Communication

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

COM 101 : Fundamentals of Public Speaking

In this course, students study and apply theoretical concepts of communicating in public settings to diverse audiences. Students research, organize, write, and deliver oral presentations for a variety of purposes. Techniques to address public speaking apprehension, critical thinking, information literacy, and technology skills, verbal and non-verbal communication, and active listening are covered in this course. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Oral Communication, Humanities Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the College's Reading and English placement tests; or C or better or concurrent enrollment in ENG 091 or ENG 092. 

  1. Apply communications concepts that are appropriate to the audience and circumstance.
  2. Apply communication techniques connected to overcoming apprehension.
  3. Deliver at least four graded effective presentations based on scholarly research.
  4. Apply effective nonverbal communication techniques.
  5. Analyze contemporary issues of the human experience through critique and discussion.
  6. Evaluate significant contemporary oral presentation as a form of creative expression.

COM 106 : Introduction to Communication and College Success

Strategies and resources that promote college success are explored and applied to communication in this foundational course for communication majors. Students explore the fundamentals of human communication, especially the process of exchanging meaning. The course also examines aspects of communication including theory, interpersonal, nonverbal, mass media and organizational communication, and the impact of emerging technologies on communication. Students examine careers in the field, acquire technical competencies needed to be successful in communication, and conduct both academic and internet research. Competency met: First Year Experience (9.0). Three hours of lecture per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Define communication within the context of intrapersonal, interpersonal, public speaking and mass communication.
  2. Analyze strengths and challenges of verbal and nonverbal communication.
  3. Examine ethical issues related to human communication.
  4. Research potential career options in the field of communication.
  5. Utilize available college-based technology services.
  6. Demonstrate what is expected of a college student as outlined in the BCC student handbook and college catalogue.

COM 111 : Mass Communication

This course focuses on the mass communication process and a survey of primary mass media such as books, newspapers, magazines, recordings, movies, television, radio, and the web. The course examines the development and power of the mass media and their role in contemporary society, and explores the potential impact of media consolidation, demassification, and technology on editorial direction and mass audiences. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Global Awareness (5.2) Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Explain how basic concepts of communication theory apply to mass media.
  2. Identify key figures and events related to the development of major mass media and emerging new media.
  3. Explain the potential effects of media on an increasingly diverse society.
  4. Discuss some of the basic ethical, global, and legal issues related to the mass media.
  5. Assess how emerging technologies may influence the shape of mass media.

COM 112 : News Writing and Reporting

Students learn principles and practices of news writing and reporting for contemporary media. The course examines the fundamentals of good journalism, the role of reporters and editors in the news organization, and decision-making in the newsroom. Students analyze the qualities of good news writing and develop their skills in writing leads and organizing stories. The course explores differences in reporting for print, broadcast, and web-based media, and examines how reporters cover the news on beats and specialty areas such as general assignment, police and fire, city hall, sports, health, and politics. Students consider issues related to ethics and fairness and the impact of media consolidation and rolling deadlines on news content. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Explain the traditions and practices of good journalism.
  2. Describe the structure of specific types of stories and analyze key elements of a story.
  3. Demonstrate news writing skills utilizing the qualities of good writing as it relates to contemporary media.
  4. Discuss ethical and fairness issues related to the practice of contemporary news media, including an examination of the basic legal parameters within which reporters and editors function.
  5. Conduct a structured interview for a writing assignment.
  6. Analyze the impact of media consolidation on editorial freedom in the newsroom and recognize the impact of emerging technologies on the operation of news organizations.

COM 113 : Interpersonal Speech

The study of speaking and listening as it involves spoken language, nonverbal communication and feelings, specifically within interpersonal and small group settings. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities; Oral Communication - Early Childhood, Elementary Education, and Human Services only. Fall, Spring, Summer.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Define interpersonal communication.
  2. Explain fundamental theoretical communication concepts related to human communication.
  3. Encode and decode verbal and nonverbal messages in order to increase shared meaning.
  4. Identify and apply effective listening skills.
  5. Explain ethical issues related to interpersonal communication and create strategies to help address some of those issues.
  6. Cultivate self-awareness and monitor self within interpersonal relationships.

COM 114 : Professional Speaking

This course is a study of speaking technique involving use and development of specific professional language, appropriate verbal and non-verbal communication, and visual aids within a variety of professional settings. Students study and apply theoretical concepts of communicating in public settings to the inherently diverse audiences in the professional work world. Students research, organize, write, and deliver oral presentations for a variety of purposes. Techniques to address public speaking apprehension, critical thinking, information literacy, and technology skills, verbal and non-verbal communication, and active listening are covered in this course. Speeches using appropriate visual aids are outlined, prepared, delivered and evaluated. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Oral Communication, Humanities Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Passing scores on the College's reading and writing placement tests, or concurrent enrollment in ENG 091 or ENG 092.  

  1. Apply communications concepts that are appropriate to the diverse professional audience and circumstance.
  2. Apply communication techniques connected to overcoming apprehension.
  3. Deliver effective presentations based on scholarly research.
  4. Apply effective nonverbal communication techniques for a multicultural audience.
  5. Analyze contemporary issues of the human experience through topic selection and self and peer critique.
  6. Evaluate significant contemporary oral presentation as a form of creative expression.

COM 157 : Television Production

This course addresses the fundamental principles of television production. Students produce media using both studio and field equipment, learning studio and control room operating procedures, basic lighting, camera operation, script writing, and nonlinear editing using Final Cut Pro or equivalent. Students organize materials and projects using the Mac OS operating system; backup media on external hard drives, flash drives and/or DVDs; and upload projects to an online video server. Students identify message, audience, and goal for each project and consider ethical aspects related to the field of television production. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Operate television studio and field equipment.
  2. Describe fundamental principles of television production.
  3. Discuss ethical dimensions related to the field of television.
  4. Define what comprises a target audience.
  5. Write scripts for specific assignments that address message, audience and goal.
  6. Edit video using non-linear techniques.
  7. Manage projects using operating systems.
  8. Assemble projects using different forms of media.
  9. Assess other projects based on criteria discussed in the course.
  10. Operate television studio and field equipment
  11. Describe fundamental principles of television production
  12. Discuss ethical dimensions related to the field of television
  13. Define what comprises a target audience
  14. Write scripts for specific assignments that address message, audience and goal
  15. Edit video using non-linear techniques
  16. Manage projects using operating systems
  17. Assemble projects using different forms of media
  18. Assess other projects based on criteria discussed in the course

COM 159 : Video Field Production and Editing

Students learn basic concepts of digital video field production and editing and gain hands-on experience through assignments that take them from initial planning of a project through location shooting and final editing. The course addresses pre-production planning, shot composition, lighting and audio on location, and linear editing concepts and techniques. Emphasis is on pre and post-production planning and editing and project completion. Students prepare their projects for distribution through different forms of media and uploading to the internet. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Operate television studio and field equipment.
  2. Describe fundamental principles of television production.
  3. Define a target audience.
  4. Write scripts for specific assignments that address message, audience, and goal.
  5. Edit video using non-linear techniques.
  6. Create video assignments that reflect the ethical standards discussed in the course.
  7. Manage projects using operating systems.
  8. Assemble projects using different forms of media.
  9. Assess other projects based on criteria discussed in the course.

COM 160 : Intercultural Communication

This course focuses on the human communications process as it occurs at the intercultural level in order to assist the student to engage in successful cross-cultural interaction. Attention will be given to differences and similarities in the patterns of communication across national cultures (for example, Americans and Japanese), as well as between members of different cultures within the same nation (for example, Portuguese Americans and African Americans). Competency met: Oral Communication (2.2), Multicultural Perspective (5.3), Humanities (6.0) Fall, Spring, Summer.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Define culture, communication, cultural border, multiple perspective and prejudice.
  2. Apply fundamental theoretical communication concepts to intercultural communication.
  3. Identify culturally-determined values, behaviors and ways of thinking in themselves, their families and others.
  4. Examine how cultural borders and prejudices affect relationships.
  5. Explain ethical issues related to intercultural communication and create strategies to help address some of those issues.

COM 211 : Strategic Social Media Communication

This course focuses on social media and its significant and enduring impact on society and the field of communication. Students will examine social media, as a whole and by individual channels, and translate the various meanings, purpose and impact. Topics will include classifying types of social media, discussion of social media’s effects, identifying the intended audiences, selecting the proper social media for messaging. Through interactive classroom sessions and exercises, case studies and journals, students will identify and implement the strategic uses and practices of social media for personal and professional use.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 101

Corequisites

Pre- or co-requisite: COM 111 or permission of instructor or program coordinator.

COM 212 : Field Experience - Student Newspaper Practicum

This course provides students experiential learning through the production of the student newspaper, with targeted instruction and guidance provided by a Communication Instructor who teaches COM 112 News Writing and Reporting and the Faculty/Staff Adviser of the student newspaper, The Hawk. This course will combine the academic study of journalism with the practical elements of an on-campus internship with The Hawk. Students will develop and advance their skills in writing, editing, graphic design, photography and/or the business aspects of newspaper production. This will complement their academic preparation and will help build their portfolio and résumé. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 101 and pre or co-requisite of COM 112, and/or permission of the instructor(s) and Communication program director.

Students will:

  1. Identify and apply news criteria and practice critical thinking and audience adaption in proposing story ideas, creating story assignments with appropriate angle and focus instructions, and developing well-researched and edited stories for publication in The Hawk.
  2. Successfully employ source interviewing strategies in gathering objective and complete information for stories.
  3. Engage in secondary research to provide context to reporting using standard information literacy and research techniques.
  4. Compile and edit stories from research using standard journalistic formats and styles (such as the inverted pyramid, the hourglass feature, Q&A and/or in-depth profiles).
  5. Critique each other's work applying standard editing and proofing techniques to ensure the most accurate publication possible.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of applicable intellectual property laws and respect them in the print and on-line environments.
  7. Participate in weekly production meetings and create editorial timelines and production schedules to achieve a timely monthly distribution.
  8. Identify a particular area of interest in newspaper production (i.e. editorial, photography, graphic design, business management, or advertising sales) and collaborate with the instructor(s) and/or advisor to determine an individualized project for their portfolio.
  9. Research newspaper practices, policies, and procedures at sister community colleges throughout the Massachusetts Higher Education system and beyond to inform a publication plan for Bristol's Hawk.
  10. Learn and apply a consistent style-sheet (likely, the Associate Press style) in editing the publication.

COM 218 : Business Communication

In this course, students develop the communication skills required in business and industry. Students will learn how to define audiences and purpose, to choose the most effective communication tool for various situations, and to develop effective communications to achieve strategic communication goals. This course familiarizes students with the most prevalent forms of written and oral communication used by organizations to communicate with key stakeholders. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Describe the strategic role of communication in the business environment to achieve professional objectives.
  2. Apply critical thinking to evaluate and select appropriate channels/tools to effectively communicate key messages to target audiences.
  3. Create reports and proposal using appropriate tone, focus, and format to achieve the desired impact on the target audience(s).
  4. Produce and deliver an oral presentation adhering to the fundamental theoretical communication concept of a fully developed message with an introduction, body and conclusion.
  5. Develop and implement computer-supported presentation to support or take the place of an in-person oral presentation.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of ethical, legal, and multicultural issues related to communication in the business environment by handling the issues appropriately in written and oral projects.

COM 241 : Public Relations

This course introduces students to the principles and practices of public relations. Students review historical aspects of the discipline and the theoretical foundation that informs the practice. The course helps students identify the skills and expertise that public relations professionals develop in order to be effective for their agency, nonprofit organization, or corporation. The course examines how institutions relate to their various publics and explores traditional public relations functions such as media relations, publications, crisis communication, special events, community relations, and other areas. Course discussion addresses ethical dilemmas, 24/7 deadlines, growing global demands, and the significant effects of new technologies on the profession. This course gives students a foundation for entering careers in public relations. Three class hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Define "public relations".
  2. Explain how basic concepts of communication theory apply to public relations practice.
  3. Describe historical developments that contributed to the evolution of public relations practice and identify key figures who made significant contributions to the field.
  4. Utilize research methods, program planning and evaluation techniques used by public relations professionals.
  5. Examine and discuss ethical and legal issues related to public relation practice.
  6. Summarize key professional standards developed to help guide contemporary practice.
  7. Assess how emerging technologies and globalization are influencing public relations practice.