Biology

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

BIO 110 : Biology of Human Reproduction

This is a one semester, combined lecture/discussion course on various aspects of human reproduction. Topics include: human anatomy and physiology, childbirth, fertility, fertility control, fertility impairment, birth control, V.D., sexually transmissible diseases, and pregnancy termination. Extensive use will be made of films and other A.V. materials as they relate to the above topic. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Spring

Credits

3
  1. Compare and contrast Mitosis and Meiosis. Describe the two cell division processes and identify differences in the final outcomes of each process.
  2. Label and explain the functioning of the internal and external organs of the male and female reproductive systems.
  3. Describe hormonal control in the physiological processes related to sexual functioning and in the female menstrual cycle.
  4. Analyze atypical sexual development related to chromosomal and hormonal disorders.
  5. Recognize common ailments of the reproductive system related to STDs caused by viruses, bacteria or miscellaneous organisms.
  6. Explain physiological changes involved in pregnancy and childbirth and some causes of infertility.
  7. Compare various methods of contraceptives and how they may be used effectively.
  8. Distinguish how DNA and RNA compare in structure and function.
  9. Summarize when, where, and how DNA replication takes place.
  10. Relate how DNA and the three types of RNA work together to control protein synthesis and heredity.
  11. Distinguish between different modes of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant and recessive, sex-linked, polygenetic, incomplete dominance, multiple allele, etc.
  12. Review techniques being utilized in the field of biotechnology and appraise existing products currently manufactured in this field.

BIO 111 : General Biology I

This course is designed for non-science and health science majors. Science majors should take BIO 121. This course is an introductory survey of biological principles and topics representing a range of levels of organization, including general background chemistry, cell biology, genetics, evolution and ecology. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4
  1. Identify the characteristics of life.
  2. Follow the steps of the scientific method in order to solve a problem.
  3. Understand the major taxonomic categories and the basis of classification theory.
  4. Describe the composition and functions of organic molecules.
  5. Explain the role of enzymes in biochemical reactions.
  6. Relate cell parts/organelles to their functions.
  7. Differentiate between prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic cells.
  8. Distinguish between plant and animal cells.
  9. Identify the reactants and products in the general reactions of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, as well as explain how they are related.
  10. Describe and compare the processes of mitosis and meiosis.
  11. Describe the structure and function of DNA and its importance in gene expression.
  12. Differentiate between the different types of genetic traits and how these traits are passed on.
  13. Use a Punnett Square to determine genotype and phenotype.
  14. Analyze a Pedigree.
  15. Summarize the processes of Darwinian Evolution & Natural Selection.
  16. Use a food web to identify and distinguish producers, consumers, and decomposers.
  17. At the end of the lab, students will be able to:
  18. Use the scientific method to solve problems.
  19. Use basic laboratory skills to complete lab exercises.
  20. Apply the information learned in lecture to solve problems in a laboratory setting.

BIO 115 : Survey of Human Anatomy and Physiology

A one-semester survey of organs and systems of the human body with regard to basic structure and function. Cells, tissues, chemistry and abnormalities will be considered. Laboratory activities reinforce information discussed in class. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. This course does not substitute for BIO 111, BIO 121, BIO 233 or BIO 234. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

High school Chemistry or Biology or CHM 090.

Upon completion of this course, students should be able to:

  1. Differentiate between Anatomy and Physiology.
  2. Discuss how structure dictates function in the body.
  3. Describe the structure and function of the Integumentary System, Skeletal System, Muscular System, Nervous System, Circulatory System, Respiratory System, Digestive System, Urinary System, Endocrine System and Reproductive System.
  4. Identify organs from all the major systems on models and/or dissected specimens.
  5. Identify Tissue types under the microscope.

BIO 117 : Physiology of Wellness

An introduction to the concept of wellness, nutrition basics, exercise habits, weight control, and cardiovascular disease prevention. Topics include wellness concepts, exercise, diet and nutrition, set point theories, and environmental influences. Three class hours a week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall

Credits

3
  1. Locate and critically read a food label.
  2. Analyze their diet and exercise habits based on current government guidelines.
  3. Identify the components of health and wellness.
  4. Evaluate the risk factors involved with many diseases including cancer, addiction and sexually transmitted diseases.
  5. Make connections between diet and exercise behaviors and heart disease.

BIO 121 : Fundamentals of Biological Science I

This course is designed for science majors. An examination of three areas of contemporary biological science including selected topics in chemistry, necessary as background for cell biology, the structure and function of cells with emphasis on reproduction, membrane functions, and cell energetics, and the molecular mechanisms of genetic control and patterns of inheritance. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

One year of high school biology or chemistry with labs with a grade of C or better, or CHM 090 with a grade of C or better.

  1. Discuss and evaluate the various theories of evolutionary science.
  2. Describe and explain the scientific evidence for Darwinian evolution.
  3. Explain and apply the principles of natural selection.
  4. Analyze and predict the genetic processes involved in the evolution of populations.
  5. Discuss the biological mechanisms of origin and extinction of species.
  6. Compare/contrast the theories of the origins and evolution of life.
  7. Describe and apply systematics and taxonomy of organisms.
  8. Discuss and apply taxonomic keys to classify species of plants and animals.
  9. Describe and explain biotic and abiotic factors that limit populations.
  10. Explain and differentiate the ecological relationships among species.
  11. Discuss and illustrate nutrient cycles, energy flows, and food webs.
  12. Describe and debate human impacts on biological systems, including climate change, biodiversity loss, and resource degradation.
  13. Critically analyze and discuss scientific literature in a written and oral report.
  14. Demonstrate and report on successfully completed laboratory exercises describing methods, results, data analysis, and conclusions.

BIO 122 : Fundamentals of Biological Science II

A consideration of evolutionary theory, including population genetics and a survey of major taxonomic groups of organisms with emphasis on their adaptations and ecology. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 121 with a grade of C or better.

  1. Discuss and evaluate the various theories of evolutionary science.
  2. Describe and explain the scientific evidence for Darwinian evolution.
  3. Explain and apply the principles of natural selection.
  4. Analyze and predict the genetic processes involved in the evolution of populations.
  5. Discuss the biological mechanisms of origin and extinction of species.
  6. Compare/contrast the theories of the origins and evolution of life.
  7. Describe and apply systematics and taxonomy of organisms.
  8. Discuss and apply taxonomic keys to classify species of plants and animals.
  9. Describe and explain biotic and abiotic factors that limit populations.
  10. Explain and differentiate the ecological relationships among species.
  11. Discuss and illustrate nutrient cycles, energy flows, and food webs.
  12. Describe and debate human impacts on biological systems, including climate change, biodiversity loss, and resource degradation.
  13. Critically analyze and discuss scientific literature in a written and oral report.
  14. Demonstrate and report on successfully completed laboratory exercises describing methods, results, data analysis, and conclusions.

BIO 126 : Introduction to Biotechnology

The course covers the tools of the biotechnician: gene manipulation, biotechnological applications in medicine, forensics, and industry, bioethics, and biological risk assessment. Three class hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

high school chemistry and biology.

  1. Discuss and evaluate the various theories of evolutionary science.
  2. Describe and explain the scientific evidence for Darwinian evolution.
  3. Explain and apply the principles of natural selection.
  4. Analyze and predict the genetic processes involved in the evolution of populations.
  5. Discuss the biological mechanisms of origin and extinction of species.
  6. Compare/contrast the theories of the origins and evolution of life.
  7. Describe and apply systematics and taxonomy of organisms.
  8. Discuss and apply taxonomic keys to classify species of plants and animals.
  9. Describe and explain biotic and abiotic factors that limit populations.
  10. Explain and differentiate the ecological relationships among species.
  11. Discuss and illustrate nutrient cycles, energy flows, and food webs.
  12. Describe and debate human impacts on biological systems, including climate change, biodiversity loss, and resource degradation.
  13. Critically analyze and discuss scientific literature in a written and oral report.
  14. Demonstrate and report on successfully completed laboratory exercises describing methods, results, data analysis, and conclusions.

BIO 127 : Introduction to Biotechniques

This course provides an introduction to laboratory research techniques and background as to how they are used in a variety of medical, clinical and scientific disciplines. Students will gain theoretical background and practical experience in lab safety, solid and liquid measurement, solution preparation, protein and DNA concentration determination, DNA and protein gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, ELISA and column chromatography. Good documentation, laboratory and manufacturing practices will be applied throughout the lab. This course emphasizes basic laboratory skills essential for beginning level employment in clinical, academic, and industrial biotechnology laboratories. Two lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

4
  1. After successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
  2. Demonstrate appropriate chemical and biohazard safety procedures.
  3. Maintain good documentation and quality control in laboratory.
  4. Collect, analyze and present data from experimental procedures.
  5. Identify and accurately use appropriate equipment for experimental procedures.
  6. Perform calculations and produce accurate solutions.
  7. Demonstrate skills necessary to produce and analyze recombinant DNA.
  8. Demonstrate skills necessary to maintain and manipulate both bacteria and mammalian cells in culture.
  9. Demonstrate skills necessary to isolate, separate, and analyze protein.
  10. Identify and utilize DNA and protein databases.

BIO 129 : Field Biology

This is an introduction to natural history with special emphasis on identification of Massachusetts terrestrial plants and animals in the outdoors. A wide range of topics will be presented including animal behavior, map reading, geology, basic principles of natural history, biogeography, taxonomy, and collecting. Combined lecture/laboratory two meetings a week. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall

Credits

4
  1. Describe and discuss the essential concepts of ecology, botany, ornithology, and entomology.
  2. Explain the difference between native, non-native and invasive species, and apply taxonomic principles and tools to identify organisms.
  3. Identify various habitats based on biotic and abiotic components.
  4. Compile, accurately label and present a collection of organisms for further study.
  5. Model the process of science through ecological field study focused on local ecosystems in Southeastern Massachusetts, including the way in which scientists collect, analyze and communicate data.

BIO 130 : The Biology and Behavior of Birds

This is an introduction to the biology of birds and their behavior. Special emphasis will be given to species of the United States and Massachusetts. A wide range of topics will be presented including: field identification; bird diversity and taxonomy; courtship and nesting; feather structure, flight, and migration; physiology, including respiration, circulation and feeding strategies; and visual and vocal communication. Students will be required to attend two field trips on either Saturday or Sunday (weather permitting). Classes meet twice weekly in a combined lecture/laboratory setting. Three class hours and two laboratory hours weekly. Instructional Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Spring

Credits

4
  1. Appreciate the diversity of birds of the world and distinguish how birds are classified.
  2. Examine and describe how birds evolved and are still evolving.
  3. Describe various features of anatomy and physiology of birds and explain how these characteristics contribute to the dynamics of flight.
  4. Distinguish some of the ways that birds are physically adapted to fly, communicate, find food, attract mates and reproduce.
  5. Analyze and explain the ecological role of birds in the world and how they interact with humans, particularly in relation to the threats and conservation efforts in our state.

BIO 132 : Marine Biology

This is a one-semester course designed to provide an introduction to the biology of the marine environment. It incorporates the study of the physical and biological components of the oceans, including the formations of the seas and land masses, physical nature of the oceans, and chemistry of seawater with emphasis on types of marine organisms, the ecology of the marine environment, and man's impact on the ocean and its inhabitants. Field trips may be required as part of the lab component of the course, including one all-day trip on a whale watch boat. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

High school chemistry and biology with a grade of C or better or BIO 111 or BIO 121 or SCI 112 or SCI 119 or any CHM course.

  1. Identify the unique challenges of life in the marine environment and describe some of the adaptations and strategies found in marine organisms.
  2. Describe the diversity of marine habitats, demonstrating knowledge of the organisms that live there and applying fundamental ecological concepts such as habitat, niche, population, survivorship, and trophic levels.
  3. Summarize the physical, chemical, and geological characteristics of the ocean.
  4. Apply the scientific method by generating hypotheses, designing controlled experiments and field studies, and analyzing results.
  5. Utilize taxonomic keys to identify a variety of marine organisms.
  6. Analyze the role humans play in the marine environment, from direct intervention such as extracting resources, to indirect intervention such as caused by global climate change.

BIO 140 : Nutrition for Culinarians

This course emphasizes the principles of nutrition and the health-related roles of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, and minerals. The course also covers energy metabolism, food-product labeling, and nutritional requirements throughout the lifespan. Various eating behaviors, recommended dietary intakes, and tools for diet and menu planning are explored. Class projects will include: students keeping a record of their food intake then analyzing it for nutritional adequacy and using nutrition analysis software to adjust recipes to make them more healthful. This course is intended for students enrolled in the Culinary Arts degree program. 3 Credits Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Culinary: CUL 112 or Baking CUL 152 or Permission of the Program Director.

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will read current media articles related to nutrition and use the steps in the Scientific Method to determine the validity of the presented information.
  2. Students will read, discuss and conduct research about foods and their effect on health.
  3. Students will focus on health-related dietary recommendations. Students will record a two-day food recall, and perform a nutritional analysis.
  4. Students will be given a project-based workshop to familiarize them with standardized recipes that they will analyze and revise to meet nutritional criteria.
  5. Students will compare the taste, texture and desirability of the revised product.
  6. Students will study how nutritional requirements change throughout the human life cycle. They will learn about Basal Energy Expenditure and Body Mass Index.
  7. Students will be given the opportunity to follow an exercise program to reduce their Body Mass Index. 
     

BIO 145 : Introduction to Forensic Science

Forensic Science is the application of science to the law and encompasses various scientific disciplines. This course is designed to give students a basic overview of the crime scene investigation process, with a specific focus on the biological tests used when preparing forensic evidence for processing and presentation in court. Topics discussed include organic and inorganic chemical analyses of physical evidence, principles of serology and DNA analysis, arson, fingerprint analysis, drug analysis, and document examination. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4
  1. After successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
  2. Develop an understanding for theories and principles associated with the science of forensics and how it applies to law enforcement.
  3. Illustrate the role and importance of the crime laboratory.
  4. Identify the differences between qualitative and quantitative analysis.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding for DNA collection and handling at the crime scene for analysis in the crime lab.
  6. Identify, collect, and understand the importance of the various types of physical and trace evidence at the crime scene.
  7. Describe the proper procedures for documenting a crime scene through photography, videotape and crime scene diagramming.
  8. Discuss the various methods for analyzing physical evidence.
  9. Demonstrate an understanding for fingerprint composition and comparison.
  10. Employ the various techniques in the development and collection of latent fingerprints at the crime scene and in the crime lab.
  11. Appraise the physiological changes and postmortem artifacts from the body at the crime scene.
  12. Organize the preparation and presentation of the forensic evidence in the courtroom.
  13. Define and understand the concept of chain of custody.
  14. List the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act.
  15. Understand the basics of explosives, trace evidence, firearms, handwriting, and computer analysis.

BIO 154 : Human Physiology

This course acquaints the student with the biological, chemical and physical functions of the human body. The focus of the course is on the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and excretory systems. Laboratory activities will include tests on blood, urine, the heart, and occasional dissections. Not available for credit to students with a C or better in BIO 233 or 234. Three class hours and two laboratory hours a week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

High school Biology or BIO 111 and high school Chemistry or CHM 090.

  1. Define physiology and how the physiology of a structure is related to its anatomy. Give the steps of the Scientific Method and describe the role of clinical trials, such as double blind studies, to development of new therapies.
  2. Describe and explain the concept of homeostasis, how it is maintained by negative feedback, and how failure to maintain homeostasis causes diseases with a particular focus on diabetes.
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic physical and chemical underpinnings of physiology and its clinical application such as acid-base and pH, osmosis, electrolytes, radioisotopes, hydrogen bonding, protein structure, membrane structure & function.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the physiology, and its related anatomy, of the cardiovascular, endocrine, urinary, and respiratory systems and disorders (homeostatic imbalances) of those systems.
  5. Complete laboratory exercises in a safe and proper manner, including those that may involve dissections of preserved or fresh animal specimens, the acquiring and handling of human blood and body fluid specimens, proper handling of laboratory models, microscopes, and spectronic analysis of fluids. Demonstrate knowledge of the Scientific Method & the application of this method to the performance and analysis of laboratory experiments, such as hematocrit, RBC count, ECG, urnanalysis, as well as proper graphic representation and interpretation of the data.

BIO 155 : Topics in Biology

A one-semester course on a specific topic in biology. Topic to be announced each semester. One to three class hours per week. 1 - Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

B or better in one college lab science.

BIO 160 : Introduction to Food Science

Food science is the multidisciplinary study of food, utilizing biology, chemistry, nutrition, engineering and other sciences. This course is designed to give students a basic overview of the food science disciplines, with a specific focus on the scientific method. Topics discussed include the physical and chemical properties of food, food microbiology, food analysis, sensory science, and the effects of food processing and preservation. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support fee applies. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4
  1. After successful completion of this course, student should be able to:
  2. Use the scientific method to conduct inquiry based experiments.
  3. Identify and describe the importance of microorganisms in food processing, spoilage and preservation.
  4. Explain how the cooking process affects food on a molecular level.
  5. Identify and describe methods of food preservation including refrigeration, freezing and pasteurization.
  6. Explain the role of foods and beverages as a vehicle of infection and intoxication.
  7. Prepare a line graph to present experimental data.
  8. Describe the regulatory oversight of the food industry in the United States.

BIO 205 : Animal Behavior

This course is designed to give students an introduction to the principles of Animal Behavior. Topics include Learning, Communication, Cultural Transmission, Mating Systems, Kinship, Predator/Prey interactions, and Aggression, among other. The lab will include field and laboratory experiments. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

  1. After completion of this course, students will be able to:
  2. Evaluate the major principles of Animal Behavior
  3. Compare the behavior of animals to the behavior of humans, when applicable
  4. Apply the principles of Animal Behavior to design and implement an Ethogram project
  5. Demonstrate a basic understanding of how to collect and analyze data
  6. Analyze data and draw conclusions from collected data

BIO 220 : Introduction to Nutrition

This course focuses on human dietary needs. The course emphasizes the health-related roles of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and vitamins. The course also covers minerals, energy metabolism, food-product labeling, and nutritional requirements of the pregnant woman and fetus. Issues of consumer concern are considered throughout this course. Three class hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

BIO 111 or BIO 121 or BIO 233 with a grade of C or better; CHM 111 or higher with a grade of C or better.

  1. List the organs of the digestive system and their functions.
  2. Define metabolism and explain its role in energy production.
  3. Compare and contrast carbohydrates, proteins and lipids and list the functions of each.
  4. State the recommended number of servings for each food group in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
  5. List the 13 vitamins and state the differences between water-soluble and fat-soluble vitamins.
  6. Describe the significance of body mass index and its association with overweight, underweight and obesity.
  7. Discuss the importance of water and minerals in the body.
  8. State the general recommendations for calories from carbohydrates, proteins and fats for an athlete.
  9. Describe the two main ways that pathogenic bacteria can cause food-borne illness.
  10. List the most common food allergies and some of the symptoms of food allergies.
  11. List the most common food preservation techniques.
  12. List the 3 major concerns about genetically-engineered crops.

BIO 230 : Seminar in Scientific Literature and Research Design

Student will learn to locate, read, and interpret peer-reviewed science journal articles. They will examine the characteristics that distinguish quality research in the biological sciences, and write a review paper related to a topic of their choosing. Students will then delve further into aspects of experimental design, culminating in the production of a research proposal related to their topic of choice. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. After completing this course students should be able to:
  2. Critically evaluate a peer reviewed scientific journal article
  3. Synthesize information from multiple primary sources into a clear concise review paper
  4. Apply the scientific method through development of a detailed practical research proposal
  5. Critique the research proposals of peers, and apply constructive criticism to their own proposal
  6. Demonstrate oral communication skills through presentation of research methods and rationale

     

BIO 233 : Human Anatomy and Physiology I

This course studies the structure and function of human tissues, organs, and organ systems. Topics include tissues; integumentary, skeletal, and muscular systems; and the nervous system. The laboratory component includes occasional dissections. The course is intended primarily for students in the health sciences. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

High school chemistry with a grade of C or better or CHM 090 with a grade of CC or better, and BIO 111 or BIO 121 with a grade of C or better.

  1. Define anatomy and physiology and differentiate the levels of structural organization of the human body.
  2. Differentiate anatomical structures in the tissue level of organization (epithelial, connective, muscle, and nervous).
  3. Analyze and interpret anatomical and physiological aspects of the integumentary system.
  4. Identify the anatomical structures of the skeletal and muscular systems at the different levels of organization, and describe the physiological aspects of these systems.
  5. Distinguish and classify the divisions, structures, and functions of the nervous system.
  6. Summarize the physiology of conduction of a nervous impulse or action potential with particular attention to the events which happen at synapses and neuromuscular junctions.
  7. Perform laboratory exercises in a safe and appropriate way, including proper handling of models, microscopes and other laboratory equipment, and the safe handling of any fresh or preserved animal specimens during assigned laboratory dissections.

BIO 234 : Human Anatomy and Physiology II

This course is a continuation of BIO 233. The course covers endocrine, reproductive, digestive, cardiovascular, respiratory, and urinary systems. This course is intended for students in health sciences. The laboratory component includes occasional dissections. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 233 or equivalent Anatomy & Physiology with laboratory with a grade of C or better.

  1. Utilize knowledge of the form and function of human body tissues acquired in Human Anatomy & Physiology I (BIO 233) to learn about the role of those tissues as components of organs in the Sensory, Endocrine, Reproductive, Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Digestive and Urinary Systems.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the correct anatomical terminology for the Sensory, Endocrine, Reproductive, Cardiovascular, Respiratory, Digestive and Urinary organ systems, and relate structures to the proper functioning of each system.
  3. Summarize the interrelated physiology of the various organ systems studied, describing their positive and negative impacts upon one another as well as the homeostatic mechanisms that regulate the function of the body as a whole through various feedback pathways.
  4. Critically analyze information read in their textbooks or other scientific literature, and interpret graphs and tables in similar sources.
  5. Demonstrate the ability to write summaries and reports of data from textbooks, laboratory manuals, library sources and/or online sources to support topics related to Anatomy and Physiology using acceptable formats for scientific papers with proper citation of source material.
  6. Complete laboratory exercises in a safe and proper way, including those which may involve dissections of preserved or fresh animal specimens, the acquiring and handling of human blood or body fluid specimens, proper handling of laboratory models, compound microscopes and other laboratory equipment, and participation and recording of data in physiology experiments.
  7. Demonstrate a working knowledge of the scientific method, and the application of this method to the analysis of case studies, laboratory experiments, or analysis of published literature in the field of study.

BIO 235 : Fundamentals of Ecology

This is an introduction to the principles of ecology, including the interaction of abiotic and biotic components of ecosystems, population biology and interactions, and the effects of human intervention. Emphasis is placed on conducting and communicating research in ecology. This course is intended for students in the life sciences AS program. Some labs are field trips. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Corequisites

  1. After completion of this course, students will be able to
  2. Describe and discuss the essential concepts of ecology
  3. Explain the process of ecological change both in the long term (evolutionary change) and in the short term (succession)
  4. Utilize the tools of science through ecological field study focused on local ecosystems in Southeastern Massachusetts
  5. Analyze data, modeling the way in which scientists handle data, including the use of statistical methods and computers for analysis of data sets.
  6. Compile scientific findings using the primary methods by which scientists communicate with their peers including composing original research papers, oral, and poster
  7. presentations.

BIO 239 : Elements of Microbiology

This course considers the general and medical aspects of microorganisms and discusses methods of identification, sources and modes of infection, inhibition and control of growth, and principles of sanitation. This course includes a study of bacterial physiology and genetic engineering. The laboratory component studies basic techniques. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 233, or BIO 154, or BIO 121, each with a C or better.

  1. Summarize the major physical, chemical and physiological characteristics of microorganisms as a whole and explain their roles in geochemical cycles, as members of the normal human microbiota and as causative agents of infection and disease.
  2. Compare the major groups of microorganisms with respect to the unique physical properties of each group and the unique requirements of each group with respect to nutrition, growth and reproduction.
  3. Summarize the major physical and chemical means of controlling microbial growth, comparing and including an analysis of the roles of antiseptics and disinfectants, and that of antibiotics.
  4. Demonstrate the ability to carry out standard bacteriological techniques, and to utilize that knowledge to separate mixed cultures of bacteria, and to identify specific bacteria in those cultures from the results of standard microbiological tests.
  5. Explain the relationship between microorganisms and infectious disease, and describe some of the methods for slowing or preventing the spread of disease from one individual to another.
  6. Summarize the functions of the human immune system with regard to warding off infectious disease; compare and contrast the roles of proper sanitation, immunization and community planning in preventing and controlling the spread of infectious diseases.
  7. Explain the role of Microbial Genetics, Genetic Engineering and Recombinant DNA in our modern world.

BIO 240 : Cell Biology

This course considers the molecular structure of cells, cell energetics, the role of nucleic acids, cell division, and fertilization. The laboratory covers microscopic studies of cells and methods for studying macromolecules and cells. Three lecture hours, and three laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 121 with a grade of C+ or better.

  1. Become familiar with the various subcellular structures and organelles inside eukaryotic cells.
  2. Understand how proteins and lipids are synthesized, transported, and degraded.
  3. Learn about vesicular trafficking, endocytosis, and exocytosis.
  4. Gain an introduction to cellular signal transduction mechanisms, also known as cell signaling.
  5. Become familiar with the molecular structure and behaviors of the cytoskeleton.
  6. Understand the basic events of the cell cycle and the importance of programmed cell death (apoptosis) and what happens when the cell cycle becomes uncontrolled (cancer).
  7. Become familiar with the various categories of stem cells.
  8. Gain an appreciation for the relevance of cell biology to human disease and current medical practices.

BIO 250 : Introduction to Immunology

This course describes the molecular and cellular interactions involved in immune responses. Topics include: development of the immune system, innate immunity, immunoglobulin structure and genetics, antigen-antibody reactions, the major histocompatibility complex and antigen presentation, T cell receptors (genetics, structure, selection), T cell activation and effector functions, immune responses to infections, organisms and tumors, autoimmune diseases, allergies, immune deficiencies and AIDS, activation and regulation of the immune response Antibody structure and function; applications of monoclonal antibodies in biotechnology and medicine; tolerance. Laboratory involves antibody purification, immunoprecipitation assays, immunoblotting, and ELISAs. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

BIO 239 with a grade of C+ or better.