Animal Science

Classes

ANS 101 : Introduction to Animal Care & Management

This course introduces general concepts for the daily care of most companion animals. Topics include a basic understanding of the role of animals in society, safety, animal welfare issues, and species-specific requirements for good health and husbandry practices. Emphasis is placed on feeding, breeding, health maintenance, and housing of various species (dogs, cats, ferrets, birds, reptiles, amphibians, rodents, small exotic pets, etc.). Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the issues related to the animal care industry. A training certificate by Animal Care Technology Programs is available with successful completion and testing in this course. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
  1. Students will be able to discuss issues related to animal welfare and industry.
  2. Understand and use appropriate animal industry terminology in oral and written communications.
  3. Identify common animals species, breeds, and sexes.
  4. Provide daily care and record-keeping according to species husbandry requirements.

ANS 103 : Applied Animal Behavior

This course provides the foundation for a comprehensive and coherent understanding of behavior analysis as it relates to facilitating the interaction and care of captive and companion animals. Topics include fundamental principles of learning and behavior, normal and abnormal behavior patterns, communication, social development, and the prevention and correction of problem behaviors. Upon completion, students will be able to recognize behavior patterns and assess, prevent, and correct problem behaviors. Fall, Summer

Credits

3
  1. Distinguish between human and animal based cognition.
  2. Understand and utilize appropriate animal behavior terminology.
  3. Analyze exhibited animal behavior based on species/breed/sex, environment, and posturing.
  4. Implement humane behavior modification techniques.

ANS 107 : Medical Terminology for Animal Science I

This section of the two-part course is designed to give the animal care worker a vocabulary which will facilitate and enhance their communication with veterinary medical professionals. The focus will be on learning the major components (prefixes, suffixes, combining root terms, abbreviations, units of measure, animal body structure, position, and disease terminology) of veterinary medical terms, synthesizing useful medical terms from the components, and interpreting the meaning of technical information containing common veterinary medical terms. One lecture hour per week. 1 Credit Spring

Credits

1
  1. Define, spell, and pronounce key components of veterinary medical terminology, abbreviations and symbols.
  2. Decode and synthesize common veterinary medical terminology.
  3. Communicate using proper veterinary medical terminology in both oral and written formats.

ANS 108 : Medical Terminology for Animal Science II

This course is a continuation of ANS 107. In this course, students will continue to explore medical terms needed to enhance accuracy in communications with veterinary professionals. Areas of specific interest will be terminology dealing with body cavities, specific body systems, the functions of their parts, and associated surgical terms and clinical procedures. Students are expected to learn and be able to interpret the meaning of technical information containing specific, systematic veterinary medical terms. One lecture hour per week. 1 Credit Fall

Credits

1

Prerequisites

ANS 107 with a grade of C or better.
  1. Acquire a basic vocabulary of common veterinary medical terms associate with animal body systems, their functions, and related medical procedures.
  2. Define, spell, and pronounce terminology associates with animal body systems and medical procedures.
  3. Demonstrate understanding of the parts and functions associated with animal body systems.
  4. Communicate using proper veterinary medical terminology in both oral and written formats.

ANS 115 : Community Health and Zoonosis

This course introduces the basics of disease transmission with particular emphasis on disease transferred from animals to humans. Topics include zoonotic diseases, modes of transmission, symptoms, and personal protection of animal care technicians through immunization. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss zoonotic diseases and the animal care technician's role and responsibility related to the control of such diseases. A training certificate by Animal Care Technology programs is available upon successful completion and testing in this course. A passing grade of a C (73) or better in the laboratory portion of this course is required to receive a final passing grade for the course. Two lecture and three laboratory hours per week. 4 Credits Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Understand the development of modern zoonosis recognition and testing through historical perspectives.
  2. Acquire an understanding of the relevant zoonosis, their signs, diagnosis, treatments, and control practices.
  3. Acquire clinical skills in flea detection, fecal analysis, gastrointestinal parasite identification, and bacterial culturing and identification.

ANS 121 : Animal Handling and Restraint

This course introduces the principles and techniques of animal handling and restraint. Topics include handling and control techniques for lab animals, domestic animals, and other varieties, as well as species specific techniques for medical procedures. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate proper handling techniques for animals that are frightened, injured, confined, diseased or trapped. A passing grade of a C (73) or better in the laboratory portion of this course is required to receive a final passing grade for the course. Two lecture and three laboratory hours per week. 4 Credits Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

ANS 103 with a grade of C or better.
  1. Understand how to interact safely with a variety of animals, knowing potential dangers associated with individual species.
  2. Apply animal behavior analysis to decision making regarding animal restraint procedures to decrease the stress of the animal and maintain safety for animals and people alike.
  3. Comprehend and recognize issues that may arise from animal restraint procedures and understand protocol for addressing them.
  4. Acquire the reasoning and skills to properly restrain animals humanely for specific activities or medical procedures.

ANS 147 : Veterinary Office Procedures

This course provides a fundamental knowledge of the administrative aspects of working in a veterinary practice. Topics include veterinary practice ethics, staff roles and limitations, professionalism, front office duties, communication skills, marketing, accounting systems, and veterinary practice computer software experience. A training certificate by Animal Care Technology Programs is available with successful completion and testing in this course. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3
  1. Implement rules of ethical and professional conduct, decision making, appearance, and communication in the classroom setting.
  2. Discern the delineation and overlap of duties within a veterinary facility.
  3. Triage phone calls for all clients, as well as, communicate and problem solve accurately, politely, and with respect.
  4. Display confidence in handling difficult clients and financial issues.
  5. Explain the staff's role and impact on marketing.
  6. Utilize Cornerstone software to: add/update clients/patients, create and customize an estimate, Invoice the client, create a recheck appointment and take a
  7. payment.

ANS 153 : Animal Health and Diseases

This course is designed to introduce the veterinary assistant to the nature of health versus disease and many common diseases encountered in veterinary practice. A systems approach is used and students are encouraged to bring questions from the work experience to class. Within each system, congenital, infectious, traumatic, and other disease processes are explored as are the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches appropriate to each system. Three lecture hours per week. 3 Credits Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ANS 115 with a grade of C or better

Corequisites

  1. Understand what health is, signs of a healthy animal, factors that effect health, and management procedures to insure health of animals.
  2. Develop skills in recognizing signs that may indicate disease or illness.
  3. Acquire a baseline knowledge of common animal diseases, their signs, diagnostic procedures, and accepted treatments.
  4. Participate in case study and antidotal scenarios to apply reason and knowledge in the assessment of health.

ANS 201 : Anatomy & Physiology of Domestic Animals

An introductory course in the comparative anatomy and physiology of vertebrate animals to include bird and mammal dissections. Emphasis is placed on distinguishing gross anatomical structures, critical organ systems, and functional relationships with a comparative focus on gastrointestinal tracts, respiratory systems, and reproductive systems. Notation of the normal anatomy and physiology with references made to deviation from the norm, which might constitute a diseased state, and extrapolating learned material to additional species is also covered. A passing grade of C (73) or better in the laboratory portion of this course is required to receive a final passing grade for the course. (For Career Pathway, take BIO 111, for Transfer Pathway, take BIO 121.) Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 111 or BIO 121 with a grade of C or better.

  1. Identify major organs and structures of birds and mammals.
  2. Explain the associated nature of organs and structures in the healthy functioning of the animal body.
  3. Compare normal and abnormal morphology of the animal body.
  4. Compare aspects of the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract, and reproductive tracts of different classifications of animals.

ANS 205 : Clinical Methods

This course is an introduction to clinical skills consisting of both lecture and laboratory work. Veterinary nursing procedures and teamwork will be thoroughly discussed. Lecture topics include physical examinations of domestic animals, animal behavior and training, nutrition, animal diseases, preventive health care and immunity, restraint/handling, and client education/communication. Laboratory experiences include restraint, physical examinations, parenteral medication administration, and other clinical nursing skills. Medical terminology will be reinforced in all aspects of lecture and lab. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. A passing grade of a C (73) or better in the laboratory portion of this course is required to receive a final passing grade for the course. 4 Credits Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

ANS 121 with a grade of C or better

Corequisites

  1. Utilize OSHA safety guidelines in the laboratory and in medical waste disposal.
  2. Create SOAP notes.
  3. Give a generalized physical exam, taking histories, temperature, pulse, respiration, etc.
  4. Demonstrate proficiency in wound care, bandaging, CPR, and rescue breathing.
  5. Acquire skills in blood collection and hematology analysis.
  6. Demonstrate proficiency in vaccine administration and associated documentation procedures.
  7. Perform urinalysis and apply to health evaluation.
  8. Acquire skills in fluid therapy administration.
  9. Understanding of principles and practices of dentistry.
  10. Apply client skills and animal handling skills in a clinical environment.

ANS 216 : Veterinary Pharmacology

This course covers the basic principles of pharmacology, including general drug types, dosage forms, drug administration, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. Drug packaging, labeling, and dispensing are covered, as are record keeping for pharmacologic agents. The legal and ethical factors involved in handling pharmaceuticals are considered. Prescription notation and review of drug calculations are also included. The course surveys the many pharmacologic agents used in veterinary medicine, emphasizing the modes of action, indications, contraindications, methods of administration, and appropriate client communication for these agents. Two lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

2

Prerequisites

ANS 107 with a grade of C or better; MTH 119, MTH 125 or MTH 131 with a grade of C or better. (For Career Pathway, take MTH 125. For Transfer Pathway, take MTH 119 or MTH 131.)

  1. Recognize common pharmaceuticals used for specific treatments in domestics animals and be able to discuss their dosage and associated side effects.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency at reading, filing, recording, and administration of topical, oral, and injectable medications as prescribed and in accordance with FDA requirements.
  3. Convert English and metric units.
  4. Demonstrate accuracy in dosage calculation and preparation of pharmaceuticals.

ANS 221 : Veterinary Health Care Field Experience & Seminar

This course provides 20 hours per week of skill training and usage under the supervision of licensed veterinary staff with site visits and skill evaluations from Animal Care Science faculty periodically throughout the semester. This course also requires a one hour per week seminar to provide additional topics for increased career success and address issues and experiences gained at the host facility in a timely and educational manner. One lecture hour per week and twenty laboratory hours. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ANS 115, ANS 121, ANS 153, and ANS 205 with a grade of C or better.

  1. Apply interpersonal skills within a veterinary setting.
  2. Demonstrate professionalism in performance of veterinary assistant duties within a veterinary setting.
  3. Complete ACT Programs Veterinary Assistant Skills Validation Check-List.

ANS 222 : Humane Euthanasia Seminar

This course covers the principles and practices of humane euthanasia as outlined by the American Veterinary Medical Association. Topics include effective and humane euthanasia concepts, the necessity for euthanasia, the related personal and professional stress, understanding the grief process, and facilitation of compassionate client and staff communications and interactions. Two lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

2
  1. Examine how the roles of animals have changed in society and family settings.
  2. Define euthanasia, pain, and suffering.
  3. Identify signs of the stages of grief and when professional intervention may be required.
  4. Apply the steps of the grief process to euthanasia education and communication with clients.
  5. Employ coping mechanisms for dealing with euthanasia related stress in personal and professional settings.

ANS 240 : Animal Nutrition and Feeding

This course covers the fundamentals of animal feeding and nutrition. Topics include nutrient requirements and their functions, digestive tracts, diet formulation, and classification. Upon completion, students will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of appropriate feeding guidelines for a variety of animals contingent upon stage of development and disease condition. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MTH 119, MTH 125 or MTH 131 with a grade of C or better. (For Career Pathway, take MTH 125; for Transfer Pathway, take MTH 119 or MTH 131).

  1. Understand the classifications of nutrients, their functions, and general feed sources.
  2. Apply species specific anatomy to understanding of nutrition, digestion, and feed requirements.
  3. Understand the feed industry and process as it applies to the ability to provide wholesome rations for animals.
  4. Integrate nutrient requirements and nutrient analysis of feed content to formulate appropriate animal diets.
  5. Problem solve for nutrition deficiency and feed intake issues.
  6. Present the nutritional information relevant to a specific species.