence they process
  3. Show proficiency in the proper techniques and procedures for imaging numerous different pieces of digital media
  4. Show proficiency in searching identifying and exporting relevant digital evidence in a method that will maintain the forensics status of all meta data
  5. Write and produce a forensics report on their procedures and findings
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of testifying about their findings in Courts, administrative hearings and disciplinary hearings

CIT 276 : Game Production

This project-oriented course brings together all components of the game development program to create a unique game. At the end of the course, students each have a game that they can show to prospective employers. Prerequisite: CIT 247. Two lecture hours and and four laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 4 credits Spring

Credits

4
Students who successfully complete Computer Game Production will be able to:
  1. Understand the concepts of marketing a game
  2. Create a playable demo-grade game.
  3. Participate as a member of a team.
  4. Work in a team environment which integrates a variety of skills into the product production
  5. Understand the concepts of working in a team including skill balancing, delegation, team building, communication, asset management within a team, successful strategies
  6. Modify and implement a production plan
  7. Apply time and resource management principles to the development and production of games.
  8. Employ production schedules as part of the project management process.
  9. Maintain workflow documentation and production log.

CIT 277 : Cybersecurity Capstone

The capstone course for the Cybersecurity Certificate is a practical application of the control framework that guides an information security plan. It includes boundary controls, access controls, integrity controls, cryptographic controls and auditing controls. Prerequisite(s): CIT 250, CIT 251, pre or co-requisite(s): CIT 252 or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
Students will identify, discuss, evaluate and plan implementation of boundary controls, access controls, integrity controls, cryptographic controls and auditing controls within a critical control framework. Students will successfully complete case studies that relate to the security needed for a given scenario.

CIT 281 : Cloud Computing

Students learn how to deploy cloud-based computing services including executing a deployment plan, the most common service models, and the various ways that clouds are delivered such as public, private, and community. Topics include virtualization, service-oriented architectures, migrating to the cloud, implementing cloud security, cloud operations, cloud performance, and cloud troubleshooting. This course prepares students to pass cloud-based certification exams including the CompTIA Cloud+ CV0-002 exam and Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud Practitioner. Prerequisite: CIT150 Cybersecurity Principles or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional support fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Critical Thinking, Information Literacy, and Scientific Reasoning and Discovery. 3 Credits, Fall

Credits

3
1. Describe the most common cloud components, service models, and cloud solutions. 2. Describe the advantages, disadvantages, and economic impact of cloud computing on business processes. 3. Describe the process of migrating services to the cloud. 4. Explain how to execute a cloud deployment plan using the most common service models. 5. Implement cloud security for networks, computer systems, and cloud-based storage systems. 6. Demonstrate how to manage cloud systems and provision resources in response to shifting business requirements and application life cycles.

CIT 285 : Ethical Hacking

This course is an introduction to hacking tools, techniques, and incident handling. Areas of instruction include an evolution of hacking and penetration testing; the basics of cryptology for information security; foot printing; vulnerability scanning and exploit; wireless, web, and database attacks; malware and system exploit; traffic analysis; incident response; and defensive technologies and controls. In this course, the students will learn how to discover vulnerabilities, how to attack and defend systems, how to respond to attacks, and how to identify and design controls to prevent future attacks. This course prepares students to pass the EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker certification exam. Pre or co-requisites: CIS 115, or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Critical Thinking, Ethical Dimensions, Information Literacy, and Scientific Reasoning and Discovery. 3 credits, Spring

Credits

3
1. Explain the history and current state of hacking and penetration testing, including ethical and legal implications. 2. Describe fundamental TCP/IP concepts, networking technologies, and their known vulnerabilities. 3. Identify common information-gathering tools and techniques to stage system attacks. 4. Identify security controls and defensive technologies to mitigate common types of malware, threats, and vulnerabilities exploited by hackers. 5. Perform system hacking, web attacks, and database attacks against IT systems. 6. Perform network traffic analysis, sniffing, and incident handling using appropriate tools and methods