English

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

ENG 091 : Integrated Reading & Writing

This course is designed to develop critical thinking by integrating reading, writing, and learning strategies.  Emphasis is placed on critical reading skills necessary to understand complex college-level texts and write in response to them.  Using a theme-based approach to readings, coursework will encourage students to read closely and independently in order to comprehend, summarize, analyze, and make connections between texts.  Students will respond to reading through writing assignments that demand practice of paragraph and essay structure, as well as integration of quotations and citations in MLA format.  Fundamental writing skills such as punctuation, sentence structure, and word choice are also covered.  ENG 091: Integrated Reading and Writing may not be used to meet the General Education English requirement, nor do the credits apply toward a degree.  Grade points earned in this course will not be computed into the student's GPA. Six lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer. 

Credits

6

1. Employ a reading and a writing process, including pre-reading and pre-writing strategies, through drafting and revision. 
2. Recognize structural patterns in a text and annotate to identify main ideas both explicit and inferred. 
3. Summarize and synthesize information found in multiple sources. 
4. Analyze audience, purpose and voice as both a reader and writer. 
5. Respond to reading through writing, including essay form that organizes ideas into body paragraphs to support a purposeful thesis. 
6. Support ideas with relevant evidence from both real-world experience and texts, integrating quoted information and using MLA citation format. 
7. Correct common grammatical and syntax errors using Standard Written English. 
8. Demonstrate the ability to use digital tools and technologies for reading and writing tasks.

ENG 092 : Composition I: Studio

This course is designed to accompany ENG101:Composition I College Writing.  Students enrolled in this course should also be enrolled in ENG101, with the same instructor. Course content of Composition I Studio is designed to supplement classroom activities and assignments in ENG101. Students will generate and organize ideas, draft, revise and edit writing. They also practice reading and writing processes to build reading and information literacy skills for integration into their ENG101 writing projects. Instruction is offered through small groups and one-on-one conferences. ENG092: Composition I Studio may not be used to meet General Education English requirement, nor do the credits apply toward a degree. Grade point earned in this course will not be computed into the student's GPA. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Corequisites

Designated linked ENG 101 course.

  1. Read and write using a process
  2. Annotate readings
  3. Write to a particular audience and for a particular audience
  4. Write focused pieces in paragraph and essay forms
  5. Identify structural patterns and main ideas for written response to readings
  6. Develop written ideas in an organized way with details, examples, logic and evidence for writing responses
  7. Apply principles of grammar, usage, syntax, mechanics and academic vocabulary in an appropriate and meaningful manner

ENG 101 : Composition I: College Writing

College-Composition I provides students an opportunity to develop and reflect on their own process of writing through various stages of planning, composing, revising, and editing. In addition, students learn how to formulate and support a thesis using a number of rhetorical strategies, to engage in the research process and to practice critical reading strategies for the purpose of documenting credible sources to support claims. Students write in accordance with the conventions of written English and incorporate digital tools and technologies. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Written Communication Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the College's writing and reading placement tests, or completion of ENG 091 with a C or better.

  1. Write using different stages of the writing process, from prewriting through composing and revising. Develop individual writing processes unique to the student and writing purpose, and demonstrate the ability to reflect on those writing processes.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to compose using digital tools and technologies.
  3. Apply rhetorical knowledge, including audience awareness, purpose, appropriate conventions of written English, and approaches, related to various writing tasks.
  4. Develop active reading practices with diverse texts to identify rhetorical features, articulate what they have read, and expand their knowledge base.
  5. Engage in a research process to develop, explore, and address meaningful questions. Locate, evaluate, summarize, integrate, and document credible primary and/or secondary sources for support or inquiry.

ENG 102 : Composition II: Writing about Literature

College Composition II builds upon the critical reading and writing skills learned in ENG 101 while using poetry, drama, and fiction as the primary texts for examination. Using a writing process, students will continue to develop complex and diverse writing projects where synthesis and analysis are emphasized. They will apply terminology and theory to develop literary arguments. In doing so, students will make connections between culturally diverse literature and its relevance to the human experiences in the 21st century. Three lecture hours per week. Competencies met: Written Communication, and Critical Thinking. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Develop an interpretation of a literary work that uses reasoning and textual evidence to support their claims while using clear Standard Written English and
  2. applying MLA style and documentation as needed.
  3. Write with an awareness of diverse audiences and a variety or purposes and strengthen their critical thinking, reading, and writing processes.
  4. Compose multiple cohesive texts that demonstrate synthesis and analysis.
  5. Articulate the relevance and value of literature, making connections between culturally diverse literary works and the world around them.
  6. Respond critically to various literary genres through close reading, research, discussion, and written analysis.
  7. Apply literary terminology and theory when writing about literature to argue a position based on sound reasoning and convincing textual evidence.
  8. Identify and engage with problems and issues across a range of human experience to locate and investigate assumptions.

ENG 214 : Critical Writing and Academic Research

This course combines the study of argumentation with the instruction needed for students to conduct semester long academic research projects. Diverse philosophies of argument will be considered, including Aristotle's and Toulmin's, as well as inductive and deductive reasoning and logical fallacies. Students will critically evaluate popular media, websites, print sources, and literature, and analyze the various ways that authors attempt to persuade their readers. In doing so, students will learn how to compose ethically sound arguments. Students will design a research proposal, compose an annotated bibliography, and synthesize their secondary sources into an argumentative research essay using the MLA format. Three hours of library instruction are included as part of the course. Three lecture hours per week. Competencies met: Written Communication (2.1), Humanities (6.0), Ethical Dimension (7.0). Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

    By the end of the semester students will be able to:
  1. Analyze written arguments from a variety of philosophical perspectives and their impact on the human experience.
  2. Evaluate evidence and use it to support and debunk argumentative claims.
  3. Evaluate contrasting points of view on an issue and evaluate the ethics of each of them.
  4. Critically read arguments with a skeptical eye.
  5. Create, interpret, and evaluate visual, verbal, artistic, and other forms of communication for biases and emotional appeals.
  6. Effectively utilize library resources to conduct an extensive research project.
  7. Draft an annotated bibliography and understand its role in the research process.
  8. Successfully utilize a variety of primary and secondary sources to support an argument.
  9. Compose analytically and ethically sound arguments using sufficient, credible evidence while considering the justice, fairness, and ramifications associated with these arguments.

ENG 215 : Technical Writing

This course emphasizes the style of writing used in business and industry. Students will examine and then prepare the kinds of documents called for in these fields, including letters and other correspondence, reports, and proposals, with special attention focused on audience analysis, format and editing. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Recognize and address the needs of different audiences.
  2. Create a variety of technical and business documents, including letters, memorandums, short reports, formal emails and so on, employing the writing process.
  3. Demonstrate mastery of the different formats for business and technical documents.
  4. Display solid proofreading skills relative to grammatical, mechanical, and usage issues.
  5. Work within groups and collaboratively create technical and business documents.
  6. Undertake research, identifying relevant print and electronic documents and, when appropriate, developing such applications for primary source investigation as surveys, questionnaires, interviews, and experiments.
  7. Employ the MLA method of documentation or another recognized field-specific system such as the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Council of Science Editors (CSE).

ENG 217 : Writings from the Margins of Contemporary American Literature

This course focuses on literature by multicultural/multiethnic writers writing about issues of race, class, gender, acculturation, and other themes emerging from the experience of living on the margins of contemporary American society. Texts and their authors living between two worlds -- African American, Asian-American, Native-American, Hispanic-American, European-American, Middle Eastern-American, and other borders -- are studied. Literary genres include poetry, drama, short fiction, non-fiction, and the novel. Students read, discuss, analyze, and write about the cultural and social impact of being a hyphenated-American on authors and the world they inhabit. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Multicultural Perspective (5.3), Humanities (6.0) Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of the instructor.
  1. Critically analyze literary works in general.
  2. Demonstrate understanding of themselves in relation to the cultural contributions of other cultures.
  3. Increase their awareness and understanding of what it means to be a person of one’s own ethnicity, race, gender, or class in America culture.
  4. Engage in discovery through the reading of literature of the values, beliefs, and experiences of people with perspectives different from one’s own, and understand their uniqueness and commonalities.
  5. Analyze and explicate your interpretation for minority cultures and the themes of race, gender, class, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, as represented in the assigned readings.
  6. Demonstrate how common or culturally specific heritage, perspectives, histories and/or belief systems influenced the writers in this course and the forms or genres in which they wrote.
  7. Develop a well-supported interpretation of a literary text.
  8. Illustrate critical thinking skills in well-developed thesis statements and paragraphs with relevant examples and details from literary text being analyzed.

ENG 230 : Film

In this introductory course, students apply the language of film, photography, mis en scene, movement, montage, sound, to theories of meaning-making, and aesthetics in movies. Students analyze the dynamics between viewer and image by applying a variety of critical thinking approaches to selected films from within and outside of the Hollywood tradition. Moreover, students explore the ways a film may reflect and influence a society and culture. Topics for reading, writing, and discussion may include masculinity/femininity, sexuality, race, class, ethics, and genre. Four class hours per week to accommodate screenings. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Identify the components of the visual language of film.
  2. Describe three basic techniques of editing.
  3. Define and use the terms in the glossary of their film text.
  4. Identify and describe the four elements of sound used in film.
  5. Describe the role of the director and discuss the auteur theory.
  6. Distinguish between expressionistic and realistic styles in film.
  7. Discuss the significant aspects of various historical periods in film.
  8. Identify the major characteristics of selected film genres.
  9. Write a critical analysis of a selected film.
  10. Carry on basic research on film topics in the library.

ENG 233 : Beginning Poetry Writing

This course provides students with an introduction to the craft of poetry via intense practice in writing original poetry and in analyzing poetic techniques employed by traditional and contemporary poets. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor.

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  1. Develop their own creative writing process and poetic voice.
  2. Analyze poetic genres (such as the haiku and sonnet) and techniques (such as imagery, rhyme, and meter).
  3. Employ poetic genres and techniques in their own writing.
  4. Revise their poetry through critique and the workshop process.
  5. Create a portfolio of revised original work that would be suitable for submission to literary publications.

ENG 251 : World Literature I

This writing-intensive seminar introduces students to the origins and evolution of world literature through 1700. Students examine how texts such as"The Epic of Gilgamesh" and the Bible emerged as products of a society's oral tradition. Students further explore how the oral tradition influenced authors such as Homer, Virgil, Dante, Chaucer, and Milton. Emphasis is placed on poetry, drama, traditional and literary epics, tragedies, fabliaux, satires, and romances as students consider how these texts influenced the development of modern literature. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Explain how the religious views of a particular culture directly influenced its literature.
  2. Identify common thematic concerns throughout literature from diverse time periods and cultures.
  3. Compare and contrast similar stories told from different cultural perspectives.
  4. Analyze verse and summarize the role that it plays in story telling.
  5. Examine the life of an author and explain how his or her upbringing and culture influenced the issues and ideas expressed in the literature.
  6. Evaluate literary criticism and determine its usefulness in literary studies.

ENG 252 : World Literature II

This writing-intensive seminar introduces students to the evolution of world literature from 1700 to the 21st Century. Representative works of neoclassicism, romanticism, Gothicism, realism, and naturalism are considered. Authors such as Daniel Defoe, Henrick Ibsen, Gaston Leroux, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Thomas Mann, Albert Camus, Elie Wiesel, Toni Morrison, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Gibson, Salman Rushdie, and Jhumpa Lahari are examined. Emphasis is placed on the rise of the novel, modern theatre, and poetry. Competency met: Global Awareness (5.2), Humanities (6.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Explain how the thematic concept of “Other” is illustrated in works of literature from diverse time periods and cultures.
  2. Explain how the rise of the Gothic influenced the development of world literature.
  3. Read diverse texts and discern the implied social commentaries that are embedded in them.
  4. Examine the life of an author and explain how his or her upbringing and culture influenced the issues and ideas expressed in the literature.
  5. Evaluate literary criticism and determine its usefulness in literary studies.

ENG 253 : English Literature I

A survey of the seminal authors who wrote in English from the medieval period to the mid-eighteenth century such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Congreve and Swift. Besides the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and the Enlightenment are studied for their generic developments (in comedy, lyric and satire) and their cultural history. Some emphasis on reading aloud. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor.
  1. Perceive that English literature, like all national literature, draws upon inherited stories, genres, and styles.
  2. Reflect on the ways that literature echoes the history and cultural values of the writer and of the times while offering significant meaning for us as individuals and for our own time.
  3. Realize that reading literature well requires both an ability to examine a work thoughtfully, but also to enter imaginatively into the world of the text.
  4. Discern that writing back in response to literature, as well as speaking with others and sharing writing, enables students to become thoughtful and empathetic readers and writers.

ENG 254 : English Literature II

Concentrating on Romantic poetry and the novel, this second semester deals with English writers from Wordsworth to D.H. Lawrence. Topics include women and society, individualism versus industrialism, and the novel from Jane Austen through V.S. Naipaul. Periods include the Romantic, the Victorian and the Twentieth Century. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor.
  1. Discover historical, thematic and stylistic connections among the various works that we study.
  2. Gain an understanding as to the evolution of the British empire from the time of the Industrial Revolution through the Colonial and Postcolonial periods.
  3. Develop a way of reading that is active and thoughtful.
  4. Generate writing in response to the literature, grounded in solid, textual evidence.

ENG 255 : American Literature Precolonial to 1865

This course surveys a variety of authors and genres of writing from pre-colonial times through the Civil War. Readings are drawn from works by Native Americans, Spanish, French, and English explorers; Puritans, Revolutionary War leaders, African Americans, Gothic writers, Transcendentalists and abolitionists, and early feminists. Topics for discussion and writing include ways in which both an author's culture as well as historical circumstances, informed the author's work, the work of other authors, and our understanding of who we are as multicultural Americans. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0); Multicultural Perspective (5.3). Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor.
  1. Further their critical thinking and writing skills about literature gained in ENG 10
  2. Recognize ways in which changing beliefs and attitudes about race, gender, religion, ethnicity, social class, disability, sexual orientation, and linguistic background influence who and gets published – no longer canonical writers only.
  3. Challenge their own assumptions or expectations about what American literature is and who its authors are.
  4. Identify various literary styles and genres, some European in origin and some specifically American.
  5. Articulate major values, beliefs, and traditions of different cultures as reflected in the literature.
  6. Recognize and demonstrate the social and historical circumstances that shaped the values, beliefs, and traditions of different cultures as reflected in the literature.
  7. Understand and illustrate that writers of different cultures are influenced by each other.
  8. Recognize that literature is a means of creating identification of self and society.
  9. Evaluate the extent to which American literature informs his or her own sense of self.

ENG 256 : American Literature Post Civil War to Present

This course surveys a variety of authors and genres of writing after the Civil War to the present. Readings are drawn from works some considered to be"classics," by Americans of Western European , African, and Native cultures; writers from increasing numbers of immigrant cultures, including Mexican, Eastern European, Asian, and Caribbean, and works reflective of a postwar culture. Topics for discussion and writing include ways in which both an author's culture as well as social and historical circumstances, inform the author's work, the work of other authors, and our understanding of who we are as increasingly diverse multicultural Americans. Three class hours a week. Competency Met: Humanities (6.0); Multicultural Perspective (5.3) Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor.
  1. Further skills gained in ENG 102, such as critical writing, writing, and research.
  2. Recognize ways in which evolving attitudes about race, gender, religion, ethnicity, social class, disability, sexual orientation, and linguistic background affect both writers and readers.
  3. Challenge their own assumptions or expectations about what characterizes American literature and its body of authors.
  4. Identify various literary styles and genres, some traditional to the dominant culture, some traditional to an indigenous or a minority culture, some a combination or adaptation of those just mentioned.
  5. Articulate values, beliefs, and traditions particular to individual cultures as reflected in literature.
  6. Perceive and explicate how values, beliefs, and traditions of different cultures, as reflected in the literature, are shaped by social and historical circumstances.
  7. Realize that literature is a means of creating identification of self and society and that such identification is dynamic.
  8. Evaluate the extent to which the increasing diversity of American literature influences their own sense of self.

ENG 257 : Contemporary African-American Women's Writing

Students will read short stories, novels, autobiographies, speeches, essays, poems, memoirs, and plays by some of the most celebrated writers in the world today. In reading literature written in the past two decades by and about African American women, students will examine the historical, cultural, and social dimensions of African American women's experiences. These writers - winners of National Book Awards, Pulitzer Prizes, and Nobel Prizes for Literature - raise fundamental issues relevant to men and women of all races and ethnicities. The writings of Maya Angelou, Octavia Butler, Rita Dove, Audre Lorde, Terry McMillan, Toni Morrison, Gloria Naylor, Ntozake Shange, Alice Walker, and others will be explored. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Multicultural Perspective (5.3), Humanities (6.0) Offered alternate Spring semesters

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor.
  1. Understand the particular significance of African American women expressing themselves and their expressions being published.
  2. Identify connections between social and cultural histories and common themes in the literature.
  3. Interpret the literature by taking into consideration the biographical backgrounds of the individual writers.
  4. Apply essays by African American women about literature by African American women to analysis of the literature.
  5. Analyze ways in which issues in the literature intersect with the lives of readers.

ENG 258 : Shakespeare: His Plays

This writing-intensive seminar focuses exclusively on the comedies, histories, and tragedies of William Shakespeare. Historical and biographical contexts are considered as students examine the texts from diverse critical perspectives. Writing assignments included analysis of filmed interpretations, live performances, and/or literary criticism. Students may be required to attend one live Shakespearean performance during the semester. Three lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Critically read a Shakespearean play and accommodate for the nuances of Shakespearean grammar.
  2. Distinguish between a history play, a comedy, and a tragedy.
  3. Analyze and respond to filmed and live performances of these plays.
  4. Evaluate literary criticism and determine its usefulness in literary studies.
  5. Apply both analytical and reflective rhetoric in prose and oral communication.
  6. Explain the impact of historical and biographical events during his life on the development of his plays.

ENG 259 : Native American Novels

Students will read widely different novels by award-winning writers who touch on common themes and concerns of Native American experience, while simultaneously suggesting the diversity of that experience. These Blackfeet, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chickasaw, Chippewa, Creek, Gros Ventre, Kiowa, Modoc, and Pueblo writers take control of their own image-making as they explore Native American experiences from before the European invasion to the present. Writers include Michael Dorris, Louise Erdrich, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Gerald Vizenor, James Welch, and others. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Multicultural Perspective (5.3), Humanities (6.0) Offered alternate Fall semesters.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor.
  1. Recognize that Native Americans have had a literature of their own from precolonial times to the present.
  2. Understand that literature by Native American writers both reflects and sustains cultural history.
  3. Identify writing styles and subjects common to literature by Native American writers.
  4. Interpret Native American literature by taking into account the tribal backgrounds and personal experiences of individual Native American writers.
  5. Critique their own assumptions about Native Americans through thoughtful study of the literature.

ENG 260 : Topics in English

This is a one semester course on a specific topic in English. Topics will be announced each semester. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Not offered every year.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor.

ENG 261 : Topics in English-Diversity

This is a one semester course on a specific topic in English, which has been given a cultural diversity designation by the College. Topics will be announced each semester. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Multicultural Perspective (5.3), Humanities (6.0) Not offered every year.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor.
    By the end of the semester, students will develop their abilities to:
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of how literary works by creole writers relate to their immediate historical context and to the traditions from which they emerge.
  2. Understand the theoretical concepts related to ethnicity, class, gender, and language within the context of creole literature.
  3. Utilize problem-based and place-based approaches.
  4. Construct literary arguments using secondary sources (in particular, discipline specific databases and archives) and use MLA style.
  5. Engage in written reflection on the critical assumptions that inform their own and others' interpretations of literary works.

ENG 262 : Tutoring in a Writing Center: A Practicum and Honors Course

This course provides both a theoretical perspective and hands-on experience in the tutoring of writing in a writing center setting. Topics of discussion will cover the full tutoring process, from helping tentative writers generate ideas to providing strategies for working with teacher's comments-as well as reflection on the meaning of peer tutoring and the role of writing centers. A considerable amount of time will be spent reading samples of student writing (representing a range of writers' ability and subjects) and responding to them, as well as engaging in role playing scenarios. Students will be expected to apply what they learn to actual tutoring sessions in the college's writing center. I instructional Support Fee applies. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102. Open to Commonwealth Honors Program students and others with permission of the instructor. Participants will include, but not necessarily be limited to, students currently working in the Writing lab.

ENG 272 : Children's Literature

This course focuses on children's literature over a range of time and place, beginning with the early 19th century into the present and examines issues in the context of the time frame in which the books are written. Through historical and socio-cultural lenses, a wide selection of fiction and non-fiction children's texts will cover issues such as class, race ethnicity, gender roles and gender identity. The course also examines in depth literary concepts in books for children. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor.
  1. Demonstrate knowledge of the history of children's literature and the changes in the genre.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the wide variety of children's literature.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of a variety of literary terms and concepts as they apply to childrens' literature.
  4. Critically read a variety of children's literature texts.
  5. Interpret, evaluate and write critically about these texts.
  6. Establish a broad bibliography of children's literature titles.

ENG 276 : Science Fiction Literature

This writing intensive seminar will introduce students to the genre of science fiction (SF) and the various subgenres associated with it including hard and soft SF, the space fantasy, space opera, comic SF, scientific romance, and cyberpunk through the short story, the novel, film, and other media. Students will focus on the symbolic, psychological, prophetic, and religious dimensions of the genre and understand the role that it plays in addressing political, social, and civic issues from the 1800's to the 21st century. Authors are selected from around the world and from different cultural backgrounds, including Jules Verne, H.G. Wells, Karel Capek, Phillip K. Dick, Ursula K. LeGuin, Douglas Adams, Sakyo Komatsu, and Nalo Hopkinson. Competency Met: Multicultural Perspective (5.3). Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of the instructor.
  1. Differentiate between various subgenres of Science Fiction and understand the role that each plays in the context of world literature.
  2. Appraise the various patterns of symbolism, imagery, and themes throughout the literature.
  3. Critically analyze works of Science Fiction and draw upon the historical and cultural backgrounds of the authors in shaping their analyses.
  4. Explain how Science Fiction has allowed writers to address political and socioeconomic issues through unconventional story telling.
  5. Explicate how Science Fiction is used as a means of exploring the value, purpose, and meaning of the human condition.
  6. Demonstrate a sound knowledge of major global events that have influenced the development of the literary genre from the 1800’s into the 21 century.

ENG 283 : Creative Writing Seminar

Intense practice in writing prose or fiction. This seminar may focus on any of the following according to the instructor's expertise: short stories; longer fiction (novels/novellas); screen writing; biography (including memoir or autobiography) and other writing forms (experimental fiction, graphic novels, hypertext, etc.). A background in writing fundamentals related to the seminar's focus will be included. Readings may be assigned to provide theory and models of the form being written. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Not offered every year.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of the instructor.
  1. Analyze and develop their own creative writing process.
  2. Write within genres designated by the instructor, according to his or her expertise (novel, short story, flash fiction, etc.).
  3. Explore their voice and style as an author
  4. Recognize how their own personal experience can influence their fictional works, and find a comfortable balance between truth and fiction.
  5. Explore and practice the use of fictional elements (point of view, character development, plot, theme, etc.) within a story.
  6. Use sensory detail and vivid imagery to bring a piece of fiction to life.
  7. Use appropriate literary terminology in discussions of both published and peer writing.
  8. Present their manuscripts in a professional format.
  9. Gain confidence and recognize the value of sharing their work with fellow writers.
  10. 1
  11. Discuss the work of others with insight and professionalism, as part of a writing community.