Business

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

BUS 101 : Introduction to Financial Literacy

This course will provide students with the basic knowledge of financial literacy, including the basic knowledge of budgeting and saving, banking, credit reporting, credit cards, debt management, insurance (auto, home, life), and retirement planning. BUS 101 will be waived for students who have taken BUS 112. One lecture hour per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

1
    Students who successfully complete this course should be able to:
  1. Define and discuss basic terms used in contemporary personal financial planning.
  2. Explain the functional role basic personal financial planning and its impact on an individual success and individual compliance with tax laws and regulations.
  3. Define ethics as it relates specifically to basic personal financial planning as well as to business and to society generally.
  4. Demonstrate ability to prepare a basic individual personal financial plan.
  5. Explain the importance starting retirement planning and saving at an early age.
  6. Perform basic individual financial activities such as balancing a checking account monthly and appropriate use of credit.

BUS 111 : Business and Financial Mathematics

This course provides a presentation of mathematical calculations related to business analysis. It includes solving for unknowns such as present and future values. Selected accounting topics, retailing and consumer mathematics, payroll records, bank statement reconciliations, information concerning corporate stocks and bonds, as well as mutual funds, and business statistics used to make decisions are covered. This course emphasizes critical thinking. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning (4.0) Fall, Spring, Summer.

Credits

3
  1. Develop and manipulate analytic skills to evaluate information regarding retail, consumer, and banking mathematics (i.e. fractions, decimals, percentages).
  2. Categorize payroll records and taxes to record and report the correct results to the proper entry.
  3. Compare multiple investment strategies.
  4. Research various statistical methods to help make business decisions.
  5. Generate equations to formulate and enhance logic development related to business finances.
  6. Examine personal finances.

BUS 112 : Personal Financial Planning

This course will provide students with the basic knowledge to manage their personal finances including the basics of saving, debt management, and investing for retirement via 401k, IRAs, and annuities. Three class hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Demonstrate the required knowledge in preparing a monthly budget.
  2. Demonstrate the required knowledge of the U.S. Banking System which includes deposits, loans and interest rates
  3. Calculate Present Values and Future Values using a financial calculator.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of the Federal Reserve System.
  5. Prepare a Financial Plan which includes all components (budgeting and tax planning, managing liquidity, planning and financing large purchases, protecting wealth and income through various types of insurance plans, investing money, and retirement and estate planning).
  6. Demonstrate the proper use of credit and how to maintain a good credit rating.
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of annuities.

BUS 113 : Introduction to Business Functions and Practices

This course provides a general survey of the functions and practices of a business and the external institutions and organizations that facilitate the operation of business units. The course introduces students to the various functional activities of business organizations. It provides an overview of careers in accounting, marketing, general management, human resource management, finance, purchasing, and production and operations management. College study skills, critical thinking, and time management techniques are integrated into the course presentation. Students will learn how to develop a job search strategy, including how to prepare a resume and a cover letter and to prepare for job interviews. Three class hours a week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Explain how external factors of culture, economics, legal requirements, political activity, technology, the internet and the news media affect the operation of a business.
  2. Explain basic functions of accounting, marketing, general management, human resource management, finance, purchasing, and production and operations management within a business.
  3. Demonstrate the skills needed to develop ideas and make strategic business recommendations based on ethics, proper research, analysis, and critical thinking.
  4. Apply basic marketing principles to recommend and develop a strategy to solve a marketing business challenge.
  5. Develop a job search strategy, including the preparation of a resume, and a cover letter.

BUS 114 : Small Business Planning

This is an introductory course to familiarize the student with the critical aspects of small business planning through the development of a business plan. It is recommended for any individual who would like to learn, hands-on, how to start a business properly. Topics presented include the basic procedural steps to forming a business, innovative marketing strategies, the borrowing/lending process, and QuickBooks overview. Upon completion, all participants will have completed a solid business plan. One hour of lecture per week over twelve weeks. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

1
  1. All students will be actively engaged in the procedural steps to starting a business.
  2. Upon completion, all students will have written a solid business plan. The business plan encompasses key elements to properly forming a business including: Business structure, organization name, trademark, insurance, accounting, legal, and marketing considerations.
  3. By the end, they will have gained valuable insight into the complex steps of starting a business.

BUS 115 : Fundamentals of an Enterprise

This course is designed for students in majors other than Business Administration such as Information Technology, Health Sciences, and Engineering, who will likely be working within a profit or not-for profit enterprise. Topics such as global operating environments, economic systems, organizational structure, and management systems will be discussed. This course is not open to students majoring in Business Administration. One lecture hour per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

1
  1. Understand, define and grasp key terms and principles involved in the components of business.
  2. Obtain a broad understanding of business and be able to employ strategies for making timely, and profitable decisions within an organization.
  3. Learn processes and techniques used in various business organizations.
  4. Explain how factors of culture, economics, legal requirements, political activity, technology, the internet and the news media affect the operation of organizations in a global environment.
  5. Describe the key actions to be taken to effectively and efficiently utilize organizational resources to achieve stated purpose and goals.
  6. Demonstrate leadership and develop a professional growth plan for lifelong learning.

In addition to fulfilling the learning objectives stated at the beginning of each covered chapter, a student should also be able to:

  1. Provide an understanding of business basics.
  2. Generate an understanding of ethics in business.
  3. Create an appreciation for the role business plays in a global economy.
  4. Develop an understanding of the basic business functions of management, finance, marketing, human resource management, production, operations management, economics, and consumer behavior.
  5. Learn how to perform critical thinking when making major business decisions.
  6. Enhance business communication skills through the use of written and verbal exercises.
  7. Develop an appreciation for contemporary issues and potential future business trends.

BUS 116 : Introduction to Logisitics

This course provides general knowledge of current management practices in logistics management. This course will teach students the foundations in product distribution, such as inventory control, warehousing, packaging, and distribution planning. Fall

Credits

3

1. Differentiate physical distribution, inventory management and materials management.
2. Distinguish between the concepts of supply chain management and logistics terminology.
3. Explain inventory controls and warehousing.
4. Develop decision strategies in transportation and traffic management.

BUS 117 : Inventory Management

This course emphasizes the relationships of inventory and warehouse management to customer service and profitability of the wholesale distributor. The course will focus on the role of computerized systems and resulting information for effective management of inventory and the warehouse under various conditions

Credits

3

The student should be able to:
1.  Demonstrate an understanding of warehousing terms and concepts.
2.  Apply new warehouse developments and trends.
3.  Explain inventory fundamentals and warehouse management.
4.  Explain inventory information and inventory technology.
5.  Identify warehousing operational principles.

BUS 155 : Business Ethics

This course is an examination of the moral, legal, and social dimensions of decision making in business-related situations. Actual business cases are analyzed in terms of morality, legality and social considerations. The course will provide students with multifaceted views, allowing them in their analysis to come to business decisions that incorporate ethical standards. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Ethical Dimensions (7.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
  1. Explain how factors of culture, economics, legal requirements, political activity, technology, the internet and the news media affect the operation of organizations in a global environment.
  2. Demonstrate the skills needed to develop ideas and make decisions based on ethics, proper research, analysis, and critical thinking.
  3. Explain the relationship of business, government, and society.
  4. Explain the stakeholder approach to business, society, and ethics.
  5. Demonstrate the interpersonal skills to communicate effectively through operating in teams, writing, participating in classroom discussions, and in-class presentations.

BUS 205 : Warehouse Center Distribution Center

This course provides a foundation for the role of transportation from a micro and macro perspective in supply chain management. It discusses and evaluates the theoretical and managerial dimensions of transportation in supply chains, including regulations and public policy. This course focuses on air, water, rail, pipeline, and road transportation emphasizing their operating and service characteristics, cost structure and current challenges. Strategic activities and challenges involved in the movement of goods through the supply chain will be reviewed and evaluated. 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS 116

1.  Describe the basic concepts of transportation management and its essential role in demand fulfillment.
2.  Identify the key elements and processes in managing transportation operations and how they interact.
3.  Explain the critical role of technology in managing transportation operations and product flows.
4.  Define the requirements and challenges of planning and moving goods between countries.
5.  Apply standard metrics and frameworks to assess the performance of transportation operations.

BUS 215 : Global Supply Chain Management

This course provides knowledge of globalization and international trade, supply chain relationships, supply chain strategies, collaborative planning, procurement and ethical standards, information flows and technology, measuring and managing logistic performance, supply chain vulnerabilities, sustainable supply chain systems, reverse logistics, service supply chains, and emerging supply change designs.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BUS 116

BUS 251 : Business Law

An introductory course in laws applicable to business transactions. Covers a basic study of the federal and state court systems as well as criminal, tort, and contract law. Three class hours a week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Sophomore standing or permission of department chair.

  1. The Student will learn to understand case law and court decisions as they relate to all forms of business activities.
  2. The student will be introduced to the basic legal principles that impact business relationships and commercial activities.
  3. The student will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the organization and procedures of the federal and state court systems, the sources of business law in the global legal environment and the impact of the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights in the business context.
  4. The student will learn the legal function of contracts in the business world, their impact upon business participants, consumers, debtors, creditors, employers and employees.
  5. The student will learn the law of agency and be exposed to the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC).
  6. The student will be able to recognize the different approaches to ethical decision-making, and to identify social responsibility issues in the business world.
  7. The student will gain a basic understanding of current criminal and tort laws as they apply to U.S. businesses.
  8. The student will gain a basic understanding of contracts: the elements of a contract; what constitutes a contract; what is a breach of contract; and what remedies are available for a breach.

BUS 253 : Corporation Finance

A study of the forms and sources of financing available to large and small business. Emphasis is placed on financial analysis, financial planning, working capital management and source of short- and long-term financing. Basic concepts of investment analysis are introduced. Three lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC 102 or ACC 101 with a C or better and permission of instructor.
    In addition to fulfilling the learning objective stated at the beginning of each covered chapter, the student should have a basic understanding of:
  1. The function of financial managers.
  2. How to compute ratios and use ratio analysis.
  3. Understand the importance of cash flows to the financial manager.
  4. Time value of money.
  5. Interest rates, bond valuation, and stock valuation.
  6. How to use net present value and other investment criteria.
  7. The importance of capital budgeting.
  8. Short and long term financing.

BUS 265 : Investments

Students will learn about capital markets and the investment management industry. They will learn how to make sound investment decisions through the use of fundamental analysis. Students will learn about mutual funds, stock and bond investments and create a portfolio management software. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC 102 or BUS 112 or BUS 253 or permission of the department chair or division dean.
  1. Identify the role capital markets play in our economy and society.
  2. Apply the economic concepts and measures, such as supply and demand, GDP, business cycles, interest rates, inflation and exchange rates and their impact on asset values.
  3. Differentiate between the fundamental and technical analysis approach to asset valuation and the terminology used.
  4. Build an optimal client portfolio with allocation of wealth between risky assets and risk free securities.
  5. Apply an asset allocation strategy based upon a client's risk tolerance.
  6. Make recommendations when allocating 401K plan assets, mutual fund assets, or bond fund assets.