Engineering

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

EGR 102 : Introduction to Sustainable and Green Energy Technologies

This course is designed to introduce students to emerging renewable energy technologies and sustainable building design practices. Both the practical applications and underlying theories are addressed. Topics include: The Construction/Engineering Design and Implementation Process, Green Building Practices, especially those related to Energy Efficiency, Environmental Conservation, and Resource Management, Wind Turbines, Solar Energy, and other forms of renewable energy. Three hours of lecture per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Describe different aspects of Green Technology.
  2. Utilize the steps of the construction/engineering design process.
  3. Demonstrate Design, Project &Time Management Skills.
  4. Describe and evaluate Renewable Energy Sources and Technologies.
  5. Describe and evaluate Green Building Practices and Technologies.
  6. Describe and evaluate Environmental Conservation and Resource Management Methods.

EGR 103 : Computer Skills for Engineers and Technicians

This course is an introduction to the personal computer and its application to engineering and technical communication and problem solving. Topics include Windows, email communication, Web-based research, word processing, computer graphics, spreadsheets, and presentation software. Students develop the computer skills necessary for successful academic and professional careers, including the creation of effective technical messages, reports and presentations using charts, equations, graphs, scanned information, and transferred data, as well as problem solving using integrated flowchart analysis concepts. Three class hours a week in the CAD lab. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) NOTE: Utilizes Windows based software Mac versions available. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
  1. Navigate in a Microsoft Windows environment.
  2. Choose various modes of communication, such as social, hangout/Skype, calendars and educational web platforms (e-learning/e-portfolio) to effectively corroborate and schedule with teammates and instructors within the BCC electronic classroom.
  3. Research engineering and technology topics using web-based resources.
  4. Produce written engineering documents, such as lab reports and technical papers, using word processing software.
  5. Setup spreadsheets and create graphs.
  6. Produce illustration using computer graphics from within a word processor.
  7. Create presentation utilizing images and data from other sources.
  8. Demonstrate problem solving skills using computer solutions.

EGR 111 : Fundamentals of Manual Machining

This course covers the fundamentals of manual machine tool utilization. Topics include milling, turning, knurling, threading, surfacing grinding, tooling, feeds and speeds, blueprint reading, layout, proper tolerancing, metrology, and manufacturing processes. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4
  1. Mill, turn, and grind common materials to create features specified by a mechanical drawing.
  2. Read mechanical drawings and verify drawing dimensions on their machined project utilizing various metrology tools and procedures.
  3. Select correct hand and machine tools and calculate feeds and speeds for various machining processes.
  4. Demonstrate safe machine shop practices per OSHA and Industrial standards.

EGR 112 : Automated Machining

This course is a continuation of EGR 111 and covers modern, advanced machining processes using Computerized Numerical Control (CNC) for both milling and turning. It also discusses best practices for safety, tooling, setup and process sheets. Students use industrial software simulations and feeds and speeds databases. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. NOTE: Utilizes Windows based software only. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EGR 111 is recommended.
  1. Write standard Fanuc CNC (Computer Numeric Code) for milling and turning common materials to create features specified by a mechanical drawing.
  2. Setup and operate vertical machining and turning centers that are common to the local industry.
  3. Demonstrate proper set-up, download of computer numerical code and first piece prove out procedures for the in Fanuc Vertical Milling and Turning machine centers.
  4. Generate manufacturing documentations consisting of tool list, operation sheets and drawings.
  5. Demonstrate safe machine shop practices per OSHA and Industrial standards.

EGR 113 : Introduction to Robotics

This is an introduction to the science of Robotics and is designed for non-engineering and engineering students. Students must understand how scientific innovation can affect their lives either directly or indirectly while researching the history of robotics and the ethical role of robotics in the modern world. Scientific inquiry is applied while building robots and testing design challenges. Students test physical constructs and analyze performance in a systematic and documented process. Physical science and programming are utilized to design and evaluate robots to complete weekly challenges. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery, Ethical Dimensions Fall

Credits

4
  1. Apply scientific knowledge in the designing and testing of various robot challenges.
  2. Research the history and applications of robotics to distinguish the various uses, components, and designs of modern robots.
  3. Interpret ethical questions on the use of robotics in a modern society and discuss the merits of differing views.

EGR 115 : Manufacturing Processes & Measurement

This course focuses on manufacturing and measuring processes and equipment. Quality principles, theories and analysis will be untilized in the evaluation of processes and equipment. The course will describe and discuss various applications, equipment specification, processes and capabilities. Various measuring techniques and gauging equipment will be explained with the focus of selecting the proper gauging for the application and product specification requirements. Students in this course are expected to be computer literate. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
    Students will be able to:
  1. Discuss and demonstrate various Manufacturing and Measurement processes, equipment and applications.
  2. Compare and assess process and equipment capability in the producion of various end products.
  3. Utilize quality principles, theories and analysis in the evaluation of processes and equipment.

EGR 123 : Green Building Practices

This course studies the methods, materials, and equipment currently used in the construction of residential and commercial buildings, roads, and highways. Students learn the proper use, selection, specifications, strength and limitations, fire resistance, and code conformity of basic construction materials and fabrication processes. The laboratory will include fieldwork and basic laboratory testing procedures. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Fall.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Intermediate Algebra competency or concurrent enrollment in MTH 152.
  1. Outline building construction practices and materials.
  2. Describe green building materials and practices.
  3. Identify the benefits of sustainable design.
  4. Evaluate a home or building design to determine if it qualifies for LEED certification.
  5. Take the LEED Green Associates exam.

EGR 124 : Soils and Foundations

This course introduces students to geotechnical engineering. Engineering soil properties, mass/volume relationships, soil classification systems, and site exploration methods are included. In addition, structural foundations are explored. Three lecture hours a week. Spring

Credits

3
  1. Determine engineering soil properties.
  2. Calculate mass-volume-weight relationships for soils.
  3. Produce and interpret grain size distribution curves for soils.
  4. Classify soils for design and construction purposes using standard soil classification systems.
  5. Identify various types of structural foundations.

EGR 125 : Construction Estimating

This course introduces students to common practices used in estimating construction quantities and costs, including materials, labor, equipment, overhead, and profit. Productivity, efficiency, and project scheduling are also included. Three class hours a week. Fall

Credits

3
  1. Read and interpret construction plans.
  2. Perform quantity take-offs from engineering plans.
  3. Estimate construction material, labor and equipment costs.
  4. Distinguish between direct and indirect costs.
  5. Prepare construction bids.

EGR 131 : Introduction to Electrical Circuits

This course is an introduction to DC electrical circuits. It examines physics and laws of voltage, current, and power; series and parallel direct current circuit analysis. It includes equivalent circuit concepts, and methods of DC circuit analysis including Mesh and Nodal Analysis. Network theorems, including Thevenin's, Norton's and Superposition are also examined. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Intermediate Algebra Competency or concurrent enrollment in MTH 152.

  1. Utilize mathematical concepts required to solve DC circuits.
  2. Conduct circuit analysis on series and parallel DC circuits.
  3. Develop the ability to apply Ohms law to analyze simple one loop circuits to complex mesh circuits utilizing network theorems such as Thevenin, Norton and superposition.
  4. Discuss principles of transient capacitive and inductive circuits.

EGR 132 : Electrical Circuits

Students study advanced AC and DC circuit analysis methods, network theorems, and the analysis and principles associated with capacitors and inductors. Phasers, filters, three-phase systems, transformers, motors, the power triangle, and power factor correction are also covered in this course.Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Describe DC/AC electric circuit operation.
  2. Solve complex circuit analysis problems.
  3. Troubleshoot Circuit.
  4. Utilize computer simulation software.

EGR 133 : Computer Configuration and Repair

This hands-on course covers PC components and PC configuration. Students use system diagnostics to analyze and repair PC system faults. The course emphasizes troubleshooting and replacing individual system components such as memory, hard drives, floppy drives, video cards, and modems. This hardware approach provides real-world computer repair and maintenance experience. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall

Credits

4
  1. Identify & describe past and present PC architecture and components.
  2. Demonstrate troubleshooting skills to solve common PC problems.
  3. Use computer terminology fluently.
  4. Reed and utilize appropriate manufacturers data sheets.
  5. Develop hands on skills to disassemble, replace, or install all functional PC components.
  6. Utilize the Internet for PC related information research.

EGR 137 : Digital Electronics

The course examines number systems with particular emphasis on binary, octal, and hexadecimal counting methods. The course stresses Boolean algebra with function minimization including logic design and logic circuits for all computer elements, including the arithmetic, control, memory, and I/O system sections. Particular emphasis is given to bus-structured microprocessor-based systems. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Intermediate Algebra Competency or concurrent enrollment in MTH 152.

  1. Describe and analyze digital components and designs required in computer hardware and communication systems.
  2. Use terminology and timing diagrams proficiently.
  3. Read and interpret appropriate manufacturers data sheets.
  4. Use Electronics Workbench Multisim application software to model basic digital electronics.

EGR 140 : OSHA 40-Hour Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER)

This course provides educational background and skills required by personnel involved in hazardous waste operations. It includes the required components of the 40-hour, off site training requirement for hazardous waste site workers as defined in the Code of Federal Regulations, 29 CFR 1910.120. This level of training is required, by law, for all employees working at a hazardous waste site who will be exposed to hazardous substances, health hazards, or safety hazards. Personnel who will benefit from this course include: equipment operators, general laborers, and others, as well as on-site management and supervisors directly responsible for, or who supervise employees engaged in, hazardous waste operations. Topics covered will include: hazardous waste regulations, chemical, physical, and biological hazards, toxicology, medical surveillance and first aid requirements, selection, use and care of personal protective equipment, proper handling of wastes stored in drums, confined space entry, and other safety procedures. A field mock up exercise will also be conducted. Students completing this course and successfully passing the certification exam given at the end of the course will receive the official OSHA certification of their completion of this course. Three lecture hours per week. Not offered every year.

Credits

3
  1. Work safely in a hazardous waste operations environment.
  2. Chose the proper personal protective equipment for the situation and care of the equipment.
  3. Understand the hazardous waste regulations and chemical, physical and biological hazards associated with hazardous waste operations and emergencies responses.
  4. Properly handle hazardous waste stored in drums.
  5. Enter confined spaces safely.
  6. Conduct proper lock out/ tag out procedures for electrical equipment.
  7. Obtain OSHA 40 hour HAZWOPER certification.

EGR 141 : Introduction to Environment

This course is designed to examine the impact of human activities on the natural world in the context of our emerging awareness of the scope of environmental problems and against the background of our understanding of normal ecosystems. The focus will be on topics concerning population, agriculture, energy, air pollution, water resources and waste management. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall

Credits

3
  1. Define what environmental science is and why it is considered interdisciplinary.
  2. Identify some of the important environmental concerns we face today.
  3. Explain what sustainable development is and how it relates to society.
  4. Understand the Scientific Method and how it is used to study the environment.
  5. Apply critical thinking to evaluate what is sound science.
  6. Apply analytical skills, models, and statistics to the study of the environment.
  7. Understand the concept of systems and their importance in environmental science.
  8. Explain the processes which shape the earth including the rock cycle, plate tectonics, and global air and water circulation patterns.
  9. Follow the movement of water and nutrients through the biological, chemical and geological systems on the planet.
  10. Define population, community, ecosystem, biome and biosphere and understand their relationships.
  11. Follow the movement of energy on the planet through biotic and abiotic systems.
  12. Explain the concept of evolution and how it is the thread that links all forms of life together.
  13. Understand our past, present and future uses of energy and the consequences of our actions.
  14. Understand the concept of climate change and its causes and consequences.

EGR 143 : Conceptual Math for Environmental Technicians

This course is designed to provide the Environmental Technician with the mathematical skills necessary to carry out the calculation involved in the operation and management of water systems. This course will also prepare students for the mathematical requirements of the state drinking water and wastewater certification examinations. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
  2. Perform basic mathematical operations.
  3. Manipulate mathematical formulas to solve problems.
  4. Solve word problems dealing with actual plant operations.
  5. Use the metric system as well as the English system.

EGR 145 : Computerized Systems in the Water Treatment Industry

This course will introduce students to Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), the Computerized Maintenance Management Systems (CMMS), Water Information Management Solutions (WIMS), and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
  2. Describe the many ways that computers are integrated into the operation of water systems.
  3. Explain the benefits and functions of a Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS)
  4. List the functions of a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA)
  5. List the functions of a Water Information Management System (WIMS)
  6. List the components of a SCADA system.
  7. Create basic maps using Geographic Information System (GIS) Software
  8. Prepare inventory lists and job orders.
  9. Perform data input and process control calculations.
  10. Use trending data to assist in process control decisions.

EGR 151 : Electrical Machinery

This course studies the principles of AC and DC circuits including electromagnetic induction and power factor, AC motor principles including inductive and synchronous type machines and DC series, shunt, and compound wound devices. Motor starting and speed control are also covered from an operational point of view. Three class hours a week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Intermediate Algebra competency or concurrent enrollment in MTH 152.

  1. Demonstrate the fundamentals of simple AC&DC circuit analysis and troubleshooting.
  2. Apply system analysis in industrial applications.
  3. Explain the function and use of various industrial transformers, voltage regulators, switches, resistors, capacitors, inductors and AC& DC motors.
  4. Demonstrate safe electrical practices, such as lock out, tag out, per OSHA and Industrial standards.

EGR 171 : Fluid Systems

This subject deals with engineering principles associated with the control and usage of fluids. Particular emphasis is placed on the concepts of work and power and how they apply to the design and troubleshooting of hydraulic and pneumatic devices and systems (circuits). Pumps, compressors, actuators, valves, gauges, conductors, and automated equipment are analyzed in both the class and laboratory. The course also covers the use of ISO Fluid Power Symbols and Standards. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Intermediate Algebra competency or concurrent enrollment in MTH 152.

  1. Identify and describe safety survival equipment for use on board vessels.
  2. Identify, describe and use marine safety procedures both on the dock and at sea.
  3. Use actual safety equipment and procedures in water experiences.
  4. Demonstrate firefighting basics, dewatering skills, and skills to deal with emergencies at sea.

EGR 172 : Material Science

A study of the physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of materials. The course places particular emphasis on the interdependency of atomic structure, microstructure, material phase relationships, and solid state reactions to each other and to the modification of these properties. It investigates the use of metals, plastics and advanced materials in economic, sustainable, and reliable design. The laboratory includes metallographic examination using light microscopy and the study of material science principles and treatments of metals. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall

Credits

4
  1. Define and describe chemical and physical bonding, how it relates to the micro and macrostructure of materials, and how these relate to its material properties.
  2. Apply these relationships to materials with known bonding and material structure to determine material properties.
  3. Utilize experimental material testing techniques for determining material properties.
  4. Apply basic metallographic and light microscopy techniques for microstructure analysis of materials including preparation and analysis material samples.
  5. Illustrate the benefits and limitations associated with many categories of engineering materials.
  6. Describe how material properties can be modified by treatments designed to change material structure.
  7. Apply material science to design techniques used to create safe, economic, and reliable products.

EGR 182 : Wind Industry Safety

This course is designed to provide the basic skills to work in a safe manner in the wind industry and to meet emergency response training requirements for individuals new to the global wind industry. It will equip students with the knowledge, skills and confidence to appropriately respond in the event of an emergency and to increase their safety through proper use of Personal Protective Equipment and other emergency equipment and procedures. One lecture hour and three laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

2

Prerequisites

Good health and the ability to climb 25 to 50 meters.

  1. Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:
  2. Understand safety regulations and have demonstrated emergency safety procedures associate with working offshore, in confined spaces and at height.
  3. Understand and have demonstrated how to access, work, egress, and rescue personnel from confined spaces safely including toxic and hazardous environments.
  4. Understand and have demonstrated proper and safe use of ladders, lift systems and the lifting of loads.
  5. Understand the hazards and risks associated with working at height and understand and have demonstrated the safety equipment (harnesses, lanyards arrestors, etc.) and at height rescue procedures.
  6. Understand and have demonstrated proper fire awareness and fire-fighting techniques on wind turbines and in general.

EGR 183 : Energy Efficiency and Conservation Measures

This course is designed to give students the skills to identify and understand energy efficiency and conservation methods used to reduce energy consumption. Students analyze residential and commercial facilities for opportunities to employ these energy-saving measures. Students become familiar with the use of energy monitoring and measuring equipment used for energy auditing. Students also learn to calculate energy savings and determine environmental impacts of these energy saving methods. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support fee applies. Fall

Credits

3
  1. Explain energy efficiency and conservation methods available for energy use reduction in residential and commercial settings.
  2. Demonstrate energy savings and environmental impacts for most energy efficiency methods in order to identify and assess energy conservation opportunities.
  3. Demonstrate the appropriate usage of energy monitoring and measuring equipment commonly used by energy specialists and energy auditors.

EGR 190 : Technical Projects

This course guides the student in the design and development of a useful technical project. The student develops a functioning design solution and generates all necessary support drawings and documentation. Spring

Credits

3
  1. Utilize technical tools and methods to solve complex real world design problems using a site-based learning approach.
  2. Work in an organized environment with specific educational goals.
  3. Solve complex problems which require integrating many technical aspects.

EGR 204 : Engineering Applications of MATLAB

This course continues the study of MATLAB and discusses the built-in commands and functions. It emphasizes the mathematical capabilities of MATLAB to solve engineering problems that students encounter in their first two years of college. The students also learn programming techniques that allow them to develop their own MATLAB application programs containing interactive prompts as well as user-defined graphic outputs. One lecture hour and one laboratory hour per week. Spring

Credits

1

Prerequisites

  1. Utilize basic MATLAB commands, functions and elements (matrices & others).
  2. Apply the built-in functional capabilities to solve engineering problems encountered within the first two years of an engineering program.
  3. Develop an application program that demonstrates the basic concepts of logic and program control.
  4. Develop user-defined programs and graphical outputs with interactive prompts using programming techniques.

EGR 211 : Programmable Control Systems

This course will provide students with the knowledge of digital systems and the skills required to install, program, operate and troubleshoot automated industrial equipment. It will concentrate on the use of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), robotics and the associated proximity sensors and actuators (hydraulic and pneumatic). Additionally, this course will introduce a variety of automation methods and equipment including microprocessors, vision systems and motor controls. Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week. NOTE: Utilizes Windows based software only. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Program PLCs, microprocessors and robots using ladder diagrams and PC interfaces.
  2. Use binary logic systems, Logic Gates, Boolean Algebra, Flip-Flops, Shift Registers, Timers and Counters in Digital Systems.
  3. Describe the utilization and applications of limit switches, proximity sensors, ultrasonic sensor and photo-switch sensors.
  4. Define terminology and utilization of Robots, PLCs and other forms of automated equipment in industry, including reliability and economics.
  5. Explain the basic design and function of Microprocessors and Microcomputers.

EGR 215 : Lean Six Sigma

This course focuses on "Lean Manufacturing" methodology utilizing the fundamentals of "Six Sigma." Students are provided with the tools that enable the identification, measurement, and elimination of non-value-added activities in a manufacturing setting. Students develop a working knowledge of the best practices in quality and process management. Students in this course are expected to be computer-literate. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MTH 119 recommended.

  1. Students will be able to discuss and demonstrate various Lean theory and applications.
  2. Students will collect data, calculate and compare information to assess process and equipment capability using six sigma processes.
  3. Students will recognize various ISO standards and explain the value of the various requirements within the international industry standards.

EGR 221 : Surveying I

The study of the theory and practice of plane surveying with specific applications to civil engineering. Topics will include measurement theory and errors, distance measurement, leveling, bearings, azimuths, traverses, area determinations, stadia, topographic surveys, horizontal and vertical curves, and other related topics. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

None. MTH 172 recommended.

  1. Demonstrate the ability to properly use and care for common surveying equipment.
  2. Identify sources of error in surveying projects.
  3. Accurately and precisely lay out and measure angles, distances and elevations in the field.
  4. Properly record surveying field notes.
  5. Correctly perform surveying office calculations.

EGR 222 : Surveying II

This course is a continuation of EGR 221 Surveying I. It includes topics such as highway curves, highway construction surveys, municipal street construction surveys, pipelines and tunnels, land surveys, construction quantity measurement and final surveys. A variety of surveying equipment and tools will be utilized in this course. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

  1. Demonstrate the ability to properly use and care for common surveying equipment.
  2. Read and interpret engineering plans and land maps.
  3. Accurately and precisely layout and measure angles, curves, distances and elevations in the field.
  4. Properly record surveying field notes.
  5. Design and layout horizontal and vertical curves.
  6. Correctly perform surveying office calculations.

EGR 226 : Legal Aspects of Boundary Surveying

This introductory course covers land surveyor ethics and professional responsibility, real property law, real and record evidence, conveyances, recording systems, legal aspects of boundary establishment, unwritten title, easements, prescription, water boundaries and surveying plans. The course will be offered completely online. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EGR 221 or permission of instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
  1. Perform the legal research necessary to discover record evidence of property boundaries
  2. Read, interpret, record evidence
  3. Identify real evidence affecting boundary locations
  4. Reconcile record and physical evidence where conflicts exists
  5. Analyze and identify unwritten title and prescription and its effects on ownership
  6. Evaluate the nature of water boundaries
  7. Differentiate between express and implied easements

EGR 231 : Electrical Engineering I

Basic electrical theory and techniques of electrical circuit analysis for engineering transfer students. Topics include resistive circuits, independent and dependent sources, analysis methods, network theories, energy-storage elements, RC and RL circuits, second order circuits, sinusoidal excitation and phasers. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MTH 215 with a C- or better.

Corequisites

  1. Apply formulas for current, charge voltage, energy and power in the solution of applied problems including the power balance equation.
  2. Apply Kirchoff’s laws and other axioms and definitions to determine the voltage and currents in simple circuits and to analyze the general single-loop or series circuits.
  3. Use derived equivalent components to reduce more complicated networks to equivalent series or parallel circuits.
  4. Apply node-voltage analysis & mesh-current analysis approaches to network analysis.
  5. Apply the properties of linearity and time invariance associated with input-output equations in simplifying network analysis.
  6. Apply characteristics of operational amplifiers (OP AMP) and the concept of negative feedback.
  7. Describe signal models and signal characterizations as applied to electrical engineering.
  8. Apply differential equation definitions to solve the response of source-free circuits.
  9. Analyze circuits which include independent sources (drivers) and to solve differential equations describing the circuits.

EGR 232 : Electrical Engineering II

This course continues Electrical Engineering I (EGR 231). Topics include AC steady state power, three-phase circuits, complex frequency, network functions, frequency response, transformers, Fourier series, Laplace transforms, and Laplace transform application. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

EGR 231 with a C or better;

Corequisites

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  1. Describe the sinusoidal steady-state conditions through use of the concepts of phasor, impedance, admittance, and transfer function
  2. Find the amplitude and phases of sinusoidal steady-state response waveforms by algebraic techniques
  3. Analyze the flow of energy in AC circuits
  4. Define power (P), reactive power (Q), and complex power(S)
  5. Define the concept of frequency response curves and use Bode plots to them.
  6. Understand the concepts of resonance, complex frequency, and poles and zeros in the development of frequency response
  7. Understand and apply Fourier series in the analysis of circuits
  8. Decompose input waveform into a sum of mutually orthogonal sinusoidal waveform components
  9. Develop the limit of the Fourier series as the inverse Fourier transform and apply the direct Fourier transform of a signal in the transformation of time-domain signals to its frequency-domain representation.

     

EGR 233 : Electrical Engineering I Laboratory

This course provides experience in experimental techniques, laboratory report preparation, familiarization and use of instrumentation, passive circuit investigations, and computer modeling experiments. Three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

1

Corequisites

  1. Apply formulas for current, charge voltage, energy and power in the solution of applied problems including the power balance equation.
  2. Apply Kirchoff’s laws and other axioms and definitions to determine the voltage and currents in simple circuits and to analyze the general single-loop or series circuits.
  3. Use derived equivalent components to reduce more complicated networks to equivalent series or parallel circuits.
  4. Apply node-voltage analysis & mesh-current analysis approaches to network analysis.
  5. Apply the properties of linearity and time invariance associated with input-output equations in simplifying network analysis.
  6. Apply characteristics of operational amplifiers (OP AMP) and the concept of negative feedback.
  7. Describe signal models and signal characterizations as applied to electrical engineering.
  8. Apply differential equation definitions to solve the response of source-free circuits.
  9. Analyze circuits which include independent sources (drivers) and to solve differential equations describing the circuits.

EGR 234 : Electrical Engineering II Laboratory

Students gain hands-on experience with experimentation in passive circuit investigations, steady-state and transient analysis, electrical instruments, magnetic and logic circuit investigations, and computer modeling experiments. Three laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

1

Corequisites

  1. Describe the sinusoidal steady-state conditions through use of the concepts of phasor, impedance, admittance, and transfer function.
  2. Find the amplitude and phases of sinusoidal steady-state response waveforms by algebraic techniques.
  3. Analyze the flow of energy in AC circuits.
  4. Define power (P), reactive power (Q), and complex power (S).
  5. Define the concept of frequency response curves and use Bode plots to them.
  6. Understand the concepts of resonance, complex frequency, and poles and zeros in the development of frequency response.
  7. Understand and apply Fourier series in the analysis of circuits.
  8. Decompose input waveform into a sum of mutually orthogonal sinusoidal waveform components.
  9. Develop the limit of the Fourier series as the inverse Fourier transform and apply the direct Fourier transform of a signal in the transformation of time-domain signals to its frequency-domain representation.

EGR 235 : Electronic Theory I

Studies in the theory of semiconductor diodes; bipolar and field effect transistors, including biasing; classes of amplified operation; methods of analysis and design to include Miller's theorem; hybrid parameters; and frequency effects are the focus of this course. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

  1. Design and evaluate the operation of analog & digital circuits that include semiconductor diodes; bipolar and field effect transistors including biasing; classes of amplified operation.
  2. Analyze and design analog & digital circuits using Miller's theorem, hybrid parameters and frequency effects.
  3. Troubleshooting analog & digital circuits.
  4. Model and evaluate analog & digital circuits using Computer Simulation Software.

EGR 241 : Clean Water Technology I

This course introduces students to the physical, chemical, and biological processes associate with water quality, pollution, and the treatment of liquid wastes. Topics covered will include: Basic environmental concerns, hydrology, types of pollution, wastewater flow characteristics, collection systems, wastewater treatment processes, process monitoring and calculations, and sampling procedures. This course includes a laboratory component. The course will also help prepare the student for the lower level Massachusetts State Wastewater Treatment Plant Operator Certification Examination. Three lecture hours, and three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4
    Students who successfully complete the course will:
  1. Describe the movement of water around the planet through the hydrologic cycle.
  2. Describe the movement of water from homes and industries to wastewater treatment systems.
  3. Describe various wastewater treatment technologies.
  4. Perform process control calculations.
  5. Perform various wastewater laboratory analyses.

EGR 242 : Clean Water Technology II

A continuation of Wastewater Technology I (EGR 241) to prepare the student in the design, operation and maintenance of advanced wastewater treatment facilities. Topics covered will include: environmental concerns, chronic and acute toxicity of wastestreams, instrumentation of specialized treatment procedures, biological and chemical observations with"hands-on" treatment observations. The student will also be expected to attend tours of local facilities (domestic/industrial). The program will also prepare the student for the State Operator's Certification Examination - Intermediate Levels. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

  1. Identify the organisms that are cultured in a wastewater treatment plant and what their relative abundances in the wastewater indicate about the condition of the wastewater treatment process.
  2. Conduct total suspended solids testing on various process streams in a wastewater treatment plant.
  3. Calibrate and operate pH meters and dissolved oxygen meters.
  4. Conduct Biochemical Oxygen Demand tests to determine the organic strengths of the wastewater process streams.
  5. Understand the operation and basic maintenance of various pumps including positive displacement pumps, centrifugal pumps, diaphragm pumps and air lift pumps.
  6. Select the proper pump based on pump curve characteristics.
  7. Understand the operation and maintenance of aeration equipment, clarifiers, solids handling and various disinfection equipment.
  8. Apply mathematical formulas for the calculation of chemical dosages, process flows, and concentrations of materials for proper plant process control.
  9. Determine the proper dosages of polymer for sludge conditioning.
  10. Understand the basics of horsepower and electricity and be able to calculate power needs to move water.
  11. Be prepared to take the Grade 3 or 4 Massachusetts Wastewater Operator Certification Examination.

EGR 244 : Basic Drinking Water Treatment

This course prepares students for entry into the field of water supply management and the operation of drinking water treatment facilities. The principles of hydrology associated with groundwater and surface water supply management are studied, including the hydrologic cycle, precipitation type and measurement, aquifer types and groundwater flow measurements, surface water flow measurements, and surface water and well sampling. Students study source water supplies and protection, regulations, physical and chemical treatment processes, and operator safety. This class includes field trips. This class is state approved for preparation for taking the Grade 2 Massachusetts Drinking Water Treatment Plant Operator Certification Examination. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Spring

Credits

4
  1. Understand the basics of the three water infrastructure systems including drinking water, stormwater, and wastewater in the United States.
  2. Understand how water moves through the hydrologic cycle from the oceans, to the atmosphere, to the ground, then over the ground and under the ground, and back to the ocean.
  3. Study trends in precipitation and calculations of precipitation and runoff over a watershed area.
  4. Understand the role of the drinking water operator and their ethical responsibility to the community they serve.
  5. Explain what a public water supply is, and how they are categorized.
  6. Prepare a basic water budget based on evaporation rate, precipitation, inflows and outflows from a water system.
  7. Explain the different processes used to treat water at a conventional drinking water filtration plant.
  8. Apply mathematical formulas for the calculations of flows and concentrations of materials moving through a drinking water filtration plant.
  9. Explain the operation and basic maintenance of various pieces of equipment used at a drinking water filtration plant, such as pumps, clarifiers, flow meters, valves and filters.
  10. Determine dosages and concentrations of chemicals used in the water treatment processes.
  11. Determine flows in natural streams as well as flows within a drinking water plant.
  12. Perform mathematical calculations involving areas, volumes, flows, pressure, horsepower and electricity.
  13. Be prepared to take the Massachusetts Grade 1 and Grade 2 Drinking water Treatment Plant Operator Certification Examinations.

EGR 245 : Hazardous Waste/Waste Management

This course examines the various components of the hazardous waste and solid waste management field. Emphasis will be placed on the examination, evaluation, and cleanup of hazardous waste sites as well as on providing an introduction to solid waste management and disposal. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

  1. Identify and have a basic understanding of the major legislative acts that govern hazardous waste.
  2. Describe the major categories of hazardous wastes and their physical and chemical properties.
  3. Describe the hierarchy of hazardous waste management, including source reduction, recycle and reuse, treatment and disposal.
  4. Understand the Uniform Hazardous Waste Manifest System.
  5. Describe hazardous waste handling, treatment, and disposal processes.

EGR 246 : Collection Systems

This course is designed to introduce the student to the process of collection of wastewater within a community. Students will learn about the components of the collection system, safe working practices, inspection and testing of collections systems, pipeline cleaning and maintenance, underground repair and construction, and the components, operation and inspection of lift stations. This course will also help prepare students for Collection System Certification Examinations. Three lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

3
    Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:
  1. Describe the importance of, and the components of wastewater collection systems.
  2. Opearte wastewater collection systems safely.
  3. Inspect, operate, clean, and maintain collection systems.
  4. Operate, inspect, and maintain the lift stations in the collection systems.
  5. Be prepared to take the Massachusetts Collection System Operator Certification Examinations.

EGR 248 : Advanced Water Treatment

This course is a continuation course following the EGR 244 Basic Water treatment course. It will provide students with a review of basic concepts, knowledge of regulatory requirements, water treatment processes, equipment types and maintenance, laboratory procedures, safety practices, and administrative procedures. The course is designed to prepare students to take the Massachusetts Grades 3 and 4 Drinking Water Treatment Plant Operator Certification Examinations. The course will be presented in a hybrid format with lecture content online and a hands-on face-to-face laboratory component. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

    Upon successfule completion of the course students will:
  1. Be able to explain the treatment practices used at water treatment plants.
  2. Perform laboratory skills to do the basic required analyses of drinikng water water.
  3. Be able to describe the function of the various equipment used in the drinking water treatment processes and how to perform basic maintenance on them.
  4. Be able to explain the regulatory and the administrative duties at a drinking water treatment plant.
  5. Be prepared to take the Massachusetts Grades 3 and 4 Drinking Water Certification Examinations.

EGR 249 : Distribution Systems

This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge necessary to work on distribution systems needed to provide drinking water to a community. Students will learn what a public water systems is, the importance of its proper operation, regulatory requirements, and the ethics required of an operator, the components, equipment and operation of a distribution systems, the monitoring of the water quality in the system, and the administrative duties required. This course will prepare students for taking the Massachusetts Distribution Certification Examinations. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
    Upon successful completion students will be able to:
  1. Define what a public drinikng water system is and why it is importnat to run the system properly.
  2. Describe the different components of a distribution system.
  3. Describe the equipment needed and the operation and maintenance of the equipment.
  4. Perform tests to determine the water quality of the drinking water in the system.
  5. Define the administrative tasks required.

EGR 251 : Statics

This course considers the effects of forces on rigid bodies in two and three dimensions. Students apply engineering concepts of force vectors, moments, and static equilibrium to solve engineering design problems. The course investigates techniques for structural analysis of beams, columns, mechanisms, trusses and shafts. Topics include friction, torsion, centroids, center of gravity, moment of inertia, and shear and moment diagrams. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Define scalars, vectors, vector components and principles of static equilibrium.
  2. Differentiate between body forces, internal forces, external/applied forces, and reactions as supports.
  3. Analyze structures (trusses, beams and others) to find external reactions and internal forces using graphical techniques, summation of forces and moments, the dot product, and the cross product.
  4. Apply the concepts of moments and rotational equilibrium, static and dynamic friction to the analysis of the interaction of rigid bodies.
  5. Use the Method of Sections and Method of Joints to analyze trusses.
  6. Define the properties of a body (Center of Gravity, Centroid and Moment of Inertia) and apply them to the analysis of beams.

EGR 253 : Advanced Statics

This course is to be taken concurrently with EGR 251 and covers advanced rigid body analysis techniques utilizing calculus. Students apply the engineering concepts of force vectors, moments and static equilibrium to solve engineering design problems for common engineering structures. They use these techniques to solve problems associated with friction, torsion, centroids, centers of gravity, moments of inertia, shear and moment diagrams, and Mohr's Circle. Two laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Use calculus-based methodology to the analyze structures (trusses, beams and others) to find external reactions and internal forces using graphical techniques, summation of forces and moments, the dot product, and the cross product.
  2. Apply calculus-based techniques and the concepts of moments and rotational equilibrium, static and dynamic friction to the analysis of the interaction of rigid bodies.
  3. Define the properties of a body (Center of Gravity, Centroid and Moment of Inertia) and apply calculus-based methods and techniques to the analysis of beams.

EGR 254 : Mechanics of Materials and Structures

In this course, the concepts of stress and strain caused by tensile, compression, shear and bending forces and the associated material behavior are studied. Classical and computer methods are used to analyze beams, trusses, and structures. Students also study torsion, column action and the strength of bolted and welded joints. The design of structural members made of wood, steel, and reinforced concrete is introduced. In the laboratory, students perform testing techniques used to analyze the mechanical properties of materials and evaluate structures. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

  1. Define the material properties important to engineering design including strength, modulus of elasticity, poisons, ratios, and thermal characteristic.
  2. Use beam analysis tools (graphical integration and shear and moment diagrams) to determine beam strength and deflection.
  3. Design basic wood, steel, and reinforced concrete structural members to withstand common loading conditions.
  4. Apply the analysis and design techniques associated with power transmission shafts, bolted, riveted, and welded joints and columns.
  5. Use experimental methods to determine material properties and design structures.

EGR 255 : Thermodynamics

An introductory course in the fundamentals of classical thermodynamics covering such topics as: the First Law of Thermodynamics, Heat Engines, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, the Internal Combustion Engine, Gas Turbines, Steam Power Generation, the Rankin Cycle, and Heat Transfer. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

PHY 102 or PHY 212 and MTH 215, or permission of the instructor.
  1. Define thermodynamics concepts including: pressure, temperature, work, heat, energy and how they apply to open (flow) and closed (non-flow) systems.
  2. Define energy conversion, enthalpy and specific heat and apply them using the Energy Equation.
  3. Calculate efficiency and entropy and apply them to reversible and irreversible cycles, specifically The Carnot Cycle.
  4. Illustrate the concepts of phase, phase change (vaporization), quality and enthalpy and use them to determine the properties of steam using computer programs, the Steam tables and Mollier chart.
  5. Analyze Carnot, Rankine and actual power generation cycles and alternative energy sources using graphical and mathematical techniques.
  6. Apply the concepts of Specific heat, gas constants and partial pressure to a variety of processes using ideal gas law, the Gas tables & the Psychometric chart.
  7. Analyze the Otto, diesel and Brayton cycles and the internal combustion engine using graphical and mathematical techniques.
  8. Calculate Coefficient of Performance and use refrigerant tables to analyze refrigeration cycles.

EGR 264 : Oceanographic Technology

This course is an overview of the use of various types of oceanographic instrumentation and equipment for use in scientific experiments and data collection. The course includes the fundamentals of electronic sensors and instrumentation, the use of various data collection and transmission schemes, and the use of computers and wireless communication for scientific experiments. The course also covers special challenges involved in working in the marine environment including specialized equipment and at sea operations. In addition, the course will cover the use of underwater vehicles including AUV's, ROV's, gliders and towbodies. Three lecture hours per week. Fall Not offered every year.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Intermediate Algebra Competency; or concurrent enrollment in MTH 152.

Corequisites

Intermediate Algebra Competency; or concurrent enrollment in MTH 152.
    Upon completion of this course, the student will be:
  1. Familiar with the theories and operation of oceanographic instrumentation currently in use
  2. Familiar with the logistical and other issues involved in oceanographic operations

EGR 268 : Fisheries Technologies and Monitoring Techniques

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the commercial fishing industry in the northwest Atlantic Ocean from the Gulf of Maine to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Students study the various fisheries and gain an understanding of the regulations and management practices that govern them. Student also learn about the various fishing gear and practices used to catch commercial marine fish, crustaceans, and shellfish. The concept of geographic and statistical fishing areas is taught. The collection of samples and data is critical to the management of the industry, and students learn the necessary sampling protocols and the proper completion of various data logs. Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Spring, Summer

Credits

4
  1. Define what a fishery is.
  2. Understand the basic ecology of fishing grounds.
  3. Understand the basic concepts of fishery management.
  4. Identify the fishing gear used in the Northeast ground fish fisheries.
  5. Identify different types of fishing vessels.
  6. Subsample from the total catch and calculate estimates of fish species weights in the total catch.
  7. Identify 70 species of finfish and invertebrates in the US Northeast fisheries.
  8. Identify 30 species of cetaceans sighted in the areas of the US Northeast fisheries.
  9. Identify 5 species of seals sighted in the areas of the US Northeast fisheries.
  10. Identify 5 species of sea turtles sighted in the areas of the US Northeast fisheries.
  11. Identify 15 species of seabirds sighted in the areas of the US Northeast fisheries.
  12. Understand the role of the At-Sea Monitor on a commercial fishing vessel.
  13. Be prepared to take the At-Sea Monitoring training and examinations offered by the National Marine Fisheries Service, Northeast Fisheries Science Center, Fisheries Sampling Branch for certification as an At-Sea Monitor.

EGR 272 : Strength of Materials

A study of the stresses and strains caused by tensile, compression and shearing forces. The course includes stress strain curves and the mechanical properties of engineering materials and investigates shear and bending moment diagrams and stresses due to beam loading. Students also study the strength of bolted and welded joints, torsion and column action. The laboratory includes the study of the general material testing techniques used to analyze the mechanical properties of materials. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

  1. Define material strength, simple stresses (tension, compression, shear, and bearing) and strain and explain how these quantities differ.
  2. Describe how indirect loadings (bending and twisting) cause these simple stresses and to be able to determine the stress magnitudes.
  3. Describe how materials and structure will respond to the applied stresses (simple or indirect).
  4. Define the material properties important to engineering design including strength, modulus of elasticity, poisons, ratios, and thermal characteristics and determine these properties using experimental methods.
  5. Define torque and torsion and how they apply them to different types of beams, shafts and loadings.
  6. Use beam analysis tools (Graphical Integration and shear and moment diagrams) to determine beam strength and/or deflection.
  7. Apply the analysis and design techniques associated with columns, bolted, riveted, and welded joints.

EGR 281 : Offshore Safety and Survival

This course covers safe working practices for the offshore industry and especially for working with offshore wind turbines. Centered around Health, Safety and Environment (HSE) practices and regulations, the course discusses the basic and advanced-level safety issues, examines case studies in rescue and first aid, and identifies skill sets needed for activities such as climbing, blade repair, handling of fire, identification of hazards, and manual handling. The course aims to provide comprehensive coverage of topics needed for industry-prevalent certification. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4
  1. Demonstrate an overall understanding of the need for HSE regulations, emergency safety procedures, and safe working practices in relation to offhsore wind
  2. turbines industry. This includes identifying safety-related challenges in varied work environments.
  3. Develop strategies and practices for working safely with offshore wind turbines and demonstrate this understanding in case studies.
  4. Identify hazards associated with working in offshore wind turbines including but not limited to working at heights, working with high power generating machinery
  5. and heavy rotating equipment, in offshore environment.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of different safety equipment (harness, lanyards, arrestors, etc.) under varied working conditions.
  7. Identify the hazards posed by fire and demonstrate awareness of strategies to deal with the fire originating from different sources.
  8. Demonstrate knowledge and skillsets needed for survival in an offshore location in either a simulated environment of as a written assignment around a case
  9. study.

EGR 282 : Wind Power Technology

This course is designed to provide the operational and electrical skills required for an entry level technical position in global wind industry. It will equip individuals with the knowledge and skills required for siting, assembling and installing of wind energy projects of different scales - from small commercial and municipal turbines to utility scale wind farms located offshore or land-based. Topics Include: Project Operations, Turbine Fundamentals, Cranes & Rigging, Fasteners & Torqueing, Shaft Alignment and Bonding, Grounding and Lightning Protection systems. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

EGR 131 or EGR 151 required. EGR 171 and EGR 172 recommended.

  1. Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to:
  2. Describe the balance of plant (BOP) requirements and expectations pertaining to wind turbine operation and describe the general siting and wind farm development process.
  3. Identify the component, component location and describe the general function and purpose of the turbine components.
  4. Identify and demonstrate the techniques and safe use of equipment associated with Cranes, Hoists, Rigging and Cribbing.
  5. Demonstrate the safe use of various fasteners, torque & tension equipment including the difference between dry and wet torque.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of basic principles, methods and techniques of shaft alignment.
  7. Demonstrate proper Bonding, Grounding and Lightning Protection techniques, theory, and significance of how a wind turbine detracts and dissipates lightning.

EGR 283 : Wind Power Operations and Maintenance

This course is designed to provide the operational and mechanical skills required for an entry level technical position in global wind industry. It will equip individuals with knowledge and skills required for operation and maintenance of wind energy projects of different scales- from small commercial and municipal turbines to utility scale wind farms located offshore or land-based. Topics include: Maintenance Operations, Cooling/Heating systems, PLCs and SCADA, Bearings, Gearboxes and Yaw Systems. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

EGR 171 required. EGR 282 and EGR 131 or EGR 151 recommended.
    Upon Successful completion of this course, students will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate maintenance operations and define equipment requirements for wind power systems including reporting, inspection, monitoring and protection methods.
  2. Demonstrate inspection, maintenance and operation of Cooling and Heating systems used in the wind power industry.
  3. Demonstrate the basic functions of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) & Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Systems used in the wind power industry.
  4. Analyze bearing specifications and demonstrate the associated installation, maintenance, inspection and replacement systems and processes.
  5. Recognize and define gearbox types, functions and general operations including lubrication, maintenance and inspection.
  6. Recognize and define Yaw control system components, function and maintenance requirements.

EGR 284 : Solar Power

This course provides an in-depth introduction to solar energy as a sustainable form of power and how it can be utilized for a variety of energy demand applications in residential, commercial, and municipal buildings. The benefits and limitations of various common solar energy technologies used to produce heat, hot water, and electricity are examined. The course looks at the process of siting, sizing and designing of solar hot water and solar photovoltaic electric systems and how to perform an economic and environmental analysis of proposed systems. In the classroom, students gain a basic understanding of the fundamental science of heat and energy and an up-to-date knowledge of the equipment and techniques used in the solar industry. While in the laboratory, students develop the hands-on skills necessary to evaluate, install and maintain solar power systems. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

EGR 131 or EGR 151 or permission of instructor.
  1. Describe and quantify the solar resource and explain what factors influence the availability of solar energy at different locations across the globe.
  2. Differentiate between the main categories of solar energy technologies (passive thermal, solar hot water, photovoltaic, and concentrating solar power) and explain which technologies work best for different applications.
  3. Conduct a site assessment to determine amount of solar irradiation at a particular location and the properly site and orient a building to optimize solar gain.
  4. Identify and explain the type, benefits, limitations, markets and applications of different types of solar thermal and photovoltaic systems.
  5. Describe the thermodynamics principals at work in active solar thermal systems.
  6. Identify various types of photovoltaic cells and explain how they convert sunlight into electricity.
  7. Calculate demand and properly size a solar thermal system and a photovoltaic systems (both stand alone and grid connected) to meet loads of the applications.
  8. Calculate the energy output, fuel savings, and emission reductions and explain the associated economics of solar thermal and photovoltaic systems.

EGR 285 : Power Transmission in Offshore Environment

This course identifies key components of infrastructure needed to transport offshore-generate power to onshore locations. These components include offshore cables (HVDC and HVAC), offshore substations, electrical transformers, and power controlling and protection devices. The course also examines monitoring practices and maintenance needs associated with each of these components and identifies some of their common failures and related corrective/preventative maintenance strategies. The economics of offshore power generation and transportation are briefly discussed. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. , Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

  1. Demonstrate common monitoring and maintenance needs and challenges related to offshore power infrastructure.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of types of failures and faults in offshore electrical power transportation infrastructure.
  3. Identify the need and design of over-voltage and over-current protection mechanism used in electrical networks using power relays.
  4. Recognize common issues linked with integration of offshore wind turbines power with the national grid, and the impact of offshore electrical power infrastructure failure.
  5. Demonstrate the use of power tools and instruments as a mean to identify failure in electrical infrastructure.
  6. Analyze relevant power curves and demonstrate its use in a case study.

EGR 286 : Data and Command Center Management

Credits

4
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the need and importance of data and command center for the offshore wind farms.
  2. Demonstrate an ability to categorize, manipulate and analyze large volumes of data using concepts of mathematics.
  3. Ability to identify failures in components by studying abnormalities in condition monitoring data and maintenance reports.
  4. Shows an understanding of the regional and global rules and regulations around data privacy and data security.
  5. Demonstrates the ability to use tools and software to manage large volumes of data such as SQL, Oracle.

EGR 287 : Corrosion Management and Control

This course examines fundamental principles behind corrosion of structures and discusses best practices in corrosion control and its management. Strengths and weaknesses of various corrosion management strategies are examined, and discussion is included of industry standards such as those of the National Association of Corrosion Management Engineers (NACE), Det Norske Veritas (DNV), and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). Three lecture hours per week. , Spring

Credits

3
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of corrosion as a surface, and beneath a surface, chemical phenomenon.
  2. Identify the impact of corrosion and different types of failures introduced in metals and non-metals. Design preventative and corrective corrosion control measures.
  3. Apply knowledge of corrosion control in planning maintenance strategies
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of principles behind inspection and monitoring methods used in corrosion control.
  5. Demonstrate an ability to design a maintenance strategy to control corrosion and perform its financial analysis.

EGR 299 : Engineering Projects

This capstone course allows students to use the engineering and technical skills they have developed to solve an actual engineering team design project. Students work onsite with a mentor participating in all aspects of the design process, from initial identification of the design problem through the implementation and management of the design solution. Students use a variety of design, project management, research, manufacturing tools, test and evaluation in the completion of their project. Design projects cross disciplines and cover a variety of engineering, design, and technical subject areas. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Applies. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

30+ credits completed in major or prior approval by the instructor.
  1. Utilize engineering tools and methods to solve complex, real world design problems using a site based learning approach.
  2. Work in an organized environment with specific educational goals.
  3. Solve complex problems which require integrating many aspects of engineering.