Theatre

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

THE 101 : Introduction to Theatre

This is a fundamental course designed to acquaint students with all phases of theatre. Students will explore the basics of acting, directing, script analysis, playwriting, and design. By engaging in hands on, experiential learning, Students will begin to understand the basic methods and tools of theatre making. This course ultimately wants students to wrestle with the dialectical nature of theatre in pursuit of the truth. Students will come away with an appreciation for how truth in dramatic work is a powerful tool for personal, cultural, and societal development. Conmpetency met: Humanities (6.0), Ethical Dimensions (7.0). Fall; Spring

Credits

3
  1. Analyze plays and performance to be able to locate and name the major turning points, Aristotelian elements, actions, objectives, key circumstances, theme, spine, world pf the play, and translate these into creative choices.
  2. Define, describe and demonstrate the role and function of four major positions of theatre personnel (Actor, Director, Playwright, Designer).
  3. Discuss the role of theatre in society, and the responsibility of the theatre artist in society.
  4. Create and evaluate theatrical material (written, performed, drawn, constructed, devised) based on a deep sense of self, analysis of texts, research, collaboration, and close reading.
  5. Synthesize ideas drawn from various writings, and make bold, innovative and risky creative choices based on the conclusions.

THE 102 : Theatre Colloquium

This course will consist of seminars, visiting artist talks, and workshops to help students explore the tools necessary to be a theatre student in college and the tools necessary to be a theatre artist after college. This course will provide an overview of careers in theatre and the entertainment industry. Students will be exposed to professional and educational resources, audition and interview techniques, and strategies for dealing with the challenges of a life in the arts such as how to budget and strategize when you are a freelance worker. One lecture hour per week.

Credits

1
    Students will be able to:
  1. Take notes and ask crucial questions.
  2. Locate and appropriately utilize college resources and local culture and artistic resources.
  3. Create a personal finance budget.
  4. Locate and appropriately apply for industry related jobs.
  5. Create a personal education and career plan.

THE 110 : Musical Theatre Performance

This course gives students the opportunity to explore the fundamentals of acting as it pertains to musical theatre performance. Students will look at the history, style, and structure of musical theatre, and be able to analyze scores for meaning and interpretation, develop characters, prepare emotionally, and increase physical expression. Up-tempo and ballad solos as well as duets, trios, or quartets will be performed in class. An ensemble number with beginner’s choreography will also be explored and rehearsed in class.

Credits

3

Students will be able to:

  1. Identify the various styles of musical theatre, from English operetta and Jazz Age to rock/pop and jukebox.
  2. Discuss the ways in which style is manifested through performance.
  3. Identify the structural elements of a musical.
  4. Make appropriate performance choices based on the world of the play.
  5. Analyze the character, action, and circumstances within musical theatre scores and choreography.

THE 112 : Introduction to Acting

This course consists of exercises that are designed to provide foundational techniques in the craft of acting. Students will develop the ability to actively listen, pursue characters' objectives in imaginary circumstances, focus, concentrate, relax, increase sensory and emotional awareness, and apply analytical and instinctive methodologies in order to make risky, bold and interesting acting choices. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities; Oral Communication. Fall

Credits

3
  1. Listen and respond appropriately to relevant stimulus.
  2. Analyze plays in order to identify the actions, objectives, circumstances (personal and cultural), core issues, character's worldview, and story structure, and then
  3. communicate this analysis verbally, in writing, and through performance.
  4. Execute the character's actions in proportion to the given circumstances.
  5. Embody the behavior of the character to reveal circumstances and story.
  6. Appropriately create the behavior of the character by using the personal feelings, perceptions and behavior of the actor.

THE 113 : Acting: Scene Study

Designed to prepare the actor to work with the actual text of a play. Scenes will be analyzed from the actor's point of view for meaning and interpretation, character development, physical choices, emotional preparation, and clarity of performance. Scenes will be performed in class. THE 101 and THE 112 recommended, but not required. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities. Spring

Credits

3
  1. Construct a three dimensional physical space that the actor can inhabit.
  2. Analyze plays in order to make specific and detailed acting choices.
  3. Create a character that reconciles the actor's personal worldview and the worldview of their character, as well as the time, place, and cultural realities of the world
  4. of the play when working on a scene .
  5. Act in proper in adjustment to the play, the world of the play, and the moment-to-moment logic of the play.
  6. Justify their choices, both verbally, and in writing.

THE 115 : Director's Workshop

In this course, students will analyze plays from a director's point of view. Rehearsal and organizational procedures will be discussed from script to performance. Working techniques, scene building, blocking and movement, use of space, point of view, and interpretation will provide the student with necessary skills. Directed scenes will be presented in class and/or in studio theatre. Students will be expected to direct scenes. Theatre elective. One three-hour class per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Spring; Day only

Credits

3
  1. To teach the complex craft of theatre from this center perspective of the director’s vision and interpretation.
  2. To refine skills in story-telling, reading and interpretation.
  3. To refine skills in organization, development of ideas, actualization, analysis, movement and composition.
  4. To learn how to articulate, investigate and describe the process of directing.
  5. To develop critical awareness and writing skills that can be used to describe and record the director’s process.
  6. To heighten discernment of artistic and production values.
  7. To teach story building, character development, blocking and use of space and movement to reveal a story and balance the space.
  8. To teach use of design elements and movement to reveal a story.
  9. To develop skills in reading for central vision.

THE 116 : Acting for the Camera

Although the foundation of acting is the same for the stage as it is for the screen, the actor needs specific technique to adapt to the demands of video and film. This course will address specific conditions necessary to acting for the camera. In-class exercises combined with practical experience acting in front of the camera will form the basis of the class. One three-hour class per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall; Day only

Credits

3

THE 117 : Theatre History - The Early Years

This course looks at the evolution of theatre from Ancient Greece to the 17th Century. It is designed for students to be able to draw connections between the issues, beliefs, ideas, and values in various cultures' theatres, and how they have developed through history. There will be reading and some short lectures followed by discussions and in-class exercises. A focus will be placed in examining how the institution of the theatre is a product of, and in service of, the society in which it exists. Competency met: Humanities. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the College's English and reading placement tests or C or better or concurrent enrollment in ENG 091 or ENG 092

  1. Explain connections between human behaviors and historical texts (using both primary and secondary sources).
  2. Analyze the techniques of the theatre practitioners of the past and draw connections between various styles of theatre now and through the centuries.
  3. Identify how theatrical values, belief systems, and institutions have evolved over time, and evaluate their significance and relationship to each other and society.
  4. Identify how theatre reflects the values, belief systems, and institutions of each society in which it is created.
  5. Compare and contrast their own cultural perspectives and alternative global perspectives by analyzing specific characters from classical plays from various cultures.

THE 118 : Theatre History - The Modern Years

This course looks at the evolution of theatre from the 17th century to today. It is designed for students to be able to draw connections between the issues, beliefs, ideas, and values in various cultures' theatres, and how they have developed through history. There will be reading and some short lectures followed by discussion and in-class exercises. A focus will be placed on examining how the institution of the theatre is a product of, and in service, of the society in which it exists. Three lecture hours per week. 3 Credits Fall

Credits

3
  1. Explain connections between human behaviors and the historical consequences of the Enlightenment through the present by comparing plays and various
  2. historical texts (using both primary and secondary sources).
  3. Analyze the techniques of the theatre practitioners of the 18th century to today, and draw connections between theatrical styles and the societies from which they
  4. originated.
  5. Identify how European and American values have evolved since the Enlightenment, and how theatre reflects and/or challenges these values.
  6. Compare and contrast one's own cultural perspectives with an alternative global perspective from various historical figures and characters from plays.

THE 119 : Attending the Play

This course is designed for those who wish to acquire a basic understanding of how to view a play and is intended for the general student population. Students will attend various types of productions ranging from college theatre to community theatre to professional theatre, followed by in-class discussion. Performing artists, theatre designers, technicians and related theatre personnel will be invited to discuss their particular area of production. Students will also read about and discuss theatre in its various forms. Three class hours a week. Additional time is required for attending plays. For non-theatre majors. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Not offered every year

Credits

3

THE 120 : Costume Design for the Stage

This workshop covers the basics of formulating costume designs for stage productions. Students will learn to analyze texts, research styles, render drawings, choose fabrics, and prepare finished costume designs. Character analysis, sewing and alteration techniques, and accessorizing will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on BCC's mainstage productions for hands-on experience. One three-hour class per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Not offered every year

Credits

3

THE 121 : Voice Production

Fundamentals of vocal training, concentrating on relaxation and exercise techniques to free the voice, center breathing, expand vocal range, strengthen projection, express emotion, refine articulation, and to focus the voice into the resonating and amplifying areas of the body. Techniques to maintain vocal health during production will also be taught. One three-hour class per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall

Credits

3

THE 122 : Theatre Rehearsal and Performance (Fall)

This hands-on course, designed to bring the actor onstage for a public performance, focuses on artistic areas of the rehearsal process. Students develop advanced acting technique by performing before an audience for an extended run, sometimes also going to other local stages. Once the play is decided, students must audition for parts. The course explores play analysis, character development, and cultural/historical setting. The final project includes a written analysis of the student's own work in relation to the production and a study of one specific aspect of the production. The course involves additional rehearsal time. It may be taken again as THE 123. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall

Credits

4

THE 123 : Theatre Rehearsal and Performance (Spring)

This hands-on course, designed to bring the actor onstage for a public performance, focuses on artistic areas of the rehearsal process. Students develop advanced acting technique by performing before an audience for an extended run, sometimes also going to other local stages. Once the play is decided, students must audition for parts. The course explores play analysis, character development, and cultural/historical setting. The final project includes a written analysis of the student's own work in relation to the production and a study of one specific aspect of the production. The course involves additional rehearsal time. It may be taken again as THE 122. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Spring

Credits

3
    Intended to function as a practical, a laboratory, where students receive hands-on experience in weaving together all elements of theatre by rehearsing and performing two plays per semester. Students present a portfolio project (a Scrapbook), following each show, to articulate their experience with visual, literary, and photographic evidence of the process of bringing all of the elements of theatre together to produce a whole event to be performed before a live audience.

  1. To build confidence, flexibility, collaboration skills, and team spirit.
  2. To sensitize the actor to the source of dramatic building and dramatic technique.
  3. To teach and maintain a sense of discipline, range, cooperation, and play necessary to building a play or working in any ensemble or productive artistic environment.
  4. To develop critical skills concerning the student’s process and the understanding of the work as a whole by creating portfolio projects that require an ongoing rehearsal journal which will be read during class hours in preparation for the midterm and final required scrapbooks.
  5. To teach play building by either creating new work (devised pieces) or mounting existing work on either of two stages: STUDIO THEATRE (75 seat); MAIN STAGE PROSCENIUM THEATRE (700 seat) to be presented before a live audience.
  6. To allow students to experience, first-hand, the elements of theatre and how they work together.
  7. To teach students, first-hand, the language of theatre and how it is used to present our human experience on this Earth.

THE 124 : Theatre Design

Students will explore the fundamentals of how to analyze, research, and interpret a piece of dramatic text for the purpose of making design choices. An overview of props, scenery, lighting, sound, and costume design will be covered. Students will learn how to make bold and innovative choices that are informed by a global understanding of plays and the social and cultural values in which they were created. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3
    Students will be able to:
  1. Analyze plays for the purpose of creating designs.
  2. Research cultural, historical, and aesthetic elements of the world of the play, and make choices that reflect the complexity and nuance of the thematic elements of
  3. the play.
  4. Make risky, bold, yet appropriate design choices that reveal story, character, circumstance, metaphor and theme.
  5. Defend artistic choices verbally and in writing.
  6. Strategize the initial stages of a design process.

THE 125 : Sound Design and Production

This course provides a hands-on foundation in the practical and artistic use of sound to support theatre and visual arts productions. It focuses on the development of sound-scapes, the use of technical equipment in the production of sound, and the translation of visual, emotional, and written ideas into supportive sound environments. It explores sound production from various sources: natural sound, technically-produced sound, composition from natural objects and musical instruments. Students produce projects specifically suited to theater and visual arts. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall, Spring

Credits

3

THE 127 : Scenic Design

This course gives students a basic understanding of scenic design for the stage. It includes hands-on work in such areas as knowledge and application of safety rules, use of tools and equipment, basic carpentry skills, design and preparation of scale models, analysis of text for design, translation of artistic concept to stage areas and spatial relationships. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall

Credits

3

THE 128 : Lighting Design

This course gives students a basic understanding of lighting design for the stage. It includes hands-on work in such areas as knowledge and application of basic safety rules; use of tools and equipment; basic knowledge of electricity; basic knowledge of lighting instruments and their specific applications; preparation from text of lighting plot; translation of artistic concept to illumination, intensity, color, angle focus, and actualization. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Spring

Credits

3

THE 132 : Theatre Production (Fall)

This is a hands-on course where the student experiences all aspects of technical production and focuses specifically on one or two areas. Students work backstage in one or two of several theatrical areas such as set construction, lighting, sound, costume, mask-making, props, and/or running crews for two shows per semester. The student may have the opportunity to design or apprentice under the designer in addition to working tech. The course requires additional rehearsal time. Students must prepare to put in extra hours working on their respective projects. Work in more than one area may be required from each student depending on the show and the availability of additional help. The course may be taken again as THE 133. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall

Credits

4

THE 133 : Theatre Production (Spring)

This is a hands-on course where the student experiences all aspects of technical production and focuses specifically on one or two areas. Students work backstage in one or two of several theatrical areas such as set construction, lighting, sound, costume, mask-making, props, and/or running crews for two shows per semester. The student may have the opportunity to design or apprentice under the designer in addition to working tech. The course requires additional rehearsal time. Students must prepare to put in extra hours working on their respective projects. Work in more than one area may be required from each student depending on the show and the availability of additional help. The course may be taken again as THE 132. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Spring

Credits

4

THE 134 : Puppet/Mask Workshop

This is a hands-on course exploring design techniques, materials, and practical stage use in creating masks and puppets for the theatre. Students create masks and puppet characters in different styles. A variety of construction and design techniques are explored. Students learn historical contexts stemming from ritual, dance, and theatrical performance. Movement and staging is emphasized. Opportunity for work to be applied for stage productions is offered. Three lecture hours per week. Fall Not offered every year.

Credits

3

THE 135 : Stagecraft (Fall)

This is a hands-on course designed to give students a practical and theoretical understanding of the tools and techniques used in the technical building of a stage production. Students gain experience by working backstage on crews concerned with set construction: basic carpentry, electric, painting, lighting, sound, costume, props, and stage management. Students learn to use Vectorworks, a basic computer drafting program used in scenic design. Students are required to work on tech crews for both the Studio Theatre and Main Stage productions, two shows per semester. Students spend 10 to 15 hours a week working backstage. Students also attend a one-hour weekly seminar to learn practical skills. The course may be taken again as Stagecraft (Spring). One lecture hour and 10 to 15 hours per week working backstage. Fall

Credits

2
  1. Demonstrate understanding of safety procedures and backstage protocol.
  2. Participate in two productions as backstage production crews.
  3. Maintain a regular, complete portfolio/journal detailing skills learned in each production.
  4. Demonstrate ability to work on crews, perform basic construction, mounting, costume craft, and running crew skills to support theatrical performance.
  5. Show ability to use Vectorworks, a basic computer drafting program that can be applied to theater sets.
  6. Using the internet, students will identify theater sets and how they were constructed based on plans created by software.

THE 136 : Stagecraft (Spring)

This is a hands-on course designed to give students a practical and theoretical understanding of the tools and techniques used in the technical building of a stage production. Students gain experience by working backstage on crews concerned with basic carpentry, electrics, painting, lighting, sound, costume, props, and stage management. Students are required to work on tech crews for productions. Students spend 10 to 15 hours a week working backstage. Students also attend a three-hour weekly seminar to learn practical skills. Three lecture hours and 10 to 15 hours per week working backstage. Spring

Credits

3
  1. Apply analytical and quantitative principles while designing and constructing scenery, properties, costumes, lighting and sound.
  2. Interpret working drawings in order to construct scenery and costumes.
  3. Utilize the appropriate materials and hardware necessary for scenic and costume construction.
  4. Plan the construction of scenery, costumes, properties, lighting, or sound designs based on the reading of scripts.
  5. Construct scenery, props, costumes, lighting or sound used for theatrical purposes on Bristol's main stage production.

THE 212 : Acting: Voice, Movement, and Style

Students will explore how an actor uses an awareness of self to build up to the vocal, physical, and stylistic demands of the text and the character. Students will engage in vocal and physical exercises that increase resonance, relaxation, balance, flexibility and sensitivity to impulse and the imagination. The class will focus on scenes, monologues, and projects that deal with heightened language and situations, such as material by Shakespeare, Brecht, Churchill, Ionesco, and Albee. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Students will be able to:

  1. Perform techniques that eliminate unnecessary tension and increase vocal resonance. 
  2. Demonstrate increase balance, flexibility, and range of motion in comparison to student's original capacity.  
  3. Align vocal and physical expression with the moment-to-moment reality on stage.
  4. Apply personal motivations to the performance of specified plays and characters.  
  5. Apply Viewpoints work, the Michael Chekhov Technique, and Linklater Voice work to the performance of specified plays and characters.

THE 213 : Acting: Theatre to Film

This course will begin to acquaint the actor with the challenges that stem from the different environments where performances can occur. Students will perform scenes and monologues in a variety of settings (a large proscenium theatre, a small black box theatre, and on-camera) to explore how performance can be calibrated in a way that honors truthful moment-to-moment behavior while meeting the needs of the medium. Three lecture hours per week. , Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

THE 112, THE 113, or permission of Program Coordinator.
    Students will be able to:
  1. Adjust their performance to suit the needs of specific performance conditions, without compromising the internal life of their character.
  2. Construct performances from a deep and complex connection to the character.
  3. Identify and solve acting issues that get in the way of maximal performance of the actor.
  4. Construct a personal process that makes the actor self-sufficient.
  5. Develop a sense of discernment in their own choices and the work of others.

THE 214 : Playwriting

This will be a process-based course in which students will learn to create original writing for the stage. Students will come away with an understanding of the basic building blocks of dramatic writing and dramatic structure: action, objective, circumstance, inciting incident, turning points, crisis, climax, etc. Students will learn how to bring themselves to their writing, and develop their personal voice. Students will increase their ability to sense what is authentic in their own work and the work of others, and to then generate work that is bold, original, risky and truthful. Competency met: Humanities. Three lecture hours per week. , Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

    Students will be able to:
  1. Write plays that are based in dramatic action and informed by complex layers of circumstance and character.
  2. Apply principles of dramatic structure to construct later drafts of work.
  3. Develop a sense of authenticity, storytelling, moment-to-moment logic, and societal relevance in creating and revising work.
  4. Conceptualize and use the tools specific to the theatre in their writing.
  5. Locate problems and weaknesses in their own and others writing, and to communicate them effectively.

THE 290 : Theatre Capstone

Students will pull together a portfolio documenting all of the required production work done in the Bristol Theatre Program including acting, directing, stage-managing, designing, playwriting, run-crews, and front-of-the-house. Students will be asked to include written critiques and reflections of their work, pictures, video, sound recordings, scripts, prompt books, or anything that reflects the work done in their time at Bristol. Students will defend their work after a final presentation at the end of the semester. Spring

Credits

1

Prerequisites

    Students will be able to:
  1. Critique current and past work, and strategize for future success.
  2. Explain artistic intent and describe artistic outcome.
  3. Draw connections between various experiences and synthesize meaning from them.
  4. Describe future intent and discuss the process to achieve stated goals.
  5. Demonstrate participation in Bristol Theatre Program productions: acting work, design work, and/or stage management of at least three productions. Run-Crew
  6. for at least one production.