Humanities

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

HUM 101 : Human Expression Across Time and Space

HUM 101 introduces students to the development of different types of human expression - including art, architecture, literature, theater, music, and philosophy - from around the globe from prehistorical times to the present. Students will also explore motivations for, similarities and differences among, and changes in the different types of human expression. Students will consider how the various types inform one another, shape society, and are shaped by society. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 101 or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

ENG 101 or permission of instructor.

  1. Build and demonstrate vocabulary and concepts relating to the humanities disciplines, including art, architecture, music, theater, philosophy, and literature.
  2. Develop an awareness of the interdisciplinary nature of issues within the humanities.
  3. Recognize how the humanities disciplines respond to and reflect the historical contexts of time, place, environment, technology, Earth, and social condition.
  4. Identify and relate themes of power, oppression, and justice to course materials and society.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a society or culture outside of the United States.
  6. Interpret the humanities using critical thinking and disciplined reasoning in a variety of formats including written and oral communication.
  7. Utilize college centers and resources.

HUM 110 : Introduction to Queer-Feminist Studies

HUM 110 is an introductory survey course providing students an overview of queer-feminist studies through major writers and thinkers within the field. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the course will provide historical background for how western culture created and structured gender and sexuality and contemporary theories which took issue with such structurings and sought to undermine them through deconstruction of gender binaries. Themes include the construction of gender and sexual identity, material oppression based on gender or sexual difference, the state and power in relation to gender equality social movements, the role of queer and feminist theories in a transnational context, and ways of imagining otherwise. In revealing sex and gender as integral axes of analysis in our culture, this course will provide critical skills to assess western culture and act in accordingly ethical ways. In addition to queer theory and feminist theory, other concepts covered could be critical ethnic studies, disability studies, neoliberalism, and migration studies. Readings may include: Passing by Nella Larson, Nightwood by Djuna Barnes, Giovanni’s Room by James Baldwin, The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin and readings by Michel Foucault, Judith Butler, and Audre Lorde.  Three lecture hours per week.  Competencies met: Critical Thinking, Ethical Dimensions, Global and Historic Awareness, Human Expression, Multicultural and Social Perspectives, Oral Communication, Written Communication. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 101

1. Identify and explain the major principles and concepts that form the basis of knowledge in the humanities.
2. Execute ethical reasoning to a variety of situations and human experience.
3. Recognize feminism as a social movement and the social construction of gender.
4. Distinguish the basis of queer theories rise in the 20th century and its main tenets.
5. Create verbal and/or written arguments synthesizing gender, sexuality, and society.

HUM 120 : Practicing Intersectionality in Literature and Film

HUM 120 focuses on intersectionality as a way to understand the unique lived experience of those most marginalized in society. We will begin with Kimberlé Crenshaw’s coining of the term “intersectionality” in 1989 as way to discuss justice for those with identities situated at the intersections of overlapping modes of discrimination and move to study a variety of films and texts that demonstrate the interrelated axes of race, class, gender, sexuality, borderlands, migration, and nationality in visually complex ways. Specific attention is given to images and film, and how they characterize and shape our everyday lives. The course instructs how to recognize, read, and analyze visual media within the social, cultural, and political contexts of cinema. Intersectionality is considered as a praxis, as we bring this theory into the real world through applied readings to visual culture, (social) media, literature, and pop culture. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the College's writing and reading placement tests or a passing grade in ENG 091.  

1.  Identify major theoretical concepts that undergird film.
2.  Describe key historical themes in film studies.
3.  Analyze cinema and visual cultural using critical theory.
4.  Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of U.S. history and society through verbal and/or written expression.
5.  Demonstrate knowledge of a subculture or relationships among subcultures within U.S. society through verbal and/or written expression.
6.  Analyze different literary and cinematic representations of American subcultures and minority groups and articulate valid arguments on these issues.

HUM 150 : Ecoliteracy, Education and Society

This course investigates how educational theory and practice should respond to 21st Century ecological challenges such as climate change, health and food crises, degradation of culture, language and knowledge, as well as the destruction of sustainable indigenous practices and other convivial social relationships under globalization. Through a vigorous survey of contemporary postindustrial society, the course tries to offer practical and theoretical venues for sustainable educational experiences. Students are introduced to multiple educational perspectives to literacy and learning, which address the crucial inter-relationship of all life and all living things, in an effort to foster sustainable and democratic sensibilities of learning, knowledge and society. Competency met: Critical Analysis (1.0); Global Awareness (5.2); Multicultural Perspective (5.3); Social Phenomenon (5.4); Humanities (6.0); Ethical Dimensions (7.0)Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the College's reading and English placement tests or C or better in ENG 091 or ENG 092

  1. Conceptualize and initiate dialogues for democratic educational experiences and practices within social and environmental equity frameworks.
  2. Utilize and integrate a critical pedagogy lens into surveying and analyzing the socio-political origins and historical development of ecoliteracy and ecojustice education.
  3. Demonstrate and describe the connections between culture and nature, while developing a perspective on sustainable and resilient relationships between cultural diversity and biodiversity.
  4. By questioning historical and contemporary discourses of everyday life and social change, evaluate and develop pedagogical approaches and learning practices that can be used in educational (and other social settings) for cultivating sustainability, peace and equity.
  5. Identify and follow local and global environmental issues as they pertain to nature and ecology in order to imagine and develop sustainable alternatives in learning and educational settings.

     

HUM 156 : Fundamentals of Interpreting and Translating

This course presents an in-depth study of the interpreting and translating profession, beginning with the underlying differences between the interpreting and translating process. Students examine various models of the interpreting process for consecutive and simultaneous interpreting as well as the best practices for sight and written translation. The course focuses on both roles of interpreter/translator and the fundamentals of their vocation, including ethical behavior, professional standards, business practices, cross-cultural mediation, settings, audience, and special populations. Students explore the various professional associations and literature available, pertinent laws, opportunities for further study or employment, and/or the procedures and requisites of credentialing. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional support fee applies. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Define translation vs. interpretation.
  2. Explore and discuss ethics (of the interpreter profession) and pertinent laws/regulations.
  3. Explain the role, responsibilities, and business practices of an interpreter/translator.
  4. Identify further training programs and certifications/licenses.
  5. Explain various models of the interpreting process.

HUM 157 : Old Testament

This course examines the major books of the Old Testament from historical, literary, and philosophical perspectives and through a variety of critical lenses. Its influence on literature, film, theater, and global culture will be considered as well as its relevance to the modern secular world. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Human Expression. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

1. Explain the ways in which the text has shaped cultural identities around the world and contributed to systems of oppression.
2. Appraise the philosophical and literary merits of the Old Testament and materials inspired by it.
3. Illustrate how the Old Testament reflects a variety of philosophical perspectives and illuminates the complexities of the human condition.
4. Compose literary analyses of the text using a variety of theoretical perspectives.
5. Distinguish between biblical literary genres.
6. Link the biblical literary genres to the significant time periods in which they were written.

HUM 158 : New Testament

This course examines the major books of the New Testament from historical, literary, and philosophical perspectives and through a variety of critical lenses. Its influence on literature, film, theater, and global culture will be considered as well as its relevance to the modern secular world.  Competency met: Human Expression.  Three lecture hours per week.  Spring 
 

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 101 or permission of instructor.

Corequisites

ENG 101 or permission of instructor.

1. Explain the ways in which the text has shaped cultural identities around the world and contributed to systems of oppression.
2. Appraise the philosophical and literary merits of the text for its contributions to the global literary canon.
3. Explain how the text reflects a variety of philosophical perspectives and illuminates the complexities of the human condition.
4. Compose literary analyses of the text using a variety of theoretical perspectives.
5. Analyze the intended audiences of the major books and contrast the narrative conventions used by their respective authors.

HUM 251 : Topics in Humanities and the Arts

A one-semester course on a specified topic or period in the arts, literature, philosophy, or the humanities. Topics or major themes are announced each semester. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Humanities (6.0) Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

HUM 260 : The Criminal in Contemporary Popular Culture

This interdisciplinary seminar traces the archetype of the criminal across the arts, including literature, film, music, theatre, literary non-fiction, graphic novels, cartoons, architecture, and the fine arts. The way in which socioeconomics, racism, homophobia, and gender discrimination influence the criminal archetype will be considered as will the historical context of the texts assigned. The course will examine the impact that this archetype has made upon popular culture through a variety of critical lenses. Writers and artists are chosen broadly, such as Fyodor Dostoevsky, Ian Fleming, Mario Puzo, Erik Larson, Dr. Dre, and Viet Than Hguyen.   Three lecture hours per week.  Competencies Met: Ethical Dimensions, Human Expression. Spring.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 102 or permission of instructor. 

1. Explain how works of art reflect cultural values that are shaped by personal biases.
2. Interrogate their core beliefs about what constitutes criminal behavior.
3. Analyze the ethical implications of how various forms of discrimination lead to the criminalization of certain populations in the arts.
4. Appraise the aesthetic and literary value of artifacts.
5. Analyze how these artifacts reflect and influence the complex ethical issues surrounding the human condition.
6. Analyze various artifacts using a diversity of critical perspectives.
7. Create interpretations of these artifacts using written and multi-modal responses.

HUM 264 : An Honors Interdisciplinary Seminar on the Holocaust

The Holocaust, or as it has come to be known, the Shoah, is one of the most horrific events in all of world history. Even more than 50 years after the fact, the world continues to struggle with the enormity of this human catastrophe. Nevertheless, a body of writing--both historical and literary--exists that enables us to confront this key moment in world history. This course serves as an introduction to this work. Students gain an understanding of the historical facts, including circumstances leading up to the Holocaust itself and the event's critical aftermath. In addition, students reflect on the role of literature, principally through accounts of that time written by survivors and the children of survivors in the struggle to represent an event that many have described as beyond the limits of language to capture. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Multicultural Perspective (5.3); Humanities (6.0); Ethical Dimensions (7.0) Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ENG 101 and ENG 102. Open to Commonwealth Honors Program students and others with permission of instructor.
  1. Collect relevant historical facts, including circumstances leading up to the Holocaust itself and the event's critical aftermath.
  2. Ascertain the role of literary and of rhetorical genres, including accounts written by survivors and the children of survivors, in the representation of the Holocaust.
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of habits of mind characteristic of the disciplines of history and English (including rhetoric).
  4. Create interdisciplinary connections between the above disciplines.
  5. Articulate an awareness of those connections.

HUM 272 : Exploring Death and Dying in the Humanities

This course examines portrayals of death and dying through literature, philosophy and the arts. Students will examine works from specific historical periods such as ancient Greece, early Christianity, and the Renaissance. Students will evaluate works from both in and outside of the artistic and literary canons as a means of understanding the diverse spectrum of human expression. Competency met: Multicultural Perspective. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

    To explain and compare portrayals of death in at least three specific historical periods. To develop critical thinking skills by close reading and analysis of a variety of texts in a variety of disciplines.To identify and analyze the diverse range of artistic expressions pertaining to death along the strata of mainstream and marginalized voices in society.To apply critical insights gained from these texts to a contemporary understanding of what death means to humanity.To develop the ability through essays, projects and in-class exams to synthesize and discuss in a written form insights gained from reading and lecture.

HUM 291 : Honors Seminar in Postmodern Studies

This interdisciplinary humanities course introduces postmodern theory as it applies to contemporary popular art, architecture, literature, philosophy, music, film, and the Web. Considered as both a reaction to modernism and an extension of American civil rights and counterculture movements, postmodern texts challenge culturally oppressive notions of Absolute Truth through the practice of deconstruction . Students create a final project that may be showcased at a state-wide conference. Practitioners may include The Beatles, Jorges Luis Borges, Caryl Churchill, Don Delillo, Jacques Derrida, Matt Drudge, Philip Glass, Michael Graves, Marshall McLuhan, Camille Paglia, Suzi-Lori Parks, Art Spiegelman, and Andy Warhol. Competency Met: Multicultural Perspective (5.3); Ethical Dimensions (7.0). Three hours of lecture per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Enrollment in the Commonwealth Honors Program or permission of the instructor.
    Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
  1. Become conversant with postmodern discourse: its language, art, theory and thinkers
  2. Distinguish a modern text from that of a postmodern text
  3. Understand how postmodernism was borne out of the civil rights and counter culture movements of the 1960’s
  4. Apply postmodern theory to a variety of texts and genres from popular culture
  5. Demonstrate the ability to deconstruct a “text”
  6. Understand the ethical dimensions of flattening hierarchies
  7. Produce a work of multi-media art/discourse which embodies the tenets of postmodernism

HUM 390 : Fieldwork in Interpreting Portuguese/Spanish

This capstone course provides students with actual field experience in the interpreting/translating field in combination with a one-hour professional development seminar in class. Students spend 90 supervised hours in their pre-approved placements. Students are expected to spend approximately 20 hours shadowing a professional interpreter and 70 hours interpreting/ (sight) translating in a community hospital, medical office, human services agency, legal office, court, or institution. The seminar provides students with a safe environment to analyze and reflect on their experiences, performance and progress as well as to prepare for employment. Fall, Spring; not offered every year.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

For Spanish: ENG 101, HUM 156, SPA 321, SPA 322, SPA 353, SPA 354 with a grade of"C" or better; COM 160 and CRJ 101 or CRJ 113 or MAA 101. For Portuguese: ENG 101, HUM 156, POR 321, POR 322, POR 352, POR 353 with a grade of"C" or better; COM 160 and CRJ 101 or CRJ 113 or MAA 101.
  1. Students will be able to effectively interpret face-to-face encounters in one-on-one situations and small groups of different participants.
  2. Graduates of the program will be prepared to apply the required professional standards, practices, and ethics, to their work.
  3. Students will demonstrate an understanding of multicultural approaches necessary for an effective bi-lingual and bi-cultural practice in their jobs.