Culinary Arts

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

CUL 100 : Introduction to College/Culinary Experience

This course facilitates the new Culinary Arts students’ transition to college and the Culinary Arts Program. Students will be introduced to the college’s resources and familiarize themselves with the expectations, skills and information necessary to succeed in the Culinary Arts Program. As part of this course, students will begin their Professional Career Portfolio that will document their education. Applies. One lecture hour per week. Fall

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Open to Culinary Arts Students Only.
  1. Identify their learning style and develop a personal approach to their learning that establishes a clear pathway to success in a culinary arts career.
  2. Utilize time management skills in balancing academic, personally, and career activities.
  3. Demonstrate a basic level knowledge in the culinary arts such as kitchen equipment, kitchen management, measurement calculation, professionalism (attitude
  4. and appearance), teamwork, and basic cooking methods for both the hot kitchen and the bakeshop.
  5. Begin to work in a professional career portfolio that will demonstrate the student's achievements throughout the course of the program.

CUL 102 : Culinary Art

This course develops skills that allow culinary and baking and pastry arts students to present food in an artistically pleasing manner utilizing art skills which includes the creation of three dimensional plates and platters utilizing the principles of form, function, and color. Three lecture hours per week for five weeks. Fall

Credits

1
  1. Understanding of design/art principles.
  2. Observational drawing skills.
  3. Proficiency with varied media.
  4. Aptitude to actively use the imagination.

CUL 103 : Culinary Photography

This course develops skills that allow culinary and baking and pastry arts students to present food in an artistically pleasing manner and digitally record it by the use of a digital camera and correct them for improved professional appearance by means of image editing software. Three lecture hours per week for five weeks. Fall

Credits

1
  1. Understanding of design/art principles.
  2. Observational drawing skills.
  3. Proficiency with varied media.
  4. Aptitude to actively use the imagination.

CUL 104 : Culinary Ice Carving

This course develops skills that allow culinary and baking and pastry students to present food in an artistically pleasing manner and enhance the food service area by introducing them to the basic skills needed to prepare centerpieces and socles to enhance the appearance of food presentation. Two lecture hours and eight lab hours for two weeks. Fall

Credits

1
  1. The student will be able to describe the use of ice as a decoration and its place in the culinary world.
  2. The student will demonstrate the use of ice carving tools and operate them safely.
  3. The student will demonstrate the ability to prepare a usable template.
  4. The student will demonstrate the ability to display both single and multi-block ice sculptures.

CUL 111 : Essentials of Culinary Arts I

This course covers the procedures and techniques of cooking. It develops basic skills including applicable kitchen safety and sanitation. It continues the introduction of and practical use of commercial kitchen equipment and hand tools as well as essential cooking principles. The course includes stocks, sauces and soups; vegetables and starch products; and cold pantry and breakfast preparation. This course requires participation in evening functions. Students continue to develop their culinary portfolios in this course. Two lecture hours and eight laboratory hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

ServSafe certified or concurrent enrollment in CUL 140. A grade of C- or better or concurrent enrollment in CUL 100.
  1. Understand their role as a professional food service worker.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to work in a full service kitchen, utilizing proper culinary techniques.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to prepare and serve the food products for the required Culinary Arts functions.

CUL 112 : Essentials of Culinary Arts II

This course is a continuation of CUL 111 and builds on the essentials developed in CUL 111. The course is a practicum in the application of the procedures and techniques of cooking. This course includes meats, poultry and fish. The course focuses on the individual and group preparation and presentation of meals and their components as well as on the skills to assess and critique them. It culminates in a final practical assessment. The course requires participation in evening functions and continuation of the student's personal portfolio. Two class hours and eight laboratory hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CUL 111 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of the program director, and valid ServSafe certification.
  1. Demonstrate the ability to fabricate and utilize a variety of proteins used in a full service kitchen.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to mise en place, prepare and present the assigned menu items.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work in a professional manner with all the class members, both individually and as a team to achieve a common goal.
  4. Pass the Final PRACTICAL exam.

CUL 113 : Baking Skills for Cooks

This course focuses on the baking skills cooks or chefs working in smaller establishments should possess, including breads and rolls, quick breads, pies, cookies and simple pastries, and basic cake decorating and seasonal items. One class hour and four lab hours per week. Fall, Spring; Day only.

Credits

2

Prerequisites

Passing scores on the College Writing, Reading, and Arithmetic placement tests, or concurrent enrollment in or prior completion of ENG 090, ENG 091, ENG 092 or MTH 011, or RDG 080 or RDG 090, as applicable; ServSafe certified or concurrent enrollment in CUL 140.

  1. Demonstrate the ability to perform a variety of basic baking procedures in a commercial bakeshop/kitchen, including breads, pastries and cakes.
  2. Demonstrate the creativity and skill necessary to prepare, bake and decorate a seasonal holiday display item.

CUL 121 : Dining Room Functions I

This course introduces students to the proper dining room procedures and the relationship of the dining room to the kitchen. It covers a variety of service styles including American, Buffet, Banquet and Family Style. The course also covers beverage service relative to these types of service. The course requires participation in evening functions. Two lecture hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

2
  1. Demonstrate the ability to work in a professional dining room in a variety of foodservice settings including; a la carte, buffet, banquet, American and family services.
  2. Demonstrate the ability, through role play and functions, to interact with all guests, including those requiring additional services and/or dietary restrictions.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work the various stations assigned at the required Culinary Arts functions.
  4. Demonstrate familiarity with the tools, service ware and equipment utilized in basic dining room service including their location, use and proper maintenance.

CUL 122 : Dining Room Functions II

This course focuses solely on the practical aspect of operating an a la carte dining room. Students develop their front-of-the-house skills by greeting customers, taking and delivering orders, and collecting cash. This course requires evening function participation. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

2

Prerequisites

CUL 121 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of the program director, and valid ServSafe certification.
  1. Function at the various dining room stations.
  2. Demonstrate table settings, meal and beverage service.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to work professionally as an individual and as a team in the Grady Dining Room.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to interact with all kitchen personnel and develop an understanding of the relationship between the front and the back of the house.

CUL 123 : Mixology and Bar Management

A major focus of this course includes:"Training for Intervention Procedures by Servers of Alcohol" (TIPS), centered around a nationally recognized course, culminating in a standardized exam and certificate. Also covered are proper procedures for a bar setup, the art of drink preparation and service, and an introduction to the history, service and storage of wine. Two lecture hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

2
  1. Demonstrate all aspects of bar service and management.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to work individually and as a team in the Grady Dining Room bar and at College functions.
  3. Pass both the TIPS exam (Training for Intervention Procedures for Servers of Alcohol) and the practical Drinks exam portions of the class.

CUL 140 : Sanitation for Culinarians

This course focuses on the safe and sanitary operation of a restaurant and pastry shop and, using the Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point System (HACCP), focuses on the safe and sanitary purchasing, receiving, storing, cooling, and reheating of meats, produce, seafood, and baking ingredients (flours, fruits, dairy products, thickeners) to prevent food borne illness. The course centers on a nationally certified course sponsored by the National Restaurant Association and culminates in a standardized exam and the awarding of the ServSafe certificate. It also meets one of the mandatory requirements for certification in the American Culinary Federation (ACF). Two lecture hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

2
  1. Develop an awareness of food-borne illnesses, what causes them, and how they can be prevented.
  2. Assess the need for a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point food safety system in a foodservice establishment and implement that system.
  3. Develop an awareness of and be able to discuss sanitation in purchasing and receiving practices as they apply to the food service industry.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to properly issue, prepare, hold, serve, cool, and store food and leftovers and re-heat food for service to insure proper sanitation and prevention of food-borne illness.

CUL 151 : Essentials of Baking I

This course teaches the principles of professional baking, including sanitation, safety regulations, and personal hygiene. It also expands on the use and care of the bakeshop utensils and equipment and the knife skills used in baking and pastry production. The course begins to examine the chemistry of baking through the preparation of quick breads, yeast dough, and Artisan breads. The course emphasizes yeast fermentation, ingredient functions, flavors, and bread baking. The course requires two seasonal projects and participation in the evening Culinary Arts functions. Students continue to develop their personal portfolios in this class. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours per week. Fall/Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ServSafe certified or concurrent enrollment in CUL 140. Grade of C- or better in CUL 100 or concurrent enrollment.
  1. Utilize the twelve steps of bread baking to demonstrate an understanding of the yeast bread baking process.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to mix, shape and bake a basic variety of lean, rich and laminated yeast dough products for foodservice outlets and decorative displays.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to produce Artisan breads utilizing pre-ferments and starters.
  4. Design, prepare, bake and decorate seasonal decorative items for display.

CUL 152 : Essentials of Baking II

This course is a continuation of CUL 151 and focuses on laminated dough and pâté a choux as an introduction to classical pastries. The course introduces the preparation and use of custards, creme anglaise, and dessert sauces, and emphasizes the mixing methods, shaping, and portioning, filling, baking and finishing of cookies, petit fours, pies, and cakes. The course further emphasizes slicing, filling, and decorating layer cakes with a variety of decorating techniques, including icings and piping. This course requires participation in evening functions and continuation of the student's personal portfolio. It culminates in a final practical assessment which the student must pass with a "Pass" grade. Two classroom hours and eight laboratory hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CUL 151 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the program director, and valid ServSafe Certification.
  1. Demonstrate the ability to prepare a variety of puff pastry products using laminated dough.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to prepare and produce pie and sweet dough for the production of pies and pastries.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to prepare a variety of cooked and baked desserts such as custards, cheesecakes, puddings and souffles.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to mix, bake and decorate a variety of cakes using different methods and techniques.
  5. Pass the Final PRACTICAL exam.

CUL 153 : Baking Technologies

This course focuses on and examines the principles and functions of ingredients (flours, fats, sweeteners, dairy) used in baking and pastry production. It explores the variables of bakery ingredients and the physical behavior of the product from ingredients through formulation and production. The course uses oral and written reports to emphasize the analysis of the final products. Two classroom hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ServSafe Certified or concurrent enrollment in CUL 140, and a grade of C- or better or concurrent enrollment in CUL 100.
  1. Identify ingredients used in baking and pastry products.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the functions of ingredients and the changes that occur during processing and production of bakery products.
  3. Evaluate the production techniques and formulas of the pastry products and explain and demonstrate how to improve the products if necessary.
  4. Adjust ingredients, change production methods and create new recipes to meet consumer tastes.

CUL 154 : Introduction to Showpieces and Displays

This course explores the design and techniques of contrasting amenities, showpieces, and displays of various sizes, shapes, and themes, using a variety of media. Students plan, execute, and maintain the Culinary Arts public display area. Students continue to develop their personal portfolio. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CUL 151 and CUL 153 with grades of C- or better or permission of program director, and valid ServSafe Certification.
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of function themes in order to enhance and display food and decorative work.
  2. Design and execute seasonal, celebratory and holiday themed decor as it relates to themed functions.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to arrange plates for a la carte, platters, buffets and centerpieces, utilizing the principles of form and color.
  4. Manage the ongoing display area.

CUL 155 : Cooking Skills for the Baker

This course focuses on the cooking skills for bakers or pastry chefs working in smaller establishments. The learning skills include meat fabrication, preparation cooking and utilization of protein, stock, vegetable, and starch items. One lecture hour and four laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

2

Prerequisites

ServSafe Certification or concurrent enrollment in CUL 140.
  1. Demonstrate the ability to perform a variety of basic cooking methods in a commercial kitchen, including meat fabrication, preparation cooking, utilization and
  2. storage of a variety of protein, stock, vegetable and starch items.
  3. Demonstrate an understanding of doneness and seasoning and the skill necessary to prepare a generated meal using a protein, starch, vegetable and sauce.

CUL 160 : Introduction to Hospitality Food Services

This course will provide an introduction for the hospitality student to the basic culinary roles found in commercial food production. Through lecture/demonstration, the student will gain a practical knowledge applicable to professional kitchens as well as hand tools and large equipment in order to develop the confidence necessary to interact with and supervise food service professionals. Additionally, all aspects of menu production utilized in full service kitchens will be covered. Students will also be instructed in CPR (Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation) and must pass the practical exam and receive their certificate to pass the course. Culinary Function participation is required. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Proper Uniform required for all sessions. Instructional support fee applies. Fall, Spring.

Credits

3
  1. Name and demonstrate the use of all of the small hand tools used in the commercial kitchen.
  2. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the refrigeration and cooking equipment in the commercial kitchen.
  3. Demonstrate a knowledge of all of the various food production methods demonstrated by the chef/instructor.
  4. Dress in a professional manner.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to discuss foods and menu productiuon using the correct terminology.

CUL 165 : Culinary Arts or Baking Arts Certificate Seminar

This course is the capstone course for the Certificate of Achievement in Culinary Arts or Baking and Pastry Arts. Students will develop a Professional Portfolio that will record their progress through writing assignments and portfolio requirements. One lecture hour and one online laboratory hour per week. Spring

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Culinary Arts Majors: Valid ServSafe Certificate and CUL 121 and CUL 140. Baking and Pastry Arts Majors: Valid ServSafe Certificate and CUL 140.

Corequisites

Culinary Arts Majors: CUL 112, CUL 113, and CUL 240. Baking and Pastry Arts Majors: CUL 152, CUL 154 and CUL 240.
  1. Establish a clear education plan for their culinary arts education and career which demonstrates a pathway from their first semester to their first
  2. professional culinary arts position through kitchen and academic organization.
  3. Create a professional portfolio that records their progress for an entry level foodservice position.

CUL 211 : Advanced Culinary Techniques I

This course encompasses a wide variety of high-level practical preparation skills in the areas of Garde Manger, Classical French Cuisine, and Cuisine of the Americas. The section on Garde Manger builds on the basic essential skills and applies them at an advanced level to the art of presenting food in a decorative manner. The course also includes various components of the garde manger's skills, including cheese and sausage making, appetizers and canapé© preparation, decorative vegetable carving and food smoking, pâté, galantines, and cold food presentation. The class lessons in the Classical French Cuisine segment reflect the very foundations of formal cuisine, studying and preparing the recipes of Escoffier, Carame, and other early masters. The Cuisine of the Americas' section covers the cooking of North and South America, focusing on the important culinary regions in each area. Three class hours and twelve lab hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

6

Prerequisites

CUL 112 with a grade of C- or better, a "Pass" grade in the Practical Exam and satisfactory progress in the student's personal portfolio, or permission of the program director.
    A. Regional American Cuisine:
  1. Demonstrate an academic knowledge of the various regions and the uses of a variety of ingredients (indigenous and assimilated and commonly used raw and prepared) in this country and the states which make up those regions.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to prepare and present American regional dishes.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to exchange the regional ingredients with similar ingredients from other regions without changing the integrity of the dish.
  4. Demonstrate an academic knowledge of the terms, phrases and cooking procedures to replicate the dishes from the regions.
  5. Demonstrate an academic knowledge of the evolution of the recipes and dishes in the various regions from their roots to modern day applications.
  6. B. Garde Manger:
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of and the ability to plan and execute basic principles of buffet presentation.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to prepare a variety of forcemeats and use them to prepare sausages, pates, terrines, galantines and roulades.
  9. Demonstrate the ability to use proper methods for brining, curing and smoking meats and fish.
  10. Demonstrate the ability to prepare a variety of salads, cold sauces, condiments and pickles appropriate for buffet service.
  11. Demonstrate the preparation of a variety of appetizers and hors d’oeuvres.
  12. C. Classical French Cuisine:
  13. Demonstrate an academic knowledge of the various individuals involved in Classical Cuisine such as Caesar Ritz and Auguste Escoffier and the evolution of Classical Cuisine from earlier cuisine into modern cuisine.
  14. Demonstrate knowledge of the ingredients, applicable cooking methods and procedures and meal service of classical cuisine.
  15. Demonstrate the ability to convert classical recipes into modern recipes using modern procedures and ingredients.

CUL 212 : Advanced Culinary Techniques II

This course applies the skills acquired in CUL 111 and CUL 112. The course applies a variety of International Cuisines studied through classroom lecture and practical work in the kitchen. In addition to the classroom participation in the evaluation of the products prepared, students also prepare food for sale in the Grady Dining Room for lunch one day a week. The course covers Asia, the Mediterranean/Europe, and the African continent. It requires participation in evening functions and continued development of the student's culinary portfolio. Three class hours and twelve lab hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

6

Prerequisites

CUL 211 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the program director.
  1. Demonstrate an academic knowledge of the history, geography, food ingredients and general characteristics of the International cuisines covered in this course.
  2. Prepare and present a variety of dishes from these regions.
  3. Create and execute an International Menu.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to mise en place and execute the various stations necessary to operate an a la carte kitchen.

CUL 216 : The Capstone Experience for Culinarians

This course is the capstone course for Culinary Arts majors and culminates in the presentation of the Senior Recognition Dinner. Students develop a menu, determine the nutritional analysis for the menu, and plan and execute the plate presentations and beverage services. Students complete their Culinary Arts Personal Portfolio by the conclusion of this course. Successful completion of the practical exam, with a grade of "Pass" is required. In conclusion of this course, Culinary students will have accumulated a minimum of 175-225 practicum hours. Three class hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CUL 212 with a grade of C- or better or concurrent enrollment; or permission of the program director.
  1. Research and create a gourmet, banquet menu consisting of a Cocktail Reception with both passed hors d'oeuvres and stationary service areas accompanied with appropriate wines and a served, multi-course meal consisting of a soup, small course (meat, fish, poultry), pasta, and entree with accompanying vegetable, starch and salad.
  2. Establish the method of service appropriate for the menu.
  3. Experiment with and determine a variety of acceptable plate designs for each of the courses.
  4. Create and photograph an acceptable tray/ plate setup for each item.
  5. Determine the nutritional values and adjust the recipes to fall within acceptable nutritional guidelines.
  6. Establish the cost for each item on a 10-person recipe and individual portion basis utilizing acceptable commodity ordering sheets.
  7. Complete the PERSONAL PORTFOLIO.
  8. Pass the final PRACTICAL Mystery Basket Exam.

CUL 221 : Advanced Table-side Service

This course introduces the student to a variety of international table services focusing on table-side dinner menu preparations. This course culminates in a required public evening function featuring an advanced service style. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CUL 121 with a grade of C- or better, or permission of the program coordinator, and valid ServSafe Certification.
  1. Demonstrate the ability to work professionally as an individual, and as a team, at the College’s various functions and in the Grady Culinary Arts Dining Room.
  2. Demonstrate and explain the mise en place of various preparation methods and procedures for presentation of appetizers, salads, entrees, drinks and desserts
  3. as they pertain to Tableside Cookery.
  4. Demonstrate International Service and wine service techniques as they pertain to Tableside Service.
  5. Demonstrate, from set-up to break down, a dining room table for multicourse and formal dining presentations as it pertains to Tableside Service.

CUL 240 : Purchasing for Culinarians

This course focuses on proper purchasing techniques and how to correctly identify, purchase, receive, evaluate and store a variety of perishable and non-perishable products. It introduces students to a variety of foods in various market forms, whose use is further expanded in the Culinary/Baking production labs. Principles of cost control, yield testing, and forecasting are discussed and demonstrated. Two class hours per week. Spring; Day only.

Credits

2
  1. Apply generally accepted principles and procedures of selection and procurement in the hospitality industry.
  2. Analyze specific product characteristics, especially their market distribution, quality standards and seasonal availability.
  3. Prepare product specifications.

CUL 241 : Foodservice Operations and Career Development

In this course students design a complete food-service or bakery operation. This introduces the student to the information necessary to start and run a successful restaurant and/or bakery. Students develop a concept, business plan, conduct a market analysis, plan a menu, recipe costing, write purchase specifications, and design a facility that can adequately meet the project standards. Students create a yearly income balance statement that includes calculated food cost percentages, labor, and over-head expenses. Final project consists of written job descriptions, job specifications, as well as framework for the orientation and training program for their employees. Resume writing and interview principles are reviewed. Two class hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

2

Prerequisites

CUL 216 CUL 256 and MTH 115 or MTH 119 or MTH 125 or permission of the program director.

Corequisites

CUL 216 or 256 or permission of the program director.

1. Develop a concept for a foodservice operation and use the parts of the concept to develop a business plan.
2. Plan and cost out a menu for a foodservice operation: design an appropriate kitchen layout to produce that menu, create a description for        each job required for that kitchen, and outline a training program to train individuals for that job.
3. Identify the steps necessary to open a restaurant.
4. Explain the fiscal and legal roadblocks to owning a restaurant.

CUL 251 : Advanced Pastry Arts I

This course studies the history and background of Classical cakes and tortes from various American and international regions. Students learn to deviate from the classics and create unique desserts, sauces, and garnishes with a variety of flavors, textures, and ingredients. The course emphasizes the plating of desserts created in class. It also covers frozen cakes, ice cream, and sorbet desserts. The course emphasizes scaling for individual and volume production and a la carte and dessert buffet presentation. Two class hours and eight lab hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CUL 152 with a grade of C- or better and satisfactory progress in personal portfolio or permission of the program director.
  1. Demonstrate an academic understanding of classical and international desserts and their origin.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to prepare a variety of classical and neoclassical desserts.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to prepare a variety of dessert sauces, garnishes and accompaniments to execute a multi-elemental plated dessert presentation.
  4. Create, prepare and present an international dessert menu to correspond with the regions researched.

CUL 252 : Advanced Pastry Arts II

This course focuses on decorative work and display pieces. It requires projects in chocolate and pastillage and focuses on the use of pastillage, sugar, and chocolate in showpieces. It also explores candy making and poured, pulled, and blown sugar. Three class hours and twelve lab hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

6

Prerequisites

CUL 251 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the program director.
  1. Demonstrate an academic knowledge of the history of chocolate, chocolate tempering, and a variety of uses for chocolate.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to make confections using tempered chocolate, sugar and a variety of fillings.
  3. Demonstrate an academic knowledge of sugar and its uses for decorative purposes.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to design a variety of sugar media pieces for decorative purposes.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to create a sugar showpiece using an array of techniques and procedures with cooking, blowing and pouring sugar, airbrushing and other decorating media.
  6. Create, produce, design and plate international desserts and breads for the CUL 212 International menu.
  7. Produce bakery and pastry products simultaneously with CUL 256 for the Senior Recognition Dinner.

CUL 253 : The Art of the Cake

This course focuses on the history of decorated cakes such as tiered wedding cakes and theme cakes. Students learn a variety of decorating and finishing techniques using media such as rolled fondant and gum paste. The course also covers the pricing, selling, decorating, and displaying of these cakes. It requires the preparation of a multi-tiered wedding cake and a theme cake. Two lecture hours and three lab hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CUL 152 or permission of the program director.
  1. Demonstrate the ability to design, create, build and decorate a three-tiered wedding cake.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to make a variety of flowers using gum paste and pastillage.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to cover a mini-tiered cake and traditional tiered wedding decorating with coverings such as buttercream, royal icing, fondant and marzipan.
  4. Demonstrate the capability to create a decorative piece using pastillage as a decorating medium.

CUL 256 : The Capstone Experience for Bakers

This course is the capstone course for Culinary Arts majors and culminates in the presentation of the Senior Recognition Dinner. Students develop a menu, determine the nutritional analysis for the menu, and plan and execute the plate presentations and beverage services. Students complete their Culinary Arts Personal Portfolio by the conclusion of this course. In conclusion of this course, Baking and Pastry students will have accumulated a minimum of 125-150 practicum hours. Students must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in all courses required for graduation or permission of the program coordinator. Three class hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CUL 251 with a grade of C- or better or permission of the program director.
  1. Research and create a gourmet dessert buffet menu consisting of: Chocolates and candy confections, three breads that differ in flavor, texture and presentation, a sorbet to complement and enhance the dinner menu, a selection of petit fours or mini pastries, and a selection of cakes and entremets that complement the dinner and dessert menu.
  2. Plan and design the presentations used in a full buffet menu and a final menu presentation.
  3. Create and photograph an acceptable tray/plate setup for desserts and showpieces.
  4. Present and serve a dessert buffet with individual desserts and cut pastries appropriate to the event.
  5. Establish the method of service appropriate for the menu.
  6. Decorate and present showpieces or table amenities using one or more of the following media: Sugar/Chocolate/Pastillage/Ice/Gumpaste.
  7. Determine the nutritional value of each portion of dessert.
  8. Establish the cost for each item on a 10-person recipe and individual portion basis, utilizing acceptable commodity ordering sheets.
  9. Pass the final PRACTICAL exam.