DHG 240 : Dental Hygiene Theory IV

This course is a continuation of the theoretical aspects of dental hygiene practice. The study of patients with special needs continues. Domestic violence and child abuse are studied. Emphasis is placed on the law, current state regulations, and ethical dimensions of dental hygiene practice. The dental hygienist's legal responsibilities in all these areas are emphasized. The course prepares students for employment and the attainment of professional goals. Two lecture hours per week. Spring; Day only

Prerequisites

DHG 231 and second semester sophomore standing.

Competencies for Dental Hygiene Graduates Identifies and organizes the knowledge, skills, and attitudes our graduates must attain for entry into dental hygiene practice in public and private settings. Three domains have been identified: Professionalism, Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, and Patient Care. Within these three domains, major competencies are identified.

I. Professionalism

  1. Ethics. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discern and manage ethical issues of dental hygiene practice in a rapidly changing environment.
  2. Information Processing. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to acquire and synthesize information in a critical, scientific, and effective manner.
  3. Professional Identity. The new dental hygiene graduate must contribute to improving the knowledge, skills, and values of the profession.

II. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

  1. The Individual. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide planned educational services using appropriate interpersonal communication skills and educational strategies to promote optimal health.
  2. The Community. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to initiate and assume responsibility for health promotion and disease prevention activities for diverse populations.

III. Process of Care

  1. Assessment. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to systematically collect, analyze, and accurately record baseline data on the general, oral, and psychosocial health status of patients using methods consistent with medico-legal principles.
  2. Planning. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to discuss the condition of the oral cavity, identify actual and potential problems, etiological and contributing factors, and available treatments.
  3. Implementation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to provide treatment that includes preventive and therapeutic services designed to achieve and maintain oral health and assist the patient in achieving oral health goals.
  4. Evaluation. The new dental hygiene graduate must be able to evaluate the effectiveness of planned clinical and educational services.

Overview

Subject

Credits

2
Instructional support fee applies.

Degrees/Certificates That Require Course