Dental Hygiene

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

DHG 111 : Dental Anatomy, Oral Histology and Embryology

This course is a study of the tooth morphology and adjoining structures of the oral cavity. In addition, the classification of different types of occlusion is studied. This course is also a study of embryological and histological processes of the oral cavity. In addition, the microscopic anatomy of the oral cavity is studied. Three lecture hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Open to DHG students only. Required first semester course for the fall semester.

DHG 113 : Orientation to Clinical Dental Hygiene

This course is an introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of all major areas of clinical dental hygiene, including dental hygiene process of care, instrument design and use, primary preventive clinical techniques, medical and dental emergencies, and patient education. Laboratory practice requires working with mannequins and on laboratory session partners. Three lecture hours and six laboratory hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

5

Prerequisites

Open to DHG students only.

Competencies for Dental Hygiene Graduates identify and organize the knowledge, skills, and attitudes our graduates must attain for entry into the dental hygiene practice in public and private settings. Three domains have been identified: Professionalism, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Process of Care.  Within theses three domains, major competencies are identified:

I. Professionalism

  1. Ethics. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discern and manage ethical issues of dental hygiene practice in a rapidly changing environment.
  2. Information Processing. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to acquire and synthesize information in a critical, scientific, and effective manner.
  3. Professional Identity. The new dental hygiene graduate must contribute to improving the knowledge, skills, and values of the profession.

II. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

  1. The Individual. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide planned educational services using appropriate interpersonal communication skills and educational strategies to promote optimal health.
  2. The Community. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to initiate and assume responsibility for health promotion and disease prevention activities for diverse populations.

III. Process of Care

  1. Assessment. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to systematically collect, analyze, and accurately record baseline data on the general, oral, and psychosocial health status of patients using methods consistent with medico-legal principles.
  2. Planning. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discuss the condition of the oral cavity, identify actual and potential problems, etiological and contributing factors, and available treatments.
  3. Implementation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide treatment that includes preventive and therapeutic services designed to achieve and maintain oral health and assist the patient in achieving oral health goals.
  4. Evaluation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to evaluate the effectiveness of planned clinical and educational services and modify as necessary.

DHG 119 : Head and Neck Anatomy

A study of the structures of the human head and neck. The normal anatomy and physiology of the various systems which are present in the head and neck are described in order to enable the students to better recognize abnormal conditions. The study of the head and neck anatomy as it relates to dentistry is stressed. Two lecture hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

2

Prerequisites

Open to DHG students only.

DHG 120 : Dental Hygiene Theory II

This course is a continuation of theoretical and practical aspects of dental hygiene with emphasis on infection control, pain management, ethical situations related to dental hygiene practice, cultural diversity among patients, and evidence-based clinical decision making. Students study patient management, including the child patient, and non-surgical dental hygiene treatment planning, including fluoride therapy. Two lecture hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DHG 122 : Clinical Dental Hygiene II

This course is a clinical practicum in which the student provides direct patient care that incorporates the principles of instrumentation and the dental hygiene process of care. Emphasis is placed on patient assessment, dental hygiene treatment planning, and implementation of care. Nine class hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DHG 124 : Oral Radiography

This course is the study of the nature, physical behavior, biological effects, methods of control, safety precautions, and techniques for exposing, processing, mounting, and evaluating oral radiographs, including clinical practice of radiographic techniques. Laboratory practice includes exposure, evaluation, and interpretation of intraoral and panoramic radiographs. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Corequisites

Competencies for Dental Hygiene Graduates Identifies and organizes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes our graduates must attain for entry into dental hygiene practice in public and private settings. Three domains have been identified: Professionalism, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Patient Care. Within these three domains, major competencies are identified. 

I. Professionalism

  1. Ethics. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discern and manage ethical issues of dental hygiene practice in a rapidly changing environment.
  2. Information Processing. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to acquire and synthesize information in a critical, scientific, and effective manner.
  3. Professional Identity. The new dental hygiene graduate must contribute to improving the knowledge, skills, and values of the profession.

II. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

  1. The Individual. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide planned educational services using appropriate interpersonal communication skills and educational strategies to promote optimal health.

  2. The Community. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to initiate and assume responsibility for health promotion and disease prevention activities for diverse populations.

III. Process of Care

  1. Assessment. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to systematically collect, analyze, and accurately record baseline data on the general, oral, and psychosocial health status of patients using methods consistent with medico-legal principles.

  2. Planning. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discuss the condition of the oral cavity, identify actual and potential problems, etiological and contributing factors, and available treatments.
  3. Implementation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide treatment that includes preventive and therapeutic services designed to achieve and maintain oral health and assist the patient in achieving oral health goals.
  4. Evaluation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to evaluate the effectiveness of planned clinical and educational services and modify as necessary.

DHG 126 : Periodontology

This course is a study of the pathology of periodontal disease and the philosophy of periodontal treatments, including both surgical and non-surgical therapy procedures. The course focuses on the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, methods of assessment, diagnosis, and classification of periodontal disease. The course emphasizes the relationship between periodontal health and systemic health and risk factors. Three lecture hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Open to DHG students only.

DHG 128 : Pharmacology for Dental Hygienists

A study of drugs to familiarize the student with their origin, physical and chemical properties, dosage and therapeutic effects. Special consideration is given to those drugs affecting dental or dental hygiene procedures. One lecture hour per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

1

Prerequisites

Open to DHG students only.

DHG 230 : Local Anesthesia for the Dental Hygienist

This course is a study of the theory of pain management in dental hygiene and dentistry. Topics include general anesthesia, local anesthesia, nitrous oxide-oxygen sedation and topical anesthesia. The course includes a review of head and neck anatomy; neurophysiology; anesthetic pharmacology; management of local and systemic anesthetic complications; evaluation of the patient; mandibular and maxillary local anesthesia techniques; and infection control and exposure control protocols. Laboratory exercises are designed to provide students the opportunity to administer mandibular and maxillary injection techniques. The laboratory hours are completed during the first half of the fall semester. One lecture hour and two laboratory hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DHG 119, DHG 128 and sophomore standing.

Competencies for Dental Hygiene Graduates Identifies and organizes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes our graduates must attain for entry into dental hygiene practice in public and private settings. Three domains have been identified: Professionalism, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Patient Care. Within these three domains, major competencies are identified. 

I. Professionalism

  1. Ethics. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discern and manage ethical issues of dental hygiene practice in a rapidly changing environment.
  2. Information Processing. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to acquire and synthesize information in a critical, scientific, and effective manner.
  3. Professional Identity. The new dental hygiene graduate must contribute to improving the knowledge, skills, and values of the profession.

II. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

  1. The Individual. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide planned educational services using appropriate interpersonal communication skills and educational strategies to promote optimal health.
  2. The Community. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to initiate and assume responsibility for health promotion and disease prevention activities for diverse populations.

III. Process of Care

  1. Assessment. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to systematically collect, analyze, and accurately record baseline data on the general, oral, and psychosocial health status of patients using methods consistent with medico-legal principles.
  2. Planning. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discuss the condition of the oral cavity, identify actual and potential problems, etiological and contributing factors, and available treatments.
  3. Implementation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide treatment that includes preventive and therapeutic services designed to achieve and maintain oral health and assist the patient in achieving oral health goals.
  4. Evaluation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to evaluate the effectiveness of planned clinical and educational services and modify as necessary.

DHG 231 : Dental Hygiene Theory III

This course is a continuation of the theoretical aspects of dental hygiene clinical practice. Special patient populations and topics are discussed and integrated to provide critical examination of the dental hygiene process of care related to patient assessment, dental hygiene diagnosis, dental hygiene treatment plan, implementation and evaluation of treatment to provide comprehensive dental hygiene care. Two lecture hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DHG 120 and sophomore standing.

Competencies for Dental Hygiene Graduates identifies and organizes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes our graduates must attain for entry into dental hygiene practice in public and private settings. Three domains have been identified: Professionalism, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Patient Care. Within these three domains, major competencies are identified.

I. Professionalism

  1. Ethics. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discern and manage ethical issues of dental hygiene practice in a rapidly changing environment.
  2. Information Processing. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to acquire and synthesize information in a critical, scientific, and effective manner.
  3. Professional Identity. The new dental hygiene graduate must contribute to improving the knowledge, skills, and values of the profession.

II. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

  1. The Individual. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide planned educational services using appropriate interpersonal communication skills and educational strategies to promote optimal health.
  2. The Community. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to initiate and assume responsibility for health promotion and disease prevention activities for diverse populations.

III. Process of Care

  1. Assessment. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to systematically collect, analyze, and accurately record baseline data on the general, oral, and psychosocial health status of patients using methods consistent with medico-legal principles.
  2. Planning. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discuss the condition of the oral cavity, identify actual and potential problems, etiological and contributing factors, and available treatments.
  3. Implementation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide treatment that includes preventive and therapeutic services designed to achieve and maintain oral health and assist the patient in achieving oral health goals.
  4. Evaluation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to evaluate the effectiveness of planned clinical and educational services and modify as necessary.

DHG 233 : Clinical Dental Hygiene III

This course is a clinical practicum in which students have an increased number of patient experiences that provide additional experience in the performance of a more complex dental hygiene process of care. Also, on service-learning rotations, students gain additional clinical experience at extramural sites providing care for patients with special needs. Fourteen laboratory hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

DHG 122 and sophomore standing.

  1. Demonstrate a refinement of clinical dental hygiene skills from the previous two semesters.
  2. Provide dental hygiene care as authorized in the prepared treatment plans of approximately 40 patients, including the following services: a. Medical dental history dialogue and record information, b. Intraoral and extra-oral examination and record, c. Dental charting, d. Periodontal charting, e. Mucogingival charting
  3. Patient education individualized to patient's needs including dental biofilm control and dietary analysis.  
  4. Periodontal debridement using hand instruments and ultrasonic scalers for selective polishing for patients with slight to heavy stains.
  5. Application of desensitizing agents.
  6. Application of a topical fluoride agent.
  7. Complete follow-up procedures regarding recall appointments and necessary referral for additional care.
  8. Maintain sharp hand instruments without damage to the cutting edge or changing the contour of the instrument.
  9. Describe and demonstrate the recording of dental, periodontal and mucogingival charting.
  10. Demonstrate and record tooth mobility.
  11. Demonstrate application of radiography skills learned in DHG 12
  12. Demonstrate organizational skills and time management.
  13. Demonstrate patient management skills related to exposing radiographs.
  14. Correctly expose, process, mount and assess radiographs.
  15. Demonstrate duplication of radiographs.
  16. Explain the rationale and demonstrate the procedures for sealant treatment.
  17. Identify various oral signs and symptoms that may indicate the presence of detrimental oral habits and explain their anatomical, physiological, and possible psychological effects.
  18. Describe and demonstrate the technique for taking alginate impressions.
  19. Describe and demonstrate the technique for fabrication of study casts.
  20. Demonstrate understanding of digital intraoral photography.
  21. Demonstrate use of computerized intraoral photography and print photograph of case study presentation.
  22. Participate in service learning experience by providing dental hygiene care to patients in a variety of community practice settings.
  23. Demonstrate the preparation, administration to patient and disassembly of a local anesthetic syringe.
  24. Demonstrate the application of radiography skills learned in DHG 12
  25. Demonstrate organizational skills and time management.
  26. Demonstrate patient management skills related to exposing radiographs.
  27. Correctly expose, process, mount and assess radiographs.
  28. Demonstrate duplication of radiographs.
  29. Correctly maintain infection control protocols.

DHG 235 : General and Oral Pathology

A study of the diseases of the human body, especially those of concern to the dentist and dental hygienist. Pathological conditions of the oral cavity are examined in detail, emphasizing the comparison of normal and abnormal conditions. Two lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

2

Prerequisites

Open to DHG students only.

DHG 237 : Dental Materials

This course is a study of the science of dental materials, including physical, chemical, and biological properties, and the manipulation and care of materials used in the prevention and treatment of oral disease. The laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate the properties, applications, and uses of selected materials presented in lecture with special emphasis on the materials used within the scope of dental hygiene practice. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Open to DHG students only.

Competencies for Dental Hygiene Graduates Identifies and organizes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes our graduates must attain for entry into dental hygiene practice in public and private settings. Three domains have been identified: Professionalism, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Patient Care. Within these three domains, major competencies are identified.

I. Professionalism

  1. Ethics. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discern and manage ethical issues of dental hygiene practice in a rapidly changing environment.
  2. Information Processing. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to acquire and synthesize information in a critical, scientific, and effective manner.
  3. Professional Identity. The new dental hygiene graduate must contribute to improving the knowledge, skills, and values of the profession.

II. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

  1. The Individual. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide planned educational services using appropriate interpersonal communication skills and educational strategies to promote optimal health.
  2. The Community. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to initiate and assume responsibility for health promotion and disease prevention activities for diverse populations.

III. Process of Care

  1. Assessment. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to systematically collect, analyze, and accurately record baseline data on the general, oral, and psychosocial health status of patients using methods consistent with medico-legal principles.
  2. Planning. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discuss the condition of the oral cavity, identify actual and potential problems, etiological and contributing factors, and available treatments.
  3. Implementation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide treatment that includes preventive and therapeutic services designed to achieve and maintain oral health and assist the patient in achieving oral health goals.
  4. Evaluation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to evaluate the effectiveness of planned clinical and educational services and modify as necessary.

DHG 240 : Dental Hygiene Theory IV

This course is a continuation of the theoretical aspects of dental hygiene practice. The study of patients with special needs continues. Domestic violence and child abuse are studied. Emphasis is placed on the law, current state regulations, and ethical dimensions of dental hygiene practice. The dental hygienist's legal responsibilities in all these areas are emphasized. The course prepares students for employment and the attainment of professional goals. Two lecture hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

2

Prerequisites

DHG 231 and second semester sophomore standing.

Competencies for Dental Hygiene Graduates Identifies and organizes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes our graduates must attain for entry into dental hygiene practice in public and private settings. Three domains have been identified: Professionalism, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Patient Care. Within these three domains, major competencies are identified.

I. Professionalism

  1. Ethics. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discern and manage ethical issues of dental hygiene practice in a rapidly changing environment.
  2. Information Processing. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to acquire and synthesize information in a critical, scientific, and effective manner.
  3. Professional Identity. The new dental hygiene graduate must contribute to improving the knowledge, skills, and values of the profession.

II. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

  1. The Individual. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide planned educational services using appropriate interpersonal communication skills and educational strategies to promote optimal health.
  2. The Community. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to initiate and assume responsibility for health promotion and disease prevention activities for diverse populations.

III. Process of Care

  1. Assessment. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to systematically collect, analyze, and accurately record baseline data on the general, oral, and psychosocial health status of patients using methods consistent with medico-legal principles.
  2. Planning. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discuss the condition of the oral cavity, identify actual and potential problems, etiological and contributing factors, and available treatments.
  3. Implementation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide treatment that includes preventive and therapeutic services designed to achieve and maintain oral health and assist the patient in achieving oral health goals.
  4. Evaluation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to evaluate the effectiveness of planned clinical and educational services.

DHG 242 : Clinical Dental Hygiene IV

This course is a clinical practicum that provides the opportunity for further development of the clinical practice of dental hygiene in preparation for licensure. The focus is on the development of advanced clinical dental hygiene practice where students apply integrated, multi-disciplinary learning and a higher order of critical thinking to ensure the delivery of optimal patient care. In addition, through service-learning rotations, students gain additional clinical experience in the delivery of care for patients with special needs. Twelve to fourteen hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

DHG 233 and second semester sophomore standing.

DHG 244 : Oral Health in the Community

This course presents the methodology by which the dental hygienist plans programs to promote oral health in the community. While learning the principles of program planning, the student conducts a needs assessment and designs oral health programs. Programs are presented and evaluated in service-learning experiences in which students provide oral health education to various populations within the community. Two lecture hours per week. Spring; Day only

Credits

2

Prerequisites

Open to DHG students only.
    The Student will demonstrate his/her ability to evaluate published articles by writing critiques of one article concerning dentistry or public health from periodicals found in the library, using the outline provided. The article must be related to the target group of the student’s project.