Mathematics

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

MTH 060 : Topics in Developmental Mathematics

This course presents selected topics in developmental math to support students registered for a paired college-level mathematics course. Topics will be selected by the Mathematics Department to coincide with those needed in the college-level course. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Corequisites

Students who successfully complete this course might be able to:

  1. Demonstrate study skills and habits necessary to succeed in a college math class.
  2. Perform all arithmetic operations on whole numbers, integers, fractions and decimals (rational numbers), including order of operations, exponential notation, and comparing numbers.
  3. Use the properties of real numbers (commutative, associative, and distributive) to manipulate and evaluate arithmetic expressions.
  4. Convert between fraction notation, decimal notation, and percent notation and solve applications.
  5. Use the concept of perimeter, area, and volume in real world applications.
  6. Find mean, median, and modes of data set.
  7. Read pictographs, bar graphs, histograms, circle graphs, and line graphs.
  8. Convert between standard notation and scientific notation.
  9. Apply ratios and proportions to real world applications.
  10. Use the metric and American measurement systems to solve real-world applications, including unit conversions.
  11. Evaluate formulas and solve formulas for a given variable.
  12. Graph linear equations and inequalities, find the slope and intercepts of lines, and solve related real-world applications.
  13. Write an equation of a line in slope-intercept from, point-slope form, and standard from and solve related real-world applications.
  14. Solve systems of linear equations graphically, by substitutions, by elimination, including real-world applications.
  15. Solve linear inequalities algebraically and systems of linear inequalities in two variables graphically, including real-world problem applications.
  16. Evaluate exponential expressions, use rules of exponents with integer exponents.
  17. Evaluate, add, subtract, multiply, and divide polynomials.
  18. Determine and factor greatest common and factor an expression by grouping.
  19. Factor trinomial of the form x^2+bx+c, perfect square trinomial, the difference of two squares, sum and differences of two cubes.
  20. Solve quadratic equations by factoring, including real-world applications.
  21. Simplify and perform arithmetic operations on rational expressions.
  22. Simplify and perform arithmetic operations on radical expressions and expressions with rational exponents.
  23. Solve rational and radical equations.

MTH 111 : Technical Mathematics for Fire Science

This course provides the necessary mathematical tools for solving problems encountered in physics, chemistry, and fire science courses. This course is required of Fire Science students. Topics included are operations with whole numbers, fractions and decimals, percents, ratio and proportion, graphing, powers and roots, basic algebra, basic geometry and measurement, including metrics. Examples of mathematics applied to fire science are given. Three lecture hours per week. Competency Met: Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning (4.0) - Fire Science only. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Perform all operations with fractions.
  2. Perform all operations with decimals.
  3. Measure and calculate distance, area, volume, and weigh.
  4. Work with percentages.
  5. Work with ratios and proportions.
  6. Calculate powers and roots.
  7. Work with simple algebra.
  8. Evaluate formulas.
  9. Work with lines, triangles, plane figures and solids.

MTH 115 : Culinary Math

This course is aimed at Culinary Arts students and provides the mathematical tools necessary for solving problems encountered in the modern kitchen. Topics include: recipe scaling including measurement conversions, percentages as they relate to as-purchased, edible-portion, and yield, and calculations as they relate to menu costs and pricing, profit and loss, payroll and taxes. Competency Met: Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning(4.0) - Culinary Arts only. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
    Upon successful completion of this course students should be able to:
  1. Scale a recipe, including any unit conversions and other scaling considerations.
  2. Calculate costs-as purchased, edible portion, etc., menu pricing using perceived value pricing and contribution margin pricing.
  3. Calculate revenue and expenses including sales tax, guest check totals, gratuities, discounts, and calculate payroll expenses.
  4. Analyze profit and loss including percent increase and decrease, gross and net profit, and break-even point.

MTH 119 : Fundamental Statistics

This course provides a survey of statistical methods, with examples taken from sociology, psychology, education, and related fields. A minimum background in mathematics is assumed. Topics include descriptive statistics, measure of central tendency and variability, probability, binomial and normal distributions, estimation, correlation, regression sampling distributions, and hypothesis testing. Competency met: Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Introductory Algebra Competency.  

  1. Create and interpret distributions of data using various types of charts and graphs.
  2. Determine the appropriate measures of center and dispersion for different types of distributions and use them to describe the properties of the distributions, and use the Empirical Rule.
  3. Perform least squares regression and use the results to describe and make inferences about data.
  4. Determine and use simple probability to construct a discrete probability distribution and determine the expected value and use to solve applications.
  5. Solve problems using the normal distribution and sampling distribution of the mean and proportion (with sigma known and unknown) including finding probabilities and constructing confidence intervals.
  6. Set up and perform hypothesis tests.

MTH 119S : Fundamental Statistics with Support

This course provides a survey of statistical methods, with topics from developmental math provided in a just-in-time as needed basis. Examples are taken from sociology, psychology, education, and related fields.  Topics include descriptive statistics, measure of central tendency and variability, probability, binomial and normal distributions, estimation, correlation, regression sampling distributions, hypothesis testing and the related developmental math to support these topics.  Three lecture hours and three support hours per week.  Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Corequisites

  1. Create and interpret distributions of data using various types of charts and graphs.
  2. Determine the appropriate measures of center and dispersion for different types of distributions and use them to describe the properties of the distributions, and use the Empirical Rule.
  3. Perform least squares regression and use the results to describe and make inferences about data.
  4. Determine and use simple probability to construct a discrete probability distribution and determine the expected value and use to solve applications.
  5. Solve problems using the normal distribution and sampling distribution of the mean and proportion (with sigma known and unknown) including finding probabilities and constructing confidence intervals.
  6. Set up and perform hypothesis tests.
     

MTH 125 : Modern College Mathematics

This course gives the student a better appreciation and understanding of mathematics with a minimum of algebraic manipulation. Topics may be selected from the following: sets, logic, inductive reasoning, elementary number theory, consumer mathematics, probability, statistics, and number systems. Competency met: Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Introductory Algebra competency. 

  1. Use inductive and deductive reasoning to solve several types of problems.
  2. Use the properties and tools of sets to solve applications and determine if an infinite set is countable.
  3. Perform arithmetic operations in additive, multiplicative, ciphered, and positional-valued number systems and in other bases, and discuss early computational methods and tools.
  4. Use the properties of the real number system to solve applications; recognize if a series is arithmetic or geometric, determine the nth term, and find the sum of the first n numbers and use to solve applications and determine the golden ration of Fibonacci sequences in applications.
  5. Determine if a finite mathematical system is an algebraic group and/or a commutative group and explain their conclusion; perform group operations and modular arithmetic.
  6. Use the formulas and concepts of simple and compound interest, installment purchases, APR, mortgages, annuities, sinking funds, and retirement investments to solve applications.
  7. Solve applications with probability, odds, expected value, counting, tree diagrams and conditional probability.
  8. Determine measures of center and dispersion of data and create frequency distributions and graphs; determine the linear correlation coefficient and line of best fit and use in applications.

MTH 125S : Modern College Math with Support

This course gives the student a better appreciation and understanding of mathematics with topics from developmental math provided in a just-in-time as needed basis.  Topics may be selected from the following: sets, logic, inductive reasoning, elementary number theory, consumer mathematics, probability, statistics, and number systems, all with the related developmental math to support these topics.  Three lecture and three support hours per week.  Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Corequisites

  1. Use inductive and deductive reasoning to solve several types of problems.
  2. Use the properties and tools of sets to solve applications and determine if an infinite set is countable.
  3. Perform arithmetic operations in additive, multiplicative, ciphered, and positional-valued number systems and in other bases, and discuss early computational methods and tools.
  4. Use the properties of the real number system to solve applications; recognize if a series is arithmetic or geometric, determine the nth term, and find the sum of the first n numbers and use to solve applications and determine the golden ration of Fibonacci sequences in applications.
  5. Determine if a finite mathematical system is an algebraic group and/or a commutative group and explain their conclusion; perform group operations and modular arithmetic.
  6. Use the formulas and concepts of simple and compound interest, installment purchases, APR, mortgages, annuities, sinking funds, and retirement investments to solve applications.
  7. Solve applications with probability, odds, expected value, counting, tree diagrams and conditional probability.
  8. Determine measures of center and dispersion of data and create frequency distributions and graphs; determine the linear correlation coefficient and line of best fit and use in applications.

MTH 127 : Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I

This course develops understanding of the mathematical content of number and operations at the deep level required for successful elementary school teaching in ways that are meaningful to pre-service elementary teachers. Topics include: place value and arithmetic models; mental math; algorithms; pre-algebra; factors and prime numbers; fractions and decimals; ratio; percentage and rates; integers; and elementary number theory. Competency met: Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Intermediate Algebra Competency. 

  1. Apply the properties of closure, commutativity, associativity, and identity to addition and multiplication of whole numbers.
  2. Represent subtraction of whole numbers using the take-away and missing addend approaches.
  3. Construct the addition and multiplication facts table for any base from 2 through 10 and read it “backwards” to find subtraction and division facts respectively.
  4. Perform all arithmetic operations in bases 2 through 12
  5. Describe “less than” and “greater than” with whole numbers using the operation of addition.
  6. Describe multiplication of whole numbers using repeated addition and rectangular array approaches.
  7. Represent division of whole numbers using the missing factors and repeated subtraction.
  8. Explain division problems involving zero.
  9. Explain whole number exponents using repeated multiplication.
  10. Use the sieve of Eratosthenes to find prime numbers.
  11. State and apply the fundamental theorem of arithmetic.
  12. Apply tests for divisibility by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12
  13. Find the prime factorization of a number to find all of its factors.
  14. Find the Greatest Common Factor and Least Common Multiple of any given pair of numbers using the prime factorization method.
  15. Determine equality of fractions.
  16. Express a fraction in the simplest form.
  17. Perform any arithmetic operation on rational numbers and integers, providing rationale for your computations.
  18. Solve applied problems involving ratios, proportions, and percents.
  19. Change any fraction to its decimal form and vice versa.
  20. Define and apply the distributive property of multiplication over addition.

MTH 127S : Math for Elementary Education Teachers with Support

This course develops understanding of the mathematical content of number and operations at the deep level required for successful elementary school teaching in ways that are meaningful to pre-service elementary teachers.  Topics include: place value and arithmetic models, mental math, algorithms, pre-algebra, factors and prime numbers, fractions and decimals, ratio, percentage and rates, integers, elementary number theory, and the related developmental math to support these topics, covered in a just-in-time as needed basis. Three lecture and three support hours per week.
Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Corequisites

  1. Apply the properties of closure, commutativity, associativity, and identity to addition and multiplication of whole numbers.
  2. Represent subtraction of whole numbers using the take-away and missing addend approaches.
  3. Construct the addition and multiplication facts table for any base from 2 through 10 and read it “backwards” to find subtraction and division facts respectively.
  4. Perform all arithmetic operations in bases 2 through 12.
  5. Describe “less than” and “greater than” with whole numbers using the operation of addition.
  6. Describe multiplication of whole numbers using repeated addition and rectangular array approaches.
  7. Represent division of whole numbers using the missing factors and repeated subtraction.
  8. Explain division problems involving zero.
  9. Explain whole number exponents using repeated multiplication.
  10. Use the sieve of Eratosthenes to find prime numbers.
  11. State and apply the fundamental theorem of arithmetic.
  12. Apply tests for divisibility by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12.
  13. Find the prime factorization of a number to find all of its factors.
  14. Find the Greatest Common Factor and Least Common Multiple of any given pair of numbers using the prime factorization method.
  15. Determine equality of fractions.
  16. Express a fraction in the simplest form.
  17. Perform any arithmetic operation on rational numbers and integers, providing rationale for your computations.
  18. Solve applied problems involving ratios, proportions, and percents.
  19. Change any fraction to its decimal form and vice versa.
  20. Define and apply the distributive property of multiplication over addition.

MTH 128 : Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II

This course is a continuation of MTH 127. Topics include algebraic reasoning and representation, statistics, probability, geometry, and measurement. Three lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A grade of C- or higher in MTH 127.

Students who complete this course will:

  1. Construct and work with algebraic expressions, functions, and equations and understand their connection with geometry.
  2. Illustrate and manipulate planar and spatial objects.
  3. Perform conversions using both the “English” and metric systems.
  4. Determine various measurements of geometric objects, such as area, perimeter and volume.
  5. Apply the concept of congruence to geometric figures, including triangles.
  6. Understand the basics of descriptive statistics, in both visual and numerical formats.
  7. Define probability and how it relates to both statistics and geometry.
  8. Solve counting problems involving the multiplication principle, permutations and combinations.

MTH 131 : Elements of College Mathematics

Topics for this course include linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions; break-even analysis; matrix algebra; simplex method of linear programming; and the mathematics of finance. Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Introductory Algebra Competency. 

  1. Solve application problems for linear equations, specifically Supply and Demand and Break Even Analysis.
  2. Solve systems of Linear Equations using matrices.
  3. Determine the solution of a linear programming problem using both graphical method and the simplex method.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of financial mathematics that includes determining which formula to use, using the formula correctly, and understanding the answer.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

MTH 131S : Elements of College Mathematics with Support

Topics for this course include linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions, break-even analysis, matrix algebra, simplex method of linear programming, the mathematics of finance, and the related developmental math to support these topics, covered in a just-in-time as needed basis. Three lecture and three support hours per week.  
Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Corequisites

  1. Solve application problems for linear equations, specifically Supply and Demand and Break Even Analysis. 
  2. Solve systems of Linear Equations using matrices.
  3. Determine the solution of a linear programming problem using both graphical method and the simplex method.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of financial mathematics that includes determining which formula to use, using the formula correctly, and understanding the answer.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.

MTH 132 : Calculus with Applications

This course is a continuation of MTH 131. Topics include limits, continuity, differential calculus, applications of differential calculus, integral calculus, and applications of integral calculus. Competency met: Quantitative and Symbolic Reasoning. Three lecture hours per week. Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A grade of C- of higher in MTH 131.

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
  2. Solve problems involving limits and continuity of functions.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the derivative of a function using the definition of the derivative and the formulas for products, quotients, and chain rule along with the applications of the derivative, mostly curve sketching and optimization.
  4. Solve indefinite and definite integrals using simple integral formulas and the substitution method along with applications of the integral.

MTH 152 : College Algebra

This course is designed to present advanced algebra in order to prepare students for precalculus. Topics include elementary functions, and their graphs, basic manipulations of functions, and the graphical impact of changes to a function, linear and quadratic functions, polynomial functions, rational functions, solving equations, and applications of topics cited. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Intermediate Algebra Competency.

  1. Students who complete this course successfully will:
  2. Demonstrate study skills and habits necessary to succeed in a college math class.
  3. Find the domain and range of a function graphically and, where appropriate, algebraically.
  4. Determine if a function is even, odd, or neither graphically based on symmetry and algebraically.
  5. Identify relations and functions, use the vertical line test to determine if a relation represents a function.
  6. Graph elementary functions, piece-wise defined functions, and transformations (translation, stretch/shrink, reflection) of basic functions.
  7. Analyze and graph different types of functions including linear function, quadratic function, polynomial functions, and rational functions.
  8. Solve real world problems modeled by linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions.

MTH 152S : College Algebra with Support

This course is designed to present advanced algebra in order to prepare students for pre-calculus along with topics from developmental math provided in a just-in-time as needed basis.  Topics include elementary functions, and their graphs, basic manipulations of functions and the graphical impact of changes to a function, linear and quadratic functions, polynomial functions, solving equations, applications of and related developmental math to support these topics. Three lecture and three support hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Corequisites

Students who complete this course successfully will:

  1. Demonstrate study skills and habits necessary to succeed in a college math class.
  2. Find the domain and range of a function graphically and, where appropriate, algebraically.
  3. Determine if a function is even, odd, or neither graphically based on symmetry and algebraically.
  4. Identify relations and functions, use the vertical line test to determine if a relation represents a function.
  5. Graph elementary functions, piece-wise defined functions, and transformations (translation, stretch/shrink, reflection) of basic functions.
  6. Analyze and graph different types of functions including linear function, quadratic function, polynomial functions, and rational functions.
  7. Solve real world problems modeled by linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions.

MTH 172 : Precalculus with Trigonometry

This course is designed to present both pre-calculus and trigonometry topics in order to prepare students for calculus. Topics include inverse functions and relations, exponential and logarithmic functions, right triangle trigonometry, trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, the inverse trigonometric functions, solving trigonometric equations, conic sections, introduction to the polar coordinate system, and applications of topics cited. Four lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

A grade of C- or higher in MTH 152 or a score of 237 or higher on the Advanced Algebra and Functions (AAF) Accuplacer Test.

Students who successfully complete this course will: 

  1. Demonstrate study skills and habits necessary to succeed in a college math class.
  2. Determine if a given function is one-to-one and if so, find the inverse function.
  3. Evaluate logarithmic expressions.
  4. Simplify, graph, and solve exponential and logarithmic functions and equations.
  5. Use growth and decay formula to solve application problems.
  6. Convert measures of angles between degrees and radians.
  7. Find trigonometric function values for any multiple of 30, 45,  60 and 90 degrees.
  8. Use the unit circle and right triangle trigonometry to identify and graph the six trigonometric functions.
  9. Prove trigonometric identities using basic, co-function, double angle, half-angle, power reducing, sum/difference, and Pythagorean identities.
  10. Use inverse trigonometric functions to simplify expressions and to solve trigonometric equations.
  11. Use the Law of Sines and Law of Cosines to solve triangles including real world applications.
  12. Analyze the graphs exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric function, and conic sections.

MTH 214 : Calculus I

This course is an introduction to calculus and provides students with initial exposure to limits and continuity, the derivative, and differentiation and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions, as well as applications of differentiation. Four lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

A grade of C- or higher in MTH 172 or a score of 250 or higher on the Advanced Algebra Functions (AAF) Accuplacer test.

  1. Define the limit of a function and determine its value graphically, numerically and analytically.
  2. Determine if a function is continuous at a given point.
  3. Compute the derivative of a function.
  4. Apply the concept of differentiation to various applications such as extrema, curve sketching and approximation.
  5. Define an antiderivative.
  6. Develop methods to find both approximate and exact areas under a curve.

MTH 215 : Calculus II

This course is a continuation of MTH 214. Topics covered include: applications of the definite integral; techniques of integration; parametric equations; polar coordinates; and infinite sequences and series. Four lecture hours and one computer laboratory hour per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

A grade of C- or higher in MTH 214

  1. Compute the area between curves, volumes of solids of revolution, the average value of a function and arc length of a function.
  2. Compute anti-derivatives of functions using several techniques.
  3. Use numerical techniques to approximate definite integrals.
  4. Determine whether sequences and series converge or diverge.
  5. Approximate functions as Taylor polynomials.
  6. Analyze, graph and compute the derivatives of parametric equations and functions in polar coordinates.

MTH 243 : Discrete Structures I

This is the first course in a two-course sequence that presents the topics from discrete mathematics and logic needed in the study of computer science, focusing on mathematical reasoning, discrete structures, combinatorial analysis, algorithmic thinking, and various applications. Topics include: propositional logic; set theory; methods of proof; basic number theory; recursive definitions; and counting problems. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A grade of C- or higher in MTH 152, or a score of 237 or higher on the Advanced Algebra and Functions (AAF) Accuplacer Test.

  1. Gain knowledge in the logical basis of mathematics.
  2. Learn how to write proofs and gain insight into various strategies to approach proving a statement.
  3. Understand the basic structures in mathematics, including sets, functions, sequences, sums and matrices.
  4. Perform modular arithmetic and work with congruences in various applications such as cryptography.
  5. Learn the concepts of proof by induction and recursion.
  6. Solve basic counting problems, including those using the Pigeonhole Principle.
  7. Work with permutations, combinations and manipulate various binomial identities.

MTH 244 : Discrete Structures II

This is a continuation of MTH 243, Discrete Structures I. Topics include: advanced counting problems; relations; graph theory; Boolean algebra; and languages and grammars. Three lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A grade of C- or higher in MTH 243.

  1. Solve basic counting problems, including those using the Pigeonhole Principle.
  2. Work with permutations, combinations and manipulate various binomial identities.
  3. Understand the inclusion-exclusion principle and apply it to real-world problems.
  4. Gain knowledge in the basic understanding of relations.
  5. Develop an understanding of graph theory including directed and undirected graphs as well as trees and their applications to computer science.
  6. Understand the concept of Boolean functions and its application to circuits.

MTH 251 : Fundamental Business Statistics

This course serves as an introduction to statistics with applications to business scenarios. Topics include: methods of collecting, tabulating and graphically representing data; measures of central tendency, dispersion, skewness, and kurtosis; basic probability rules; binomial and normal probability distributions; sampling distributions; and estimation. Applications will be stressed throughout the course. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Introductory Algebra Competency, or concurrent registration in MTH 131.

  1. Solve problems by applying and interpreting descriptive statistics.
  2. Solve problems by applying basic rules of probability.
  3. Solve problems by utilizing the Normal Distribution.
  4. Construct confidence intervals to solve problems.

MTH 252 : Statistics for Decision Making

This course demonstrates the use of statistical methods in business decision-making situations. Topics included are: sampling and estimation; hypothesis testing; linear regression and correlation; contingency tables; and statistical quality control. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A grade of C- or higher in MTH 251.

  1. Find and interpret confidence intervals to estimate population parameters.
  2. Perform hypothesis tests on one and two samples.
  3. Perform linear regressions and interpret results.
  4. Perform ANOVA tests.
  5. Develop and analyze statistical control charts.

MTH 253 : Calculus III

This course is a continuation of MTH 215. Topics include: two- and three-dimensional vectors; vactor functions; partial derivatives; multiple integrals; and vector calculus. In addition to the four-hour lecture, a one-hour lab is required each week. Four lecture hours and one computer laboratory hour per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

A grade of C- or higher in MTH 215.

  1. Define the concept of vectors and solve problems using vectors in 2D and 3D applications.
  2. Apply the concepts of limits and differentiation to multivariate functions, including applications.
  3. Apply the concept of integration to multivariate functions.
  4. Develop various methods to solve both double and triple integrals.
  5. Bring together the concept of vectors and calculus in terms of a line integral.
  6. Use the different types of methods to solve line integrals.

MTH 254 : Ordinary Differential Equations

This course covers the methods of solving ordinary differential equations and applications in engineering and the sciences. Topics include equations of the first order, higher order equations, power series solutions and applications. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A grade of C- or higher in MTH 215.

  1. Solve the first-order differential equations of the following types: the separable equations, the homogeneous equations, the exact equations, and the linear equations.
  2. Solve the second-order homogeneous linear equations with constant coefficients, and solve the non-homogeneous equations by the superposition approach.
  3. Use the Laplace transform to solve linear (first-order and second-order) differential equations with constant coefficients.
  4. Find the power series solutions about the ordinary point of a differential equation.
  5. Solve the system of differential equations using the operator method, and using the Laplace transform method.
  6. Solve the initial-value problems; and work with the applications – using the differential equation model to describe some real-life phenomena.
  7. Locate an approximate solution curve for a first-order differential equation in the direction field; and approximate solutions of the first-order initial-value problems using the numerical methods.