Art

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

ART 101 : Visual Art Colloquium

This course will consist of career seminars, visiting artist talks, and workshops to help students explore career possibilities in art and design. This course will provide an overview of art and design careers, including fine arts, textile design, fashion design, industrial design, graphic design, web and multimedia design. Students will gain skills in analyzing works of art and design in addition to exploring career options. They will be introduced to concepts central to design and art pedagogy, including the structure and sequencing for art and design education, the creative process, the design process and oral and written critiques. Two class hours a week, or a total of 32 hours during the semester. Competencies met: Critical Thinking, First Year Experience (9.0) Fall

Credits

1

ART 105 : Survey of Art History I: Ancient through Renaissance Art

This course examines art and architecture from its earliest origins through the Renaissance. The course explores the relationship between art and its social, political, cultural, and economic contexts. The development of world civilization is chronicled in a fashion that emphasizes the interconnectedness between different world cultures. Students think and write critically on how art both reflected and influenced political, social, religious, and economic states of affair. Through lectures, readings, slides, web resources, and films, students learn about the history and art of the Prehistoric periods, the Ancient world, the Medieval period and the Renaissance. Students also learn how visual art traditions help define our understanding of world culture. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Global Awareness (5.2), Social Phenomenon (5.4), Humanities (6.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
  1. Demonstrate introductory knowledge of the periods of art from the beginnings of artistic expression through the Renaissance Period.
  2. Students will be able to identify specific artists and works and place them within their historical context.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the principles and elements of design as they relate to art historical works.
  4. Read with comprehension and critically interpret and evaluate written work within an art historical context.

ART 106 : Survey of Art History II: Modern Art

This course examines art and architecture from the beginning of the Modern era through the present. This course builds upon the foundation students acquire in ART 105. Students continue to explore the relationship between art and its social, political, cultural, and economic contexts. The development of the modern world is discussed in a way that emphasizes the interconnectedness between different world cultures. Students think and write critically on how art both reflected and influenced political, social, religious, and economic states of affair. Through lectures, readings, slides, web resources, and films, students learn about the history of Modern art from the Neoclassical period to the present. Students also learn how visual art traditions help define our understanding of contemporary culture. Competency met: Global Awareness (5.2), Social Phenomenon (5.4), Humanities (6.0) Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 105 is recommended.
  1. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of the periods of art from the beginnings of the Modern period to the present.
  2. Students will be able to identify specific artists and works and place them within their historical context.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the principles and elements of design as they relate to art historical works.
  4. Read with comprehension and critically interpret and evaluate written work within an art historical context.

ART 111 : Drawing I

Through studio experiences, students will learn the basic elements of drawing, including observational skills and building eye/hand coordination. This course will also introduce the psychological and emotional elements of drawing. Individual and inventive expression is encouraged. A variety of media such as pencil, charcoal, pastel, and brush and gouache will be explored. Two hours critique and four hours studio a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall

Credits

3
  1. Demonstrate the basic principles of observational drawing, including drawing mechanics, line, value, perspective and composition.
  2. Create a portfolio of observational drawings.
  3. Critically analyze drawings.

ART 112 : Drawing II

This course is a continuation of ART 111. This course emphasizes observing and drawing the human form. A live model is studied to express gesture, structure, and movement in space, with objective accuracy and increased ability to visualize a concept as important goals. The techniques and media explored in ART 111 are applied to the figure, including pencil, charcoal, conte, ink, wash, and pastels. Two hours critique and four hours studio a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 111 with a grade of C- or higher or permission of the instructor.
  1. Demonstrate increased proficiency in observational drawing skills introduced in Drawing I; specifically line, value, perspective and composition.
  2. Draw the figure from life.
  3. Demonstrate an introductory knowledge of figure drawing that focuses on gesture, proportion, and Gross Anatomy.
  4. Create a portfolio that expands on the skills introduced in Drawing I.
  5. Critically analyze figure drawings.

ART 121 : Two-Dimensional Design

This is a design course introducing the fundamental principles of organizing visual elements on a two-dimensional surface. Problems explore the dynamics of line, form and color on the spatial life of the picture plane. Students work in black and white and color. Materials include ink, gouache and cut paper. Three hours critique/lecture and three hours studio a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall

Credits

3

ART 122 : Two-Dimensional Design II

This design course is a continuation of the problems involved in Two Dimensional Design I (see ART 121). This half will follow the introduction line, form, and color principles on the Two Dimensional surface. Materials will include: gouache, ink papers, and boards. Three hours critique/lecture time and three hours studio a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Spring

Credits

3

ART 131 : Three-Dimensional Design

This course investigates the construction of three dimensional forms using a wide variety of materials including cardboard, clay, plaster, wood and found objects. Emphasis is on the translation of an idea into tangible form. Inventive and personal solutions to problems are encouraged. Three hours critique and three hours studio a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall

Credits

3

ART 132 : Three-Dimensional Design II

The purpose of this course is to investigate various processes of achieving three dimensional form making. Materials and methods will include a selection of clay modeling, wood and/or stone carving, moldmaking, geometrics, linear forms, plastics, and soft forms. Three hours critique and three studio hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Spring

Credits

3

ART 140 : Art Exploration

This course, developed for non-art majors, allows students to explore the basic elements of drawing, painting and design, through a series of studio projects. Class projects include a study of line, value, texture, composition, perspective, and color, through which hand skills, eye coordination, and new visual perceptions help students develop their own unique expressive skills. Media used in the course include pencil, charcoal, brush and ink, and water-based paints. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

ART 151 : Digital Photography

Students in this course learn the fundamentals of the art and craft of making digital images. This hands-on course allows students to explore the basics of photography, including composition and lighting, while developing skills in pixel-based photographic design and processing. It introduces students to the use of the digital camera, scanner, and Adobe Photoshop to create and manipulate images. Students learn how to evaluate images for effectiveness in terms of aesthetics and communication goals: i.e., what makes a good photo? The course also aids students in understanding the role digital photography can play in areas such as illustration, documentation, graphic design, web design, and fine arts. One lecture hour and one laboratory hour per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0), Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

1

ART 201 : Careers in the Visual Arts

This course consists of career seminars, visiting artist talks and critiques, field trips, professional artist demonstrations and workshops to help students further explore career choices in art and design. Activities include research, critical thinking, oral and written presentations, and evaluations. Workshops and demonstrations assist students in developing digital portfolios for transfer applications or for job applications, including selection of work, sequencing, and format. In addition, students participate in a field experience or service learning project. Four class hours a week or a total of sixty-four hours during the semester. Fall

Credits

2

ART 205 : Topics in Contemporary Art

This seminar-style course presents an in-depth examination of contemporary art. The course is designed to strengthen writing skills of the art major while exploring relevant themes such as: formalism, iconography, identity, gender, the body, traditional craft, and new media. Students are introduced to critical theory and methods of interpretation through an examination of contemporary art within the broader context of political, social, intellectual, and cultural issues. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Read with comprehension and critically interpret and evaluate written work within an art historical context.
  2. Demonstrate rhetorically effective, art historical writing.
  3. Demonstrate, at an advanced level of competence, control of art historical language, modes of development and formal conventions.
  4. Demonstrate intermediate information literacy skills by selecting, evaluating, integrating and documenting information gathered from multiple sources into art historical writing.
  5. Understand their place and role in the contemporary art world, through writing and presentation assignments that require an original viewpoint.

ART 211 : Drawing III

Through further studies of the human form, students explore form, structure, mass, and proportion. The figure in relation to its immediate environment is emphasized. In addition, students explore the expressive range the human figure brings to art. Live models are used the majority of the time. This course strengthens students' ability to draw the human form in expressive positions as required for many forms of art, including fine art, illustration, graphic design, and animation. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 112 with a grade of C- or higher, or permission of the instructor.
  1. Demonstrate increased proficiency in observational drawing skills introduced in Drawing II; specifically gesture, proportion, and Gross Anatomy.
  2. Draw the figure from life with a focus on its expressive potential.
  3. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of figure drawing that focuses on individual artistic expression.
  4. Create an advanced portfolio that expands on the skills introduced in Drawing II.
  5. Critically analyze advanced figure drawings.

ART 212 : Drawing IV

In this advanced figure drawing course students will continue to study the human figure with an emphasis on personal exploration. Students will further their understanding of form, structure, mass, proportion and relative environment. Students will be encouraged to experiment with new materials and techniques as they relate to the expressive potential of the human figure. Live models will be used the majority of the time. This course will continue to strengthen students' ability to draw the human form in expressive positions as required for many forms of art, including fine art, illustration, graphic design and animation. Two lecture hours and four laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 211 with a grade of C- or higher or permission of the instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate increased proficiency in observational drawing skills introduced in Drawing III; specifically gesture, proportion, and Gross Anatomy.
  2. Draw the figure from life with a focus on its expressive potential.
  3. Demonstrate an advanced knowledge of figure drawing that focuses on individual artistic expression.
  4. Create an advanced portfolio that expands on the skills introduced in Drawing II.
  5. Critically analyze advanced figure drawings.

ART 216 : Introduction to Illustration

This course introduces students to a variety of commercial situations in illustration such as magazine illustration, books, CD covers and/or poster design, to acquaint them with the scope of commercial illustration. The course exposes students to a variety of media including pencil, charcoal, scratchboard, colored pencil, watercolor and/or gouache, pastel, and computer graphics. The course requires students to keep a notebook of sketches, project files, and a portfolio of all assignments. Two hours of critique and four studio hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Not offered every year

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 111 or permission of instructor; ART 112 is recommended as a pre-requisite.

ART 221 : Painting I

This course explores the fundamental techniques of oil painting. Basic problems are designed for beginners as well as students with some previous experience. Realism and Impressionism are studied through still life and landscape projects, while the basics of theory and composition are stressed. This course will help students to understand form and space as a foundation for more advanced painting techniques. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 111 or permission of instructor.

ART 222 : Painting II

This course continues the painting process in oils while students are also introduced to other painting mediums. Increased emphasis on modern painting techniques and styles replaces more traditional methods. While still life and landscape studies continue to be explored, the figure will also be included as will some conceptual problems. Students will be encouraged to develop their own style throughout the process. Two critique/lecture hours and four hours studio per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Spring

Credits

3

ART 225 : Working from the Landscape

Taking impressionism and romanticism as precedents, this course is for those who want to explore their own responses to the landscape. Working outdoors with a variety of media (watercolor, oil, pastel, charcoal, etc.), the course explores issues that have challenged the great landscape painters of all time. Issues such as space, color, light, and composition will be addressed in depth. Subjective responses to the landscape will also be explored such as content, metaphor, personal iconography, and mood. Ultimately, the deeper ramifications of the role of humankind to nature will be addressed through readings and discussions. One 3 hour class meeting per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Summer only

Credits

3

ART 226 : Printmaking: Relief

This course is an introduction to relief printmaking techniques such as woodcut, collagraph, and monotype processes. Students carve images from blocks of wood and linoleum or build plates from cardboard and found materials. Printed either by hand or on the press, both methods offer unlimited potential to create a variety of images. Students learn through lectures, demonstration, hands-on projects, and critique. Projects include one-color prints, reduction, and multi-block processes. Two hours of critique and four studio hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 111 or permission of the instructor.

ART 227 : Printmaking: Intaglio

This course offers instruction in engraving, photo, and dry-point processes and explores core printmaking concepts. Through a number of assignments, students learn to develop a personal vocabulary, while building skills in a variety of traditional and non-traditional printmaking methods. Two hours critique and four studio hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 111 or permission of the instructor or program coordinator.

ART 231 : Sculpture

In this course, emphasis is placed on investigation and experimentation. Students will discuss ideas and the many media available for expressing or illustrating them in physical form. The course reviews some technical aspects of building, along with a hands-on survey of materials. Students will keep notes and drawings in sketchbooks and also will take photographs as idea devices. Field trips to local museums are part of the class. Students go on several walking excursions (near the College) to talk about issues and ideas and find them in our surroundings. Two critique and four studio hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 132 or permission of instructor.

ART 236 : Figure Sculpture I

This course is an introduction to creating figurative sculpture. Students build basic armatures for both portraits and figures and work in clay from the live model. Students develop an understanding of structural anatomy and how it relates to surface forms. Additionally, students are encouraged to explore the expressive potential of the human figure. Basic methods of plaster casting (waste molds) are demonstrated at the end of the semester. Lectures and class discussion focus on both historical and contemporary forms of figurative sculpture. Two lecture/critique hours and four studio hours a week. Instructional support fee applies. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 112 and ART 132 with a grade of C- or higher, or permission of the instructor.
    Through their active participation in critique discussions, as well as through written critique, their ability to:
  1. Evaluate their own work as well as that of other members of the class
  2. Articulate their understanding of the figure in the context of contemporary art
  3. Through their project they will demonstrate an understanding of:
  4. Human anatomy and proportion
  5. Measurement
  6. Gesture and movement
  7. Aesthetics of the human form
  8. Students will demonstrate technical proficiency with:
  9. Oil based clay
  10. Traditional mold making techniques.

ART 240 : Introduction to Visual Communication

This hands-on course provides an overview of graphic design for those considering a career in a related field. Through lectures, readings, demonstrations, class discussions, critiques, exercises, and creative projects, students learn the basics of visual-language and creative-thinking techniques in order to create effective visual communication. They work through the design process and learn how to incorporate communication and basic marketing principles into their problem-solving activities. Students explore color, layout, typography, and imagery as they create graphics, brochures, and newsletters. In this project-based course, the students incorporate the concepts taught and demonstrated into their own work. Students sketch possible design solutions by hand and finalize their work on the computer using Photoshop and a page-layout program. Three class hours plus one studio/lab hour per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

ART 245 : Art for the Child

This course is intended primarily for those planning to work with children. Emphasis is on the nature of artistic expression and how to provide an atmosphere that encourages growth, creativity and imagination. Practical studio experiences using art materials to make crayon resists, collages, puppets, papier mache, print making techniques and other projects will be taught. Students will examine the developmental patterns of children at various age levels through short readings and films. Three class hours a week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

ART 251 : Photography II: Digital

Students build on their knowledge and skill base in photography in this course, which provides a firm technical and aesthetic foundation in contemporary photography practice. Lectures, demonstrations, and projects develop photographic imaging skills utilizing a digital camera and Adobe Photoshop software. Assignments and group critiques provide opportunities for students to connect their emerging technical skills with their personal vision and to understand their work in the context of both the history of photography and contemporary trends. Students must have access to a digital SLR camera with manual controls for this course (an SLR is available for loan on a limited basis if needed) Two lecture/critique hours and four laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0), Technical Literacy (8.0) Fall, Spring.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 256 or ART 151 or permission of instructor or program coordinator.

ART 256 : Photography I

This is a basic introductory course in black and white photography as an art form. It emphasizes developing darkroom skills as well as learning how to operate a 35mm camera. In addition to darkroom printing procedures, including developing negatives and using the enlarger, it covers the use of different films and filters for various effects, printing papers, lighting issues, and the presentation of prints for portfolio. Lectures and demonstrations cover various technical issues as well as the basics of photo history and aesthetic guidelines for photographing, developing, and critiquing work. Students are required to supply their own 35mm camera with adjustable controls. Two lecture/critique hours and four laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall, Spring, Summer.

Credits

3

ART 257 : Photography II: Darkroom

In this intermediate darkroom-based photography course, the emphasis is on advanced study of composition and the elements of good photography, including use of both natural and studio lighting. Further emphasis is placed on the development of the student's ability to apply creative thinking and contemporary techniques in executing meaningful and effective photographs. Students should have a foundation in photographic practices including basic black and white darkroom techniques and use of an adjustable camera. Lectures and class discussion incorporate aesthetics, art criticism, and art history, as well as the communication of meaning through photography. Projects and group critiques help the student develop an individualized visual language, problem solving, and craftsmanship. Students must supply their own 35mm print camera with adjustable controls. Two lecture/critique hours and four darkroom hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 256 or permission of the instructor or program coordinator.

Corequisites

ART 256 or permission of the instructor or program coordinator.
  1. Demonstrate their ability in ideation, problem solving, intuitive exploration, and aesthetics (lighting, design, creativity).
  2. Demonstrate their technical proficiency with the 35 mm camera (aperture, shutter speed, film, lens, and exposure, darkroom and printing techniques, lighting techniques, both using natural light and studio lights).

ART 260 : Computer Graphics

This course provides an overview of page layout, scanning, illustration, and image manipulation on the computer. Industry-standard graphics programs on the Mac are used such as Adobe Illustrator, InDesign, and Photoshop. Through lectures, software demonstrations, and hands-on exercises and projects, students acquire the basic skills and knowledge to use the computer as a design tool. Class meets for two lecture hours and four lab hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0), Technical Literacy (8.0). Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

ART 261 : Graphic Design I

This course introduces basic graphic design concepts, tools, and images. The intent is to strengthen visual and conceptual aspects of image making while exposing students to the graphic design field. The focus of this course is on developing a range of styles, media, and techniques for graphics creation. Two critique and four studio hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 111 or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

ART 260 or permission of instructor.

ART 262 : Graphic Design II

This course is a continuation of ART 261. It further develops the design process through projects that explore graphic/textural relationships using the written word and visual imagery. The course focuses primarily on the development of visual language as a means of conveying information through effective methods of design. It implements contemporary and traditional skills and methods. It also covers the investigation of printing, production, and service bureaus. Six class hours per week. Instructional Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 261 and ART 266 are recommended.

ART 265 : Artists’ Books

The creation of artists' books is approached through a number of fine art media. The book format as a structure for communication and art making is the primary focus. Various methods such as collage, montage, drawing, photocopy imaging, computer imaging, and printmaking are implemented. Personal anecdotes, sociopolitical perspectives, and other sources for image making are explored. Artists' books are original works of art that can be held, and therefore provide a different experience for the viewer. Two class hours a week. Fall, Spring

Credits

1

ART 266 : Typography Design

This course introduces typography, the art of organizing letters in space and time. The course covers all aspects of typography through lectures, demonstration, and studio work. It explores the history of the alphabet, written and drawn from primitive times, through the invention of printing from moveable type to the present. Students immerse themselves in the culture of typography and begin to understand the social and aesthetic importance of the visual word. The course further sensitizes students to the continuing evolution of letterforms, to problem-solving, and to the aesthetic use of display and text type through a series of exercises and projects. Two lecture/critique hours and four studio hours a week. Two lecture/critique hours and four studio hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 111 or permission of instructor or program coordinator; ART 260 recommended.

Corequisites

ART 111 or permission of instructor or program coordinator; ART 260 recommended.

ART 267 : Publication Design

Students learn the fundamentals of designing publications, focusing on typographic systems and the hierarchy of information and using a grid for multi-page documents. The course introduces electronic page-layout using industry-standard page-software such as InDesign. Students acquire the basic skills and knowledge to design multi-page documents through lectures and hands-on exercises and projects. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 260 and ART 266, or permission of the instructor or program coordinator.

Corequisites

ART 260 and ART 266, or permission of the instructor or program coordinator.

ART 271 : Web Design I

This course introduces students to the process of creating a website, with an overview of organizational issues, marketing concerns, navigation, typography on the Web, and other design considerations. It uses industry-standard imaging software and graphical interface-based web design software such as Adobe Photoshop and Dreamweaver. The course uses lectures, software demonstrations, exploration and analysis of existing websites, hands-on exercises, and projects to enable students to acquire the basic skills and knowledge to create web pages for the World Wide Web. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0), Technical Literacy (8.0). Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 260 recommended, or previous Photoshop experience.

Corequisites

ART 260 recommended, or previous Photoshop experience.

ART 272 : Web Design II

This course introduces the fundamentals of interactive design theories and their applications to web design. Students will integrate design principles, image creation, text, video, sound and simple animations to create dynamic websites. The course will emphasize use of multimedia to achieve specific communication goals for a client. Scripting and storyboarding will be introduced as part of the design process. Students will produce an interactive multimedia website that demonstrates their use of the basic concepts and principles of interactive design. Two lecture and four studio class hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 273 : Advanced Web Design Studio

This course provides students with a hands-on opportunity to apply their web design skills to develop functional and effective websites that meet specific real-world objectives. It focuses on communication design issues related to the creation of complex websites, including development of content and communication strategies, information architecture, prototypes and testing site usability, and workflow management. Students integrate their application of these issues with their facility with color, image-creation, typography and composition to create a culminating portfolio-quality project. Two lecture and four studio class hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 276 : Multimedia Design

This course teaches students the basic conceptual, design, and technical components of creating digital multimedia projects. Good design is key to effective interactive multimedia development. The course focuses on the creative design process, including interface design, information design, and design that occurs over time and space and incorporates images, typography, audio, video, and animation components. Lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on projects using industry-standard software such as Director and Premiere enable students to create a portfolio-quality multimedia project for the Web or CD-ROM. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0), Technical Literacy (8.0). Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 260 recommended.

ART 280 : Electronic Imaging

This course focuses on creative and technical issues related to the production of digital images for multimedia and the Web. It emphasizes concept development and application of design principles and color theory to imaging for visual storytelling. Technical issues include storyboarding, drawing for the moving image, image creation, and photo manipulation using industry-standard imaging software such as Adobe Photoshop. Students acquire the knowledge and skills required to create compelling image sequences for linear and non-linear narratives using the digital medium through lectures, examples of professional work, and hands-on projects. Two hours critique/lecture and four hours studio per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 260 or permission of instructor.

ART 281 : Web Animation

Animation is becoming an essential component of multimedia and web design. This course requires a strong foundation in drawing and design. It builds on this foundation and introduces animation design concepts such as character development, timing, sequencing, nuancing, and style. Students apply computer animation techniques, using industry-standard animation programs such as Macromedia Flash to create two-dimensional animation sequences. Completed projects demonstrate the use of typography and illustration to convey a specific concept. Two lecture and four studio class hours per week. Instructional Support Competency met: Humanities (6.0), Technical Literacy (8.0). Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 260; ART 113 or drawing experience recommended.

ART 282 : Character Animation

This course examines concepts, characters, and storyboards for character animation design and production. It emphasizes creating movement and expression using hand-drawn and electronically-processed image sequences. Character animation design practice focuses on a range of screen-based applications, including animation in information design and narrative animation, as well as experimental animation. Students study the basic principles of classical animation and produce a character cameo. They learn the basics of motion perception and the principles of character animation as well as the basics of vector animation, 3-D animation, and combining animation and interactivity in graphical user interfaces. Two lecture/critique hours and four studio hours a week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 112 and ART 260 or permission of the instructor or program coordinator.

ART 285 : Motion Graphics

From TV ads and Flash-based narratives on the Web to the opening credits of movies and TV shows, motion graphics have become an integral part of our day-to-day visual experience. Students in this course explore ways of animating static images and text, as well as compositing digitized elements. They create motion graphics projects using a combination of Adobe After Effects with other video, image, and audio manipulation software. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 260 or permission of the instructor or program coordinator.

ART 292 : Design Studio

This course provides students with hands-on opportunities to apply the design and production skills they have gained to real-world web and print projects. The class functions as a design studio with a creative director, art directors, designers, copywriters, illustrators, photographers, and production staff. Students learn and apply practical skills related to design studio work, including meeting clients, creating design briefs, creating budgets, projecting costs, and developing projects from initial research through brainstorming, thumbnails, comps, and final production (pre-press for print projects, publishing for Web projects). Students work in typical design studio teams to integrate their application of these issues with their design and production work to create client-driven projects. Two lecture/critique and four studio class hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0). Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ART 262 or ART 267 or ART 271 or ART 276 or COM 112 or CIT 132 or permission of instructor or program coordinator.

Corequisites

ART 262 or ART 267 or ART 271 or ART 276 or COM 112 or CIT 132 or permission of instructor or program coordinator.