Early Childhood Education

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

ECE 110 : Early Childhood Growth and Development

This course introduces the student to child growth and development in the areas of cognitive, physical, linguistic, social, and emotional development from pre-natal stages through adolescence. Leading theorists on child growth and development, such as Piaget, Erickson, Vygotsky, Ainsworth, and others will be examined. Exploration of cultural and societal influences on development, as well as discussion of individual differences will be explored. The course will also include an introduction to developmentally appropriate practice, learning activities, environments that support development and ethical decision-making when working with children and their families. This course requires 15 hours in web-available infant, toddler, preschool, and school-age classroom observations.

Credits

3

Corequisites

  1. Describe children’s physical, cognitive, linguistic, social, and emotional development from prenatal through adolescence.
  2. Analyze ethics, research, and theories in child development.
  3. Identify typical and atypical child development.
  4. Connect the importance of child observations and assessments in planning for the individual child.
  5. Explain the impact of cultural, ethnic, and socioeconomic factors influencing child development.

ECE 111 : Introduction to Early Childhood Education

This course will introduce the student to the field of early care and education from a philosophical, historical, socioeconomic, and multicultural point of view. Major theories and models of significant early childhood programs will be examined such as Head Start, Froebel's Kindergarten, Montessori, Reggio-Emilia, and the High Scope Approach. The role of the early care educator, professionalism, and managing successfully in the workplace in accordance with the National Association for the Education of Young Children’s (NAEYC) code of ethical conduct will be explored. The course will include required field observations of eight hours across the full age span (0 -8) in diverse settings as determined by DEEC. Three lecture hours per week. Competencies met: Multicultural and Social Perspectives, Ethical Dimensions.  Three lecture hours per week.  Fall

Credits

3

1. Identify principles of underlying different early childhood approaches.
2. Analyze the social, cultural, and historical context of early childhood education.
3. Describe the links between theorists, such as Piaget and Vygotsky, on current early childhood education practice.
4. Identify current trends and issues in the early childhood field related to children and families of diverse communities.
5. Explain examples of integrated early childhood education theory in classroom practice.
 

ECE 112 : Observing, Recording, and Analyzing Early Childhood Settings

Observations and classroom presentations/discussions provide students the opportunity to learn, know, and apply a variety of recording techniques, such as narratives (e.g., anecdotal, running record, and journal), time sampling, event sampling, checklists, and rating scales. Discussions focus on the classroom as a learning community, including the teacher as a learner and leader through reflective practice. Analysis of observations takes into account observer assumptions and theories of child and adult development. Assessment is determined by the quality of in-progress records, discussions, and a final assignment. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Critical Thinking, Written Communication. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Corequisites

1. Explain the various child observation techniques.
2. Write detailed objective descriptions of children’s behaviors.
3. Interpret children’s behavior based on developmental theory.
4. Identify assumptions from opinions/beliefs and focus on actuals.
5. Assess through formative and summative reflections on her/his engagement in class, content matter, and observing recording analyzing skills.

ECE 113 : Safe and Healthy Early Childhood Learning Environments

The course promotes an understanding of health and safety factors in both the physical and social-emotional areas. Topics such as sanitation, infectious disease control, food preparation, classroom safety, and the safety of the facility itself form part of the physical aspect. Topics related to the emotional well-being and protection of children from abuse, neglect, isolation, and biases make up the social-emotional area. Students have the opportunity to observe, record, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of a learning environment in relation to how it meets the needs of the children and families served by that particular community. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring.

Credits

3
  1. Demonstrate the interrelationship between health, safety, and nutrition through the lens of socioeconomic status, culture, and neighborhoods.
  2. Generate ideas and strategies promoting positive social and emotional well-being.
  3. Identify characteristics of safe quality environments including physical environment and policies.
  4. Identify nutritional concepts that are appropriate for the young child and be able to explain the basic concepts of food and nutrients to children.

ECE 125 : Social Emotional Development of School-Age Child

This course explores the many facets and contexts of the school age (5-12 years) child's developmental process. Special attention is given to the social and emotional dimensions, including theories of friendship, Stanley Greenspan's stages of emotional development, self esteem, competition, and peer relationships. Three lecture hours per week. Spring, Summer

Credits

3
  1. Describe key characteristics and developmental milestones of the school-age child.
  2. Examine and apply the theories of friendship to understand the social-emotional relatedness of child growth and development.
  3. Analyze the impact of social-cultural factors and educational system on the child.

ECE 221 : Guiding Young Children

Practical approaches to guiding young children's behavior are based on a philosophy of problem-solving that emphasizes children's abilities and needs.  Proactive techniques such as active listening, negotiation, I-messages, and similar limit-setting methods help children to accept responsibility and build their communication capacity. Solutions to conflicts in early childhood settings take a child-centered anti-bias approach based on building trust and respect for each child and his/her family's cultural background.  Three lecture hours per week.  Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

1.  Identify examples of indirect and direct guidance based on field visit experience.
2.  Contrast the differences between guidance and punishment in the context of self-concept.
3.  Identify signs of emotional distress, abuse, and neglect in children.
4.  Identify the reciprocal relationship between the self-esteem and behavior of the child in relation to the family, school, and society.
5.  Apply a prevention-based approach to guiding young children’s behavior aimed at promoting prosocial development.
 

ECE 222 : Special Needs in Early Childhood

This course focuses on student understanding of the diverse abilities and disabilities of children from birth through eight years of age. Implications of IDEA, use and preparation of Individualized Education Plan (I.E.P.) and the Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP) is threaded through class discussion, assignments, and adaptations and procedures for children with special needs. Students identify the role of teacher in relation to parents of children with special needs in an all-inclusive classroom. The objectives of this course meets Department of Early Education and Childcare (DEEC) guidelines for certification as lead teacher. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

1.  Describe the guiding principles of the inclusionary approach.
2.  Identify signs of early developmental delays.
3.  Design differentiated instruction practice based on IFSP and IEP forms.
4.  Create curriculum using the integration of principles and practice of inclusion.

ECE 223 : Infant-Toddler Development

After a quick review of prenatal development, the course addresses the developmental stages of infants and toddlers (birth through three years) within the context of their family. It explores different areas of development--including emotional, physical, cognitive, social, language, literacy, and behavioral--in the context of relationships. The course discusses infant-toddler care-giving principles and the day-to-day practices as reflected in different families of similar and diverse cultural backgrounds. It emphasizes the characteristics of responsive care giving and high-quality early care and education and the significant relationship between emotional development and thinking. Students learn Greenspan's theory of emotional development and Floortime. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Describe and identify indicators of infant/toddler developmental milestones.
  2. Identify responsive caregiving in the context of developmental theories including Greenspan, Bronfenbrenner, and Erickson.
  3. Analyze dialogue that promotes healthy social-emotional development.
  4. Examine the influence of cultural practices of infant/toddler development.

ECE 224 : Infant and Toddler Curriculum Development

After a quick review of prenatal development, the course addresses the developmental stages of infants and toddlers (birth through three years) within the context of their family. It explores different areas of development--including emotional, physical, cognitive, social, language, literacy, and behavioral--in the context of relationships. Students apply knowledge of infant-toddler development in developing and implementing a responsive curriculum that supports the holistic development of the infant-toddler and is inclusive and culturally reflective of diverse cultural backgrounds. Emphasis is placed on characteristics of high-quality early care and education and the significant relationship between emotional development and thinking. Students explore and create routine and play based activities that allows the infant-toddler to engage actively and discover the world around her/him.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

ECE 110 Early Childhood Growth and Development or PSY 252 Child Development.

1. Analyze the interrelationship between caregiving routines in infant/toddler curriculum within the context of developmental theories.
2. Explain the influence of cultural practices on infant/toddler development.
3. Design curriculum activities that are culturally relevant and responsive to the diverse needs of infants/toddlers.
4. Demonstrate through planned routine and play-based activities the progression of and interrelationship between and among the developmental domains.
5. Apply cognitive-developmental theories in creating infant/toddler emergent curriculum.
6. Assess the learning environment using ITERS.

ECE 232 : Language Arts Across Preschool

Understanding the theoretical foundations and central role of language arts during the preschool years forms the core of instruction. Language arts include listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking. Communication of ideas and information through the language arts adheres to rules that govern the English language, such as phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. Students learn strategies to address the diverse needs of young language learners in inclusive settings, to work with parents and families, and to collaborate with professionals in other fields. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Identify current research and theories of early literacy development.
  2. Identify the competency of a literacy-rich environment.
  3. Demonstrate the interrelationship between listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
  4. Formulate plans as strategies to address the needs of English language learners.
  5. Demonstrate synthesis of language arts using childrens books.

ECE 234 : Preschool Curriculum Planning

Through a balanced and integrated approach based on multicultural education, students plan activities related to three- and four-year olds' need to self-discover the world around them. Activity plans include adaptations for inclusion of special-needs children with special attention to individualized education plans (IEPs), strategies for assessment of children's learning, and evaluation of planned activities. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Examine the daily schedule and observe its relationship to preschool curriculum.
  2. Plan a preschool curriculum utilizing Piagetian and Vygotskian theory as a guide.
  3. Design play-based interactive activities for the different learning centers.
  4. Create an integrated thematic unit plan.

ECE 236 : Infant-Toddler Curriculum Planning

In this experiential course, students have the opportunity to explore and create activities that allow the infant-toddler to engage actively and discover the world around her/him. Students apply knowledge of infant-toddler development in developing and assessing a curriculum that supports all-around individual development of the infant-toddler. The course encourages the acquisition of skills to document appropriately, display, and describe children's work, and involve parents. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Analyze and synthesize the interrelationship between caregiving routines in infant/toddler curriculum.
  2. Demonstrate through planned activities the interrelationship between and among the developmental domains.
  3. Assess the learning environment using ITERS.
  4. Apply cognitive developmental theories in creating infant/toddler emergent curriculum.

ECE 238 : School Age Child Care Curriculum Planning

This course centers on creative curriculum planning for children of school age (5-12 years). Curriculum planning is based on observations of children's needs and knowledge of child development. Using the framework of friendships and emotional milestones, students' curriculum plans include crafts, hobbies, music, sports, games, theater, art, and other similar activities. Students develop a curriculum resource file/binder. In addition, students explore strategies for building partnerships with families of the children in the program. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Plan an after-school inclusive program curriculum.
  2. Design play-based interactive, indoor and outdoor activities with a defined developmental domain focus.
  3. Identify strategies promoting acceptance of all children.

ECE 244 : Parent-Teacher Communication Partnerships

Students develop knowledge and skills in understanding and building partnerships with parents based on the recognition that families have diverse styles of parenting. Building increased awareness and sensitivity to ethnic, racial, class, abilities, and linguistic issues is key to the affirmation of differences. Students study contemporary models and practices that support the involvement of parents in their child's education. Students learn to use appropriate oral and written communications, discover parents' priorities, and design activities and structures for ongoing collaborations with parents. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Develop written forms of parent communication.
  2. Self-evaluate oral communication skills using defined criteria.
  3. Examine families and appreciate differences from the perspectives of ethnicity, race, socioeconomic status, abilities, and linguistic background.
  4. Identify strategies for initiating and enhancing parent-teacher relationships.

ECE 245 : CDA Portfolio

This course introduces students to the CDA (Child Development Associate Credential) competency standards designated by the Council for Professional Recognition. Students enhance their knowledge of developmentally appropriate practices and curriculum for children birth through age eight. Specific focus includes the six competency goals and thirteen functional areas of the CDA. Emphasis is placed on applying for the CDA and preparing students for the CDA Professional Portfolio, passing the CDA exam and preparation for a PD Specialist visit.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Corequisites

ECE work verification from current employer and any verification needed showing up to a minimum of one year at 20 hours a week in an Infant, Toddler, Preschool or Family Child Care setting.

Apply for and be equipped to acquire the Child Development Associate Credential successfully.

  1. Identify, establish and maintain a safe and healthy learning environment in an Early Education and Care setting.
  2. Apply developmentally appropriate and responsive strategies in and ECE classroom environment.
  3. Support age appropriate social and emotional development to provide positive guidance.
  4. Utilize family engagement strategies to maintain a positive and productive relationships with families.
  5. Implement continual professional development and practice the Review Observe and Reflect model utilizing the completed CDA Portfolio

ECE 251 : Teaching Practicum I and Seminar I

Students select to work with either infants and toddlers or preschool children in inclusive settings that are approved by the Department of Early Education and Childcare (DEEC). The group day care services are staffed by a Lead Teacher. During this period, the student demonstrates his/her ability to work as a team member and to develop, implement and evaluate developmentally appropriate activities for small groups of infants/toddlers or preschool children. Students develop important qualities and skills, including the ability to initiate and expand responsive communications with children and to interact in ways that help develop mutuality and trust. The accompanying seminar provides a forum for students to share reflections, raise questions, and extend their understanding of the teacher's responsibility. This student-internship is supervised by college faculty.

Note: C.O.R.I., S.O.R.I., and Health Requirements must be met and students must meet with the Program Coordinator the semester prior to enrollment in ECE 251. Required: 150 hours of field experience per semester, orientation, and seven two-hour seminars per semester on alternating weeks. Please note different requirements for different early education settings. Fall, Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Infant-Toddler setting: ECE 113 and ECE 224, or ECE 113ECE 223, and ECE 236.

Preschool setting: ECE 113ECE 222 and ECE 234.

Corequisites

Infant-Toddler setting: ECE 113 and ECE 224, or ECE 113ECE 223, and ECE 236.

Preschool setting: ECE 113ECE 222 and ECE 234.

  1. Apply knowledge of developmental theory into teaching practice.
  2. Design learning activities in the context of developmental appropriateness and cultural relevance.
  3. Plan curriculum to meet individual needs and abilities of all learners.
  4. Evaluate the classroom as a learning environment for all children and recommended changes to make the classroom a high-quality learning environment.
  5. Operate the classroom with assistance following the procedures, policies, and practices as outlined by state regulations.
  6. Assess individual teaching practice, set-up of the physical environment, and curriculum implementation.

ECE 252 : Teaching Practicum II and Seminar II-Preschool Setting

Students continue to build upon, consolidate, and expand professional competencies acquired in ECE 251. As they take on a leading role, student-teachers participate in staff meetings; support students with diverse learning needs, and develop, prepare, and organize activities around a theme. Student-teachers are expected to demonstrate their ability to provide positive guidance to children, to take on responsibility for the physical setup of the classroom, and to implement successfully a developmentally and culturally appropriate integrated curriculum. The 150-hour field experience is complemented by an on-going seminar that focuses on drawing the connections between child developmental theory and teaching practice. The sites selected are DEEC approved facilities, and the supervising teacher-practitioner is lead-teacher certified. Students are encouraged and supported to develop an initial understanding/knowledge of their evolving professional self/role through reflective practice. Note: C.O.R.I., S.O.R.I., and Health Requirements must be met and students must meet with the Program Coordinator the semester prior to enrollment in ECE 252. 150 hours of field experience, orientation, and seven two-hour seminars per semester on alternating weeks.  Fall, Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

   ECE 234 and ECE 251 with a grade of C- or better.

Corequisites

1.  Apply developmentally appropriate strategies to instruction and interaction with children.
2.  Create individualized instruction plans that affirm diversity, inclusion, and fairness.
3.  Analyze her/his own assumptions and impact on teaching practice.
4.  Operate the classroom following the procedures, policies, and practices as outlined by state regulations.
5.  Evaluate learning experiences in the context of the Department of Early Education and Care’s core competencies.

 

ECE 253 : Teaching Practicum II and Seminar II-Infant-Toddler Setting

Students continue to build upon, consolidate, and expand professional competencies acquired in ECE 251. As they take on a leading role, student-teachers participate in staff meetings; support students with diverse learning needs, and develop, prepare, and organize activities around a theme. Student-teachers are expected to demonstrate their ability to provide positive guidance to children, to take on responsibility for the physical set up of the classroom, and to implement successfully a developmentally and culturally appropriate integrated curriculum. The 150-hour field experience is complemented by an on-going seminar that focuses on drawing the connections between child developmental theory and teaching practice. The sites selected are DEEC approved facilities, and the supervising teacher-practitioner is lead-teacher certified. Students are encouraged and supported to develop an initial understanding/knowledge of their evolving professional self/role through reflective practice. Note: C.O.R.I., S.O.R.I., and Health Requirements must be met and students must meet with the Program Coordinator the semester prior to enrollment in ECE 253. 150 hours of field experience, orientation, and seven two-hour seminars per semester on alternating weeks. Fall, Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

ECE 251 with a grade of C- or better, ECE 112, and ECE 222.

Corequisites

 ECE 224, or ECE 223 and ECE 236, and ECE 221 or ECE 244.

  1.  Apply developmentally appropriate strategies to instruction and interaction with children.
  2. Create individualized instruction plans that affirm diversity, inclusion, and fairness.
  3. Analyze her/his own assumptions and impact on teaching practice.
  4.  Operate the classroom following the procedures, policies, and practices as outlined by state regulations.
  5. Evaluate learning experiences in the context of the Department of Early Education and Care’s core competencies. 

ECE 255 : Teaching Practicum II and Seminar II: School-Age Child Care Setting

This course combines the on-site learning experiences in school-age child care settings with a weekly two-hour on-campus seminar. The student must complete a minimum of 150 practicum hours and participate in seminar meetings. The teaching practicum experience requires students to record and interpret observations, maintain journals, plan activities, write reflective papers, and demonstrate an increasing ability to link classroom theory to working with children. 150 hours of field experience and seven two-hour seminars per semester on alternating weeks. Fall, Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. Effectively instruct and engage, appropriately demonstrating child development and learning.
  2. Incorporate teaching learning strategies that affirm diversity, inclusion, and fairness.
  3. Demonstrate competence to meet individual needs and abilities of all learners.
  4. Discern her/his own assumptions and impact on teaching practice.
  5. Lead, manage, and be responsible for program planning and parent communications, and classroom management.
  6. Synthesize and reflect on learning experiences in the context of the Department of Early Education and Care core competencies.

ECE 260 : Play and Early Childhood Curriculum Planning

Students examine the critical role of play in the young child's social, emotional, and cognitive development with particular reference to the theories of Piaget, Vygotsky, Greenspan and Ruben. Students actively engage with preschool children for a minimum of 8 hours in practicing the Dialogic Reading Approach. Preschool curriculum planning is based on MA Curriculum Frameworks and is reflective of anti-bias curriculum principles. Attention is paid to differentiated instruction to meet the needs of children with different abilities, special needs including the gifted and talented. Tools for assessment of learning are introduced. Using the inclusionary-integrated approach, curriculum planning lays emphasis on emerging literacy and numeracy skills. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ECE 111, ECE 112, and ECE 110 or PSY 252, all with a grade of C or better.

  1. Assess the role of developmental play from a variety of theoretical perspectives in children pre-k through grade 3. 
  2. Research current theory and research practices of play.
  3. Evaluate educational materials and curriculum using the anti-bias curriculum criteria.
  4. Identify strategies promoting parent-teacher relationships.
  5. Plan preschool activities based on MA curriculum frameworks.
  6. Design a curriculum plan integrating early learning language arts, math, and science concepts.

ECE 261 : Early Childhood Licensure Teaching Practicum

Early Childhood licensure teaching practicum is a capstone experience. The field placement may be in kindergarten or pre-kindergarten for 150 hours
followed by 25 hours in grades 1 or 2 classroom in an elementary school setting selected by the Program Coordinator. Students’ participation evolves from observation to demonstration of competencies (identified by DEEC) to be in-charge of a Pre-K or K.G. classroom. Observations and reflections are an integral part of curriculum implementation and teaching practice. Seminars focus on integrating theory and practice of child development, curriculum planning, individualized instruction, special needs, anti-bias curriculum, and on-going reflective assessment of self and children's learning. Note: CORI, SORI, Fingerprinting and Health Requirements must be met, and students must meet with the Program Coordinator the semester prior to enrollment in ECE 261. Restricted to Early Childhood Education Early Childhood Licensure Transfer option students. Orientation is held the first week of classes.  Seminar meets for two hours on alternate weeks for seven weeks. Spring.

Credits

5

Prerequisites

ECE 260 and ECE 222 with a grade of C or better; GPA 2.75.

1.  Apply developmentally appropriate strategies to the creation, instruction, and implementation of activities and interactions with children in a classroom setting.
2.  Operate the classroom following the procedures, policies, and practices as outlined by state regulations.
3.  Practice accepted code of ethics and professionalism of educators.
4.  Evaluate learning experiences in the context of the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education standards for educator preparation.

ECE 291 : Day Care Administration

This course is designed to promote an understanding of the administrative organization and regulatory issues related to child care centers. The course investigates the role of the administrator as facilitator, mediator, and resource person in promoting a safe and positive early childhood environment. The objectives of this course meet the Department of Early Education and Child Care (EEC) Director I guidelines. Three lecture hours per week.  Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ECE 251 or permission of program director.

1. Identify the multifaceted role of a director.
2. Apply the DEEC regulations in the operation of a child care center.
3. Apply recognized state and national quality rating standards to determine the quality of program.
4. Demonstrate appropriate communication skills with children, staff, parents, and the community.

ECE 292 : Supervision and Personnel Management in Early Childhood

This course focuses on basic supervision and leadership styles. Supervisors of early educators learn how to promote professional development and mentor diverse staff through ongoing reflective supervision. It emphasizes techniques in staff development analysis and the enhancement of interpersonal communications, organization, supervisory styles, as well as, within the context of parents and the community. This course meets Department of Early Education and Childcare (DEEC) standards for Director II Certification in Early Childhood programs. Three lecture hours per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

ECE 252 or ECE 253 or permission of program coordinator.

Corequisites

ECE 252 or ECE 253 or permission of program coordinator.

1. Apply information from early childhood education regulations and policies to inform decisions on hiring, supervising, and evaluating educators.
2. Create developmentally and culturally appropriate early childhood professional development trainings.
3. Identify community resources for purposes of staff support and professional development.
4. Evaluate an educator’s performance and make recommendations for improvement and/or professional development.
5. Demonstrate the skills necessary to effectively communicate with children, staff, parents, and the community.