Hospitality

Classes

HOS 121 : Introduction to Travel, Tourism and Hospitality

This course will be taught in three different modules to expose students to the concentration areas of travel, tourism and hospitality. The focus of this course will be introductory in nature. It will provide students with an understanding of how people use their free time, what reasons prompt them to travel and the value they expect from their travel dollar. Each module will provide students with an overview of the specific area of study with an emphasis on industry trends and future developments, terminology and an understanding of interrelationships of the three. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3
  1. Describe the economic size of the tourism, travel and hospitality industries.
  2. Explain how the tourism industry is organized.
  3. Describe the importance of implementing sustainability practices in the tourism industry.
  4. Explain the importance of having an inventory of a community's tourism resources.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the differences between high and low value tourism to a community.
  6. Enter a Destination Management Organization as tourism support staff.
  7. Apply current technology and social media.

HOS 130 : Introduction to Geotourism

This course introduces the Geotourism approach to tourism development as all-inclusive, focusing not only on the environment, but also on the diversity of the cultural, historic, and scenic assets of a place. Geotourism is defined as tourism that sustains or enhances the geographical character of a place, its environment, culture, aesthetics, heritage, and the well being of its residents. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3
  1. Describe the importance of Geotourism.
  2. Identify why Geotourism would sustain the character of a community seeking to draw visitors.
  3. Implement a Cultural Tourism Assessment.
  4. Describe how holistic tourism planning is critical for a community's success.
  5. Work as an entry-level tourism development assistant in a Destination Management Organization.
  6. Describe the need for a Geotourism Stewardship Council.
  7. Apply current technology and social media in all aspects of Geotourism.

HOS 132 : Geotourism Management

This course provides the tools needed by tourism planners, conservationists, businesses, and communities to work together to develop Geotourism plans and products that attract and accommodate the ecotourist, while conserving natural resources and benefiting local people. The course also focuses on environmentally and socially responsible tourism strategies and innovations. It also examines how destinations have improved competitiveness by creating environmentally and socially friendly tourism products and services. Three lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

3
  1. Explain the leadership principles necessary for a Destination Management Organization Professional.
  2. Assist in the assessment of Geotourism in a specified community.
  3. Integrate sustainability into the organization including suggesting a policy, developing action areas and reporting on sustainability.
  4. Integrate sustainability in internal management by identifying issues and action areas.
  5. Describe sustainability in tourism product management and development, and supply chain management.
  6. Define the basic management functions that relate to Geotourism development.
  7. Implement the latest Information Technology for Destination Management Organizations.

HOS 137 : Event Management and Marketing

This course examines the social and economic impact of events planning. Current trends, styles of operations, event coordination, and quality service standards are addressed. The importance of risk management and crisis management in events planning is emphasized. Final project will consist of planning and executing an event. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HOS 121 with a grade of C+ or better.
  1. Identify and arrange the implementation of all essential utility and marketing needs.
  2. Identify the staging and equipment needs to facilitate the functional requirements of the event.
  3. Select the designs, equipment, and providers for the illumination and decorative lighting needs of an event.
  4. Identify the food and beverage needs of the audience, participants, staff, and other stakeholders at an event.
  5. Identify, analyze, and prepare response plans for risks associated with the event project.
  6. Prepare reports that facilitate the timely and efficient distribution of information to event stakeholders.
  7. Integrate the various perspectives of sustainability into event planning.

HOS 140 : Introduction to Casino Operations

This is an introductory course designed to provide students with a history of the gaming industry and the basics of casino management. The course emphasizes discussions involving gaming psychology and ethics and includes an overview of popular betting games. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3
  1. Discuss the history of gaming.
  2. Demonstrate a basic understanding of casino management.
  3. Discuss gaming psychology and gaming ethics.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of basic casino games.

HOS 220 : Group Tour Planning

This course is designed to introduce students to the process and methodologies of planning, operating and evaluating a group tour package. It will discuss the various methods of selling, packaging, operating and promoting a group tour to select markets and also to the general public. This course is intended to provide students with skills needed to operate a group tour movement, negotiate with suppliers, understand contractual responsibilities, handle reservations and documentation, and provide them with a working knowledge of the legal responsibilities and ramifications of group tour management. Also covered will be the role and responsibility of the tour escort before, during, and after the tour. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HOS 121 with a grade of C+ or higher.
  1. Describe the importance of the Motor Coach industry.
  2. Construct a single-day and multi-day Group Tour for a destination.
  3. Implement a tour development program for an attraction.
  4. Explain the economic impact of the group tour market.
  5. Design a brochure to attract the group tour market to a destination.
  6. Apply basic tour guiding techniques.
  7. Apply current technology and social media in Group Tour Planning.

HOS 222 : Tour Destination Planning

This course acquaints the student with a framework to do detailed planning for visits to important tourist destinations in the United States and other nations. The course discusses the cultural, recreational, social, and economic significance of travel. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HOS 121 with a grade of C+ or higher.
  1. Explain how tourism destinations are developed.
  2. Describe the necessity of tourism planning to a community.
  3. Discuss local, regional and national tourism planning concepts with community planners.
  4. Develop strategies that serve the community and the visitors it wishes to attract.
  5. Measure carrying capacity of a tourism attraction.
  6. Educate community professionals about the need to develop tourism in a sustainable manner.
  7. Describe the complexity of establishing standards for development.
  8. Describe how to take a place of interest and create a plan for visitor arrivals.
  9. Apply current technology and social media in the tour destination planning.

HOS 223 : Convention Sales and Service

This course will teach students the basic elements of meeting, convention, and group sales and services. Students will learn how to generate business and to provide the services necessary to create repeat business. Discussions will focus on the operation of a group and convention business. Three lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HOS 137 with a grade of C+ or higher.
  1. Describe the importance of the Meetings and Convention Industry to a city and state.
  2. Analyze target markets that would be interested in a particular convention center.
  3. Step into a meeting and convention support position at a hotel or meeting facility.
  4. Research meeting and convention leads in support of the Convention Center sales team.
  5. Implement a Green Meeting strategy.
  6. Apply current technology and social media in meeting and convention sales and service.

HOS 224 : Hospitality Marketing

This course will deal with the broad scope of marketing and sales activities that take place within the tourism, convention, hospitality, and casino industries. Emphasis will be placed on analysis, structure, and strategy of the marketing department within the tourism, convention, hospitality, and casino businesses. Students will learn about departmental budgets, allocation of resources, market research, media selection, and the effectiveness of a marketing plan. There will be case studies and assigned readings of current marketing trends. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HOS 121 with a grade of C+ or higher.
  1. Explain the importance of high-quality service to the visitor.
  2. Prepare for and undertake a sales call representing a hotel or a tourism destination.
  3. Describe the difference between customer service and customer satisfaction.
  4. Recognize the human resources challenges in the customer service industry.
  5. Explain financial and economic impact on service quality.
  6. Apply current technology and social media in sales efforts.

HOS 226 : Hotel Accommodations Management

Students will gain an understanding of the operational aspects of various departments within a hotel or motel, and the relationship of each department to the hotel as a whole. They will explore the functions of each separate area within the hotel, its operational procedures, staffing, customer service, and changing trends. Also covered will be the different employment opportunities and career paths available within the industry. Three lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

3
  1. Explain the economic significance of the hospitality industry to a nation's economy.
  2. Describe the differentiated market segments within the accommodations sector.
  3. Identify the chain of command of a typical hotel and explain the operational departments within a property.
  4. Define and explain why team spirit is critical for successful accommodation guest services.
  5. Describe the security issues in the accommodations sector of the hospitality industry.
  6. Be eligible for an entry-level front desk position at a hotel.
  7. Describe the importance of high-level service to a hotel.
  8. Educate on the importance of operating accommodations in a sustainable manner.
  9. Apply current technology in hotel and motel management operations.

HOS 228 : Property Management Systems and Revenue Management

This course deals with managing the revenue in a hospitality operation, which is the key to profitability. Yield is money, and Yield Management is a technique to maximize your revenue by managing your room rates day to day. This course teaches the student how to effectively manage a hotel's room rates while analyzing its RevPAR (revenue per available room). Property Management Systems are used to assist a hotel manager to maximize revenue. Interfaces allow all hotel departments to also maximize revenue. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HOS 121, with a grade of C+ or better; BUS 111 with a grade of C+ or better.

Corequisites

BUS 111 with a grade of C+ or better.
  1. Explain the evolution of Revenue Management techniques as first introduced by Bill Marriott.
  2. Describe the adoption and modification of Yield Management by the hotel industry.
  3. Explain what is meant by a customer-centric approach.
  4. Explain how to develop marketing strategies based on SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis.
  5. Explain the concept of Distribution Channels including GDS (Global Distribution Systems) and IDS (Internet Distribution Systems).
  6. Discuss the issue of fair pricing and the ethics of revenue maximization.
  7. Describe the ways in which hospitality businesses use technology to process reservations.
  8. Identify the function of common Property Management Systems interfaces, including Point of Sale systems, energy management systems, electronic locking systems, and guest-operated devices.

HOS 229 : Hospitality Managerial Accounting

This course demonstrates how to use numbers and fundamental accounting to operate a successful hospitality department or business. Focus will be placed on the basics; accounting and financial analysis, financial statements, management reports, budgeting, and forecasting. There will be case study analysis and assigned readings of current financial management topics. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ACC 101 and HOS 121 with a grade of C+ or better.
  1. Identify the three fundamental financial statements used in a hotel or business.
  2. Outline the methods of hospitality financial analysis and the financial management cycle.
  3. Describe how to utilize internal hotel revenue reports in forecasting future revenues.
  4. Explain the importance of hotel revenue, profit analysis and variation analysis.
  5. Outline how to utilize STAR (Smith Travel Research) reports and ratio analysis in revenue management.
  6. Prepare an operational budget utilizing one of the four most common methods.
  7. Identify how capital expenditures budgeting affects hotel operations.

HOS 231 : Principles of Community Based Tourism

This course examines the range of cultural and heritage assets that can become viable tourism attractions. It looks at ways of linking quality cultural heritage tourism to community development, from effective planning and marketing to community involvement and partnership approaches. Three lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HOS 121 with a grade of C+ or better.
  1. Describe the importance of community-based tourism to cities and towns.
  2. Host a meeting to assemble stakeholders in community tourism.
  3. Explain how community-based tourism is the essence of destination development.
  4. Develop a community-based tourism project.
  5. Educate the community about how community-based tourism projects could be developed in a sustainable manner.
  6. Apply current technology and social media in the development of community-based tourism projects.

HOS 255 : Event Design

An event planner needs to know all the different aspects of the event plan. This overview course will incorporate many courses currently offered, but in smaller detail. Topics covered include decor, use of colors in linen, lighting and flowers, mixology, appropriate wine for different menus, menu construction for nutritional variances, service techniques, food and bar cost percentages, levels of service and specialty cake construction. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

    During and/or upon completion of this course, utilizing correct quiz or test responses and/or by practical demonstrations, according to the grading standards of the instructor, the College and accepted professional industry standards, while demonstrating sufficient mastery of the subject matter, the students will be able to:
  1. Select the appropriate linen, flowers, lighting and additional decor based on your theme
  2. Select appropriate food and wine pairings, based on the theme and budget
  3. Demonstrate the correct techniques for mixology and bar managements, according to ServSafe standards
  4. Prepare an accurate food and beverage cost analysis
  5. Correctly demonstrate different dining room service styles
  6. Demonstrate a knowledge of various types of specialty cakes and desserts appropriate to the theme.

HOS 265 : Special Event Planning Capstone

Every aspect of the Hospitality Industry holds special events. This course will provide the student with the opportunity to demonstrate skills learned through all the program courses. Students will work on planning two different events, one as a stand alone event at the college and the second in conjunction with the Culinary Capstone courses. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

    During and/or upon completion of this course, utilizing correct quiz or test responses and/or by practical demonstrations, according to the grading standards of the instructor, the College and accepted professional industry standards, while demonstrating sufficient mastery of the subject matter, the students will be able to:
  1. Identify and explain the dimensions of an Event Experience
  2. Develop a site plan based on the physical space to maximum effectiveness and meet goals and objectives
  3. Determine awards, souvenirs, and promotional materials appropriate for a specific event
  4. Select an appropriate food and beverage menu based on the budget and preferences of the client
  5. Document and explain the best practices for maintaining event plans and evaluation