Spanish

Classes

SPA 101 : Elementary Spanish I

This course offers beginning training in the four skills: reading, writing, speaking and aural comprehension. An introduction to Hispanic culture is included. One hour of laboratory practice is required. Only for students with no language background or one to two years of high school Spanish with a C average. Students with an A or B average are encouraged to enroll in the 102 level. Three lecture hours and one language laboratory hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend

Credits

3
  1. Read, write and orally reproduce the basic alphabetical sounds of the Spanish Language.
  2. Initiate, minimally sustain, and close simple, basic communicative tasks, limited to greetings, introductions, numbers, requesting information, time, classroom items, nationalities, place of origin, and foods.
  3. Use the appropriate basic grammatical structures associated with classroom, invitations, requests, thanking people, expressing needs, likes, and dislikes, describing people, animals and things, expressing possession, expressing obligation, describing routine activities, expressing preferences and feelings.
  4. Read simple authentic texts and discuss their content.
  5. Write small passages using acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures.
  6. Recognize names and other identification features of the Spanish speaking countries.

SPA 102 : Elementary Spanish II

A continuation of training in the four basic skills: reading, writing, speaking and aural comprehension. Cultural and daily living topics are included. Prerequisite: SPA 101 or two years of high school Spanish with an A or B average. Three class hours and one lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend

Credits

3
  1. Read, write and orally reproduce more complex grammatical structures, using the present, past and future tenses.
  2. Initiate, minimally sustain, and close simple, basic communicative tasks, related to identification of family, daily life, housing, weather and sports.
  3. Express physical and emotional states.
  4. Read simple authentic texts and discuss their content.
  5. Examine and translate audio and video clips.
6. Describe fundamental historic, social and political aspects of the Spanish speaking countries.

SPA 201 : Intermediate Spanish I

A review and continuation of Spanish grammar plus additional training in the four skills: reading, writing, speaking and understanding. Readings and discussions based on cultural topics, contemporary literature, newspaper articles, Internet sources and video. Prerequisite: SPA 102 or three years of high school Spanish with a C average. Three class hours and one language lab per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend

Credits

3
  1. Read, write and orally reproduce more complex grammatical structures, using other modes of the past and future tenses as well as the Imperfect tense.
  2. Initiate and maintain a normal conversation based on daily events.
  3. Read and interpret more complex texts and discuss their content.
  4. Explain the contents of audio and video materials.
  5. Express subjective attitudes with the appropriate use of the Subjunctive.
6. Describe fundamental historic, social and political aspects of the Spanish speaking countries.

SPA 202 : Intermediate Spanish II

A continuation of SPA 201. Further grammar review based on readings and compositions. Intensive practice of spoken language. More advanced readings from Hispanic literature and culture. Frequent compositions and written exercises. Prerequisite: SPA 201 or four consecutive years of high school Spanish with a C average. Three class hours and one language lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Fall, Spring; Evening/Weekend

Credits

3
  1. Converse in a clearly participatory fashion.
  2. Initiate, sustain, and bring to closure a wide variety of communicative tasks.
  3. Express subjective attitudes with the appropriate use of the Subjunctive.
  4. Initiate and maintain a normal conversation based on daily events.
  5. Read and interpret more complex texts and discuss their contents.
  6. Explain the contents of audio and video materials.
7. Formulate own ideas about cultural similarities and differences in the Spanish speaking communities in the United States and the world.

SPA 213 : Spanish for Spanish Speakers

A review and continuation of Spanish grammar, plus additional training in the four skills--reading, writing, speaking, and understanding--for Hispanic bilingual students whose home language is Spanish, but whose dominant and school language is English. This course includes readings and discussions based on the cultures and voices of the major Hispanic groups in the United States: Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, and Cubans. It presents high-interest topics through a variety of narrative styles, voices, registers, and genres. Students practice spelling and grammar as well as study false cognates, Anglicisms, and idiomatic expressions. The course is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPA 102, or three years of high school Spanish with a C average, or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours and one language laboratory hour per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
  1. Read, write and orally reproduce more complex grammatical structures, using other modes of the past and future tenses as well as the Imperfect tense for Hispanic bilingual students whose main language is Spanish but whose dominant and school language is English.
  2. Initiate and maintain a normal conversation based on daily events.
  3. Read and interpret more complex texts and discuss their content.
  4. Explain the contents of audio and video materials.
  5. Express subjective attitudes with the appropriate use of the Subjunctive.
6. Describe fundamental historic, social and political aspects of the Spanish speaking countries including the United States.

SPA 321 : Spanish for Interpreters

This course develops students’ Spanish language skills to ensure oral competency in a variety of interpreting settings. Students refine their extensive Spanish vocabulary and acquire abilities in terminology research, dictionary usage, and glossary building. Students engage in practical communication activities found in various community settings. This course covers medical terminology and basic terminology used in the fields of human services and education. The course is taught primarily in Spanish. Prerequisite: Passing score on the oral and written entrance examination for the Spanish/English Community Interpreting program. Three hours of lecture per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Show more confidence to face the real situation of interpreting.
  2. Compare and contrast important aspects of the oral and written Spanish from Spain and Latin American and Spanish speakers in the United States.
  3. Use a variety of linguistic resources available for the interpreters: medical dictionaries, specific vocabulary lists, sites in the Internet.
4. Employ an extensive Spanish medical terminology.

SPA 322 : The Spanish Language in the World

This course is a general overview of the Spanish language in the world: the birth of the Spanish idiom, the evolution of the language throughout the centuries, and its place in today’s society. The instruction focuses on the following basic aspects of the language: the study of the diversity of the communities that speak the language in today’s world and the interpretation of the chronology of this romance language as an organized linguistic system. Special attention is given to the Spanish language in immigrant communities. Texts used to study the language include fiction, poetry, critical essays, and audio-visual materials (films, CDs). Prerequisite: SPA 321 or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Develop the ability to identify the various communities of Spanish speakers in the world.
  2. Recognize some important differences between classic and contemporary Spanish.
  3. Appreciate the importance of other languages in the formation of the Spanish language.
  4. Recognize specific themes and motifs of the periods of Spanish literature.
  5. Connect some of their own life experiences with the Spanish immigrant literature.
6. Develop a better understanding of literary text written in Spanish.

SPA 351 : Advanced Spanish Literature

A detailed study of a major work or works of Spanish and Latin American authors. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or equivalent. Three lecture hours per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Not offered every year

Credits

3
  1. Explain the development of literature written in Spanish in chronological sequence.
  2. Describe social and historical context in which literary works were produced.
  3. Explain literary genres, literary styles, and art movements associated with the works studied.
  4. Analyze literary works and explore the significance to Spanish speaking communities.
  5. Demonstrate intermediate to advance oral and written language proficiency and basic literary analysis skills.
6. Compare Hispanic cultures to learner’s own cultures.

SPA 352 : Advanced Spanish Literature II

A detailed study of a major work or works of Spanish and Latin American authors. Prerequisite: SPA 202 or equivalent. Three lecture hours per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Not offered every year

Credits

3
  1. Explain the development of literature written in Spanish in chronological sequence.
  2. Describe social and historical context in which literary works were produced.
  3. Explain literary genres, literary styles, and art movements associated with the works studied.
  4. Analyze literary works and explore the significance to Spanish speaking communities.
  5. Demonstrate advance oral and written language proficiency and basic to intermediate literary analysis skills.
6. Compare Hispanic cultures to learner’s own cultures.

SPA 353 : Spanish/English Interpreting

This course examines the process of interpreting through hands-on experiences with both Spanish and English as target and source languages in the process of interpreting. Starting with consecutive interpreting and ending with simultaneous interpreting, students apply interpreter theory, exercise process tasks, and practice fundamental interpreting skills and standards in a variety of simulated settings. Students discuss, develop, and practice strategies to deal with problematic Spanish and cross-cultural situations. Pre or co-requisite: SPA 354. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Apply professional standards for translations.
  2. Practice norms and guidelines from state agencies and professional organizations.
  3. Produce clear and polished written translation of all sorts of documents from the medical and legal fields (reports, documents from the Social Services; medical follow-up instructions; medical forms, etc.).
  4. Engage in translation sub-skills, such as revising and editing.
  5. Translate common mainstream/community documents (forms, birth certificates, questionnaires, etc.).
6. Identify regional variations of medical and legal terminology.

SPA 354 : Written and Sight Translation for English and Spanish

This course focuses on the theory, process, and techniques of written and sight translation. Students engage in a variety of hands-on experiences with translation and editing. Materials may include government and other agency forms such as applications; reports; certificates; and school, social service, and medical documents. The course prepares students for practical, community-based translations. Students review the English and second-language skills necessary to produce clear and polished written and sight translations. Prerequisite: HUM 156. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Put into practice the standards and code of ethics for medical or legal interpreters.
  2. Use interpreting skills in a variety of medical or legal situations.
  3. Listen to tapes and provide oral translation into the target language (Spanish or English).
  4. Interpret information given on the telephone or on site.
  5. Conduct consecutive interpreting.
6. Conduct simultaneous intepreting.