Criminal Justice

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

CRJ 101 : Introduction to Criminal Justice

This is a survey course designed to provide students with an overview of the criminal justice system. The principles and practices of police, courts, and corrections are examined. The constitutional basis of our system of justice is explored and emphasized. This course provides the foundation needed for more advanced coursework. Service-Learning required. Pre or co-requisite: ENG 101. Three lecture hours per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Critical Thinking, Ethical Dimensions, and Written Communication. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
1. Describe the functions of various agencies and components of the Criminal Justice System and the relationship between them. 2. Analyze the evolution of law and its administration, particularly with respect to its constitutional foundation. 3. Evaluate the complexity of the administration of criminal justice. 4. Form the basis for further study in law enforcement and criminal justice.

CRJ 111 : College Success Seminar for Criminal Justice

This foundational course is for all Criminal Justice majors and should be taken in their freshman year - first semester. In this course, strategies and resources that promote general college success are explored and applied to relevant topics in the field of Criminal Justice. Students also begin to reflect on what it means to be a Criminal Justice professional, acquire technical competencies needed to be successful in this major, and conduct both academic and internet research. The requirements of both the Career and Transfer Programs will be discussed, as well as the Internship Programs and employment opportunities. Students engage with course content through an active learning environment that may include discussions, readings, service-learning projects, and lectures. Critical reading, thinking, and writing are stressed. The importance of ethics in Criminal Justice will be examined in detail. Students are encouraged to enroll in sections of CRJ 111 linked with sections of CRJ 101 specifically designated as Learning Communities for Criminal Justice. One lecture hour per week. 1 credit Fall, Spring.

Credits

1
1. Students will utilize college and program resources that are relevant to Criminal Justice majors, including opportunities for service learning. 2. Students will identify program and college (print and e) resources to demonstrate knowledge of program, college, state standards and codes of ethics related to being a Criminal Justice Career or Transfer major. 3. Students will apply personalized learning/study skills and evaluate the impact of learning differences to their chosen profession. 4. Students will utilize skills required for success in Criminal Justice professions and formulate academic and career goals that are appropriate for their personal situation and chosen future goals.

CRJ 113 : Criminal Law

The primary focus is on substantive law. General legal principles applicable throughout the majority of the states are covered as well as the substantive law of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The nature and development of criminal law and legal systems, jurisdiction, the criminal act, the criminal state of mind and matters affecting responsibility are studied. Pre or co-requisite: ENG 101. Three lecture hours per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Ethical Dimensions 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
1. Be able to synthesize and apply United States Supreme Court decisions regarding arrest and detention, search and seizure, interrogation, and the assistance of counsel in a professional environment. 2. Demonstrate proficiency through oral and written communication. 3. Will acquire and analyze information from a variety of academic and professional sources in a critical and scientific manner.

CRJ 115 : Report Writing and Information Systems

This course enables students to determine report content through collection, interpretation, and evaluation of data. Emphasis is placed upon interpersonal communication and its application in role-playing experiences in interviews and interrogations. Students complete many report-writing assignments, including operational and administrative reports. Implications of the individual report for an agency's total information capability are studied along with examination of several contemporary information systems, including the processes used for report review and control. Pre or co-requisite: ENG 101, and a grade of C- or higher in both CRJ 101 and CRJ 113. Three class hours a week. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
1. Demonstrate proficiency through oral and written communication. 2. Acquire and analyze information from a variety of academic and professional sources in a critical and scientific manner. 3. Understand and explain the importance of ethics and ethical behavior in the achievement of justice within a diverse environment.

CRJ 219 : Police and Society

Emphasizing the concept that each human being is unique, this course is an in-depth study of the police role in the community. Police-initiated programs directed toward improving intergroup relations are examined and discussed along with selected issues confronting the police and the public they serve. Maximizing the degree of police/community cooperation and interaction is the primary objective. Prerequisite: SOC 101. Three lecture hours per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Multicultural and Social Perspectives. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
1. Identify and consider various perspectives and positions related to law and justice. 2. Select, evaluate, incorporate, and document research information effectively. 3. Articulate and present ideas in a clear, organized manner that demonstrates critical analysis skills. 4. Make connections between human behaviors and consequences. 5. Discuss the pervasive realities of discrimination and stereotype due to race, gender, religion, ethnicity, social class, disability, and sexual orientation. 6. Explain the principles of group behavior and social organizations, how power is wielded in society, and the responsibilities and rights of the human society. Students will develop an understanding of: 1. Differing points of view on the same issue 2. The underlying concepts of justice and fairness 3. The standards for judging human behavior 4. The importance of considering the ramifications of decisions and incorporate and document research information effectively. • Students will be able to articulate and present ideas in a clear, organized manner that demonstrates critical analysis skills. • Students will be able to make connections between human behaviors and consequences. • Students will be able to discuss the pervasive realities of discrimination and stereotype due to race, gender, religion, ethnicity, social class, disability, and sexual orientation. • Students will be able to explain the principles of group behavior and social organizations, how power is wielded in society, and the responsibilities and rights of the human society. Students will develop an understanding of: • Differing points of view on the same issue. • The underlying concepts of justice and fairness. • The standards for judging human behavior. • The importance of considering the ramifications of decisions.

CRJ 221 : Juvenile Offenders

This course provides for a holistic approach to the study of the many factors that relate to juvenile delinquency. The scope and nature of delinquency, methods of prevention, environmental influences, the juvenile justice system, and juvenile corrections will be among topics examined and discussed. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
1. Demonstrate knowledge of the principles, theories, and practices of the Criminal Justice System including the police, court, correctional systems, and the juvenile justice system. 2. Understand and explain the importance of ethics and ethical behavior in the achievement of justice within a diverse environment. 3. Demonstrate proficiency through oral and written communication. 4. Acquire and analyze information from a variety of academic and professional sources in a critical and scientific manner.

CRJ 245 : Corrections

This course is a comprehensive study of the correctional system in the United States. It will provide students with an understanding of the historical framework, theoretical principles, legal precedents, and philosophies that guide correctional practices. Sentencing philosophies, treatment and rehabilitation theories, alternatives to incarceration, probation, parole, and community-based corrections are examined. The civil rights of prisoners and contemporary correctional management practices are discussed to fully understand how our correctional system functions within a larger criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 and CRJ 113 with a grade of C- or better. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
Students will be able to: 1. Discuss the historical framework within which the American correctional system has evolved. 2. Explain how the U.S. Supreme Court decisions have shaped the administration of U.S. correctional facilities and the treatment of offenders. 3. Critically analyze the various offender treatment and rehabilitation theories as well as the relevant sentencing philosophies. 4. Discuss the important differences between probation, parole, and community-based correctional programs. 5. Explain how a correctional system operates to ensure public safety while also respecting the civil rights of offenders.

CRJ 251 : Criminology

The study of the nature of crime, the criminal, and society's approach to the crime problem; the causes of crime; research methods in criminology; the criminal justice system in theory and reality; an introduction to penology. Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of program director. Three lecture hours per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Multicultural and Social Perspectives. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
1. Apply criminological theories to the various causes of crime. 2. Utilize criminological research methods. 3. Identify and critique methods and outcomes in regards to issues of penology. 4. Evaluate various law enforcement strategies in dealing with criminal behavior.

CRJ 256 : Criminal Investigation

Emphasis is placed on the special techniques most appropriate for particular kinds of investigations, including arson, burglary, robbery, electronic-based crime, homicide, and other crimes. Constitutional aspects of investigative procedures are discussed along with procedures for interviewing and recording statements of witnesses and suspects. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 and CRJ 113 both with a grade of C- or better. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
1. Understand and explain the importance of ethics and ethical behavior in the achievement of justice within a diverse environment. 2. Synthesize and apply United States Supreme Court decisions regarding arrest and detention, search and seizure, interrogation, and the assistance of counsel in a professional environment. 3. Demonstrate proficiency through written communication. 4. Acquire and analyze information from a variety of academic and professional sources in a critical and scientific manner.

CRJ 258 : Criminal Procedure

An intensive study and analysis of the United States Constitution and an examination of judicial interpretations of it. Particular attention is placed on the Supreme Court's decisions and impact on criminal justice processes and procedures with respect to arrest, search and seizure, interrogation and confessions, assistance of counsel and freedom of speech. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in CRJ 101, CRJ 113, and CRJ 245. Three lecture hours per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Ethical Dimensions. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
1. Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the principles, theories, and practices of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, correctional systems, and the juvenile justice system. 2. Students will be able to understand and explain the importance of ethics and ethical behavior in the achievement of justice within a diverse environment. 3. Students will be able to synthesize and apply United States Supreme Court decisions regarding arrest and detention, search and seizure, interrogation, and the assistance of counsel in a professional environment. 4. Students will demonstrate proficiency through oral and written communication. 5. Students will acquire and analyze information from a variety of academic and professional sources in a critical and scientific manner

CRJ 259 : Introduction to Criminalistics

An introductory course in forensic science with emphasis on the recognition, collection, and analysis of physical evidence. Students participate in practical exercises utilizing appropriate lab equipment and field kits and investigate simulated crimes and introduce physical evidence at mock trials. Prerequisite: Grade of C- or higher in CRJ 101, CRJ 113, CRJ 219, CRJ 245, CRJ 251, and CRJ 258. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
1. To develop an understanding of the development of forensic sciences; its origin, advances, and trends for the future. 2. To become familiar with the functions and capabilities of the crime lab in its supportive role to the investigator. 3. To become acquainted with the legal and scientific considerations and procedures essential for effective collection, preservation and transmittal of physical evidence. 4. To learn how to properly “process” a Crime Scene. 5. To develop an awareness of the methods used by the Police and the Crime Lab in the analysis of physical evidence. 6. To be able to present the analysis of physical evidence in a Court of Law.