Occupational Therapy

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

OTA 111 : Introduction to Occupational Therapy

This course provides the foundations of occupational therapy (OT) principles and practice. OT practitioners apply core values, knowledge and skills to assist clients to engage in valued everyday activities (occupations) to support health and participation in life. The theoretical foundations, history, philosophical and ethical bases of the profession and its personnel are explored. The theoretical foundations, history, philosophical and ethical bases of the profession and its personnel are explored. The collaborative role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant and the Registered Occupational Therapist and the roles of the inter-professional team in the health care delivery system are explored. The effects of diverse contextual factors and environment on participation in occupations are a focus. The underlying principles of inter-professional collaboration, evidence-informed decision-making, and lifelong learning are firmly established. Labs include college success strategies, information literacy and preparation for fieldwork. Students clarify their personal values, learn core professional values, attitudes, and behaviors, develop communication skills and sensitivity to factors of culture and diversity in the delivery of OT services. Lecture hours include 15 hours of off-site observational fieldwork. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Competency met: First Year Experience (9.0) Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Admission to the OTA program or prior approval of the program director.

Corequisites

BIO 234, HLT 101 or HLT 102. HLT 106 or MAA 101 may be substituted for this requirement.

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of human development throughout the lifespan, as expressed by an understanding of developmental tasks and meaningful occupations throughout the lifespan. B.1.1 (b)
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of concepts of human behavior derived from behavioral sciences, social sciences, and the science of occupation. B.1.1 (c)
  3. Explain the role of sociocultural, socioeconomic, and diversity factors, and lifestyle choices in contemporary society to meet the needs of persons, groups, and populations (e.g., principles of psychology, sociology, and abnormal psychology). B.1.2
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the social determinants of health for persons, groups, and populations with or at risk for disabilities and chronic health conditions. This includes an understanding of the epidemiological factors that impact the public health and welfare of populations. B.1.3
  5. Apply scientific evidence, theories, models of practice, and frames of reference that underlie the practice of occupational therapy to guide and inform interventions for persons, groups, and populations in a variety of practice contexts and environments. B.2.1
  6. Define the process of theory development and its importance to occupational therapy. B.2.2
  7. Apply knowledge of occupational therapy history, philosophical base, theory, and sociopolitical climate and their importance in meeting society’s current and future occupational needs as well as how these factors influence and are influenced by practice. B.3.1
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of and apply the interaction of occupation and activity, including areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, context(s) and environments, and client factors. B.3.2
  9. Explain to consumers, potential employers, colleagues, third-party payers, regulatory boards, policymakers, and the general public the distinct nature of occupation and the evidence that occupation supports performance, participation, health, and well-being. B.3.3
  10. Demonstrate knowledge of scientific evidence as it relates to the importance of balancing areas of occupation; the role of occupation in the promotion of health; and the prevention of disease, illness, and dysfunction for persons, groups, and populations. B.3.4
  11. Demonstrate knowledge of the effects of disease processes including heritable diseases, genetic conditions, mental illness, disability, trauma, and injury on occupational performance. B.3.5
  12. Demonstrate activity analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, context(s) and environments, and client factors to implement the intervention plan. B.3.6
  13. Demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to safety regulations throughout the occupational therapy process as appropriate to the setting and scope of practice. B.3.7
  14. Demonstrate therapeutic use of self, including one’s?personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process in both individual and group interaction. B.4.1
  15. Demonstrate knowledge of the use of technology in practice, including electronic documentation systems, virtual environments (communication via computer, includes simulated real time or near time environments such as chat rooms, email, video conference, or computer-based data collection), and tele-health technology B.4.15
  16. Understand and demonstrate the principles of the teaching–learning process using educational methods and health literacy education approaches. (Future courses will require students to design activities and clinical training and instruction for the client, caregiver, family, significant others, and communities at the level of the audience.) B.4.21
  17. Identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, families, communities, and members of the inter-professional team in a responsive and responsible manner that supports a team approach to the promotion of health and wellness. B.4.23
  18. Demonstrate effective intra professional OT/OTA collaboration to explain the role of the occupational therapy assistant and occupational therapist in the screening and evaluation process. B.4.24
  19. Demonstrate awareness of the principles of inter-professional team dynamics to perform effectively in differ-ent team roles to plan, deliver, and evaluate patient- and population-centered care as well as population health programs and policies that are safe, timely, efficient, effective, and equitable. B.4.25
  20. Identify and communicate to the occupational therapist the need to design community and primary care programs to support occupational performance for persons, groups, and populations. B.4.27.
  21. Factors, policy issues and social systems Identify and explain the contextual factors; current policy issues; and socioeconomic, political, geographic, and demographic factors on the delivery of occupational therapy services for persons, groups, and populations and social systems as they relate to the practice of occupational therapy, and explain the contextual factors; current policy issues; and socioeconomic, political, geographic, and demographic factors on the delivery of occupational therapy services for persons, groups, and populations and social systems as they relate to the practice of occupational therapy. B.5.1
  22. Explain the role and responsibility of the practitioner to advocate for changes in service delivery policies, effect changes in the system, recognize opportunities in emerging practice areas, and advocate for opportunities to expand the occupational therapy assistant’s role. The role and responsibility of the practitioner to advocate for changes in service delivery policies, effect changes in the system, recognize opportunities in emerging practice areas, and advocate for opportunities to expand the occupational therapy assistant’s role. B.5.2
  23. Demonstrate knowledge of the OT/OTA student supervision and the criteria to serve as a Fieldwork Educator. Define strategies for effective, competency-based legal and ethical supervision of occupational therapy assistants and non-occupational therapy personnel.
  24. Locate and demonstrate understanding of professional literature, including the quality of the source of in-formation, to make evidence-based practice decisions in collaboration with the occupational therapist. Explain how scholarly activities and literature contribute to the development of the profession. B.6.1
  25. Understand the principles of teaching and learning in preparation for work in an academic setting. B.6.6
  26. Demonstrate knowledge of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and AOTA Standards of Practice and use them as a guide for ethical decision-making in professional interactions, client interventions, employment settings, and when confronted with personal and organizational ethical conflicts. B.7.1
  27. Professional Engagement - Demonstrate knowledge of how the role of a professional is enhanced by participating and engaging in local, national, and international leadership positions in organizations or agencies. B.7.2
  28. Promote occupational therapy by educating other professionals, service providers, consumers, third-party payers, regulatory bodies, and the public. B.7.3
  29. Identify and develop strategies for ongoing professional development to ensure that practice is consistent with current and accepted standards  B.7.4.
  30. Develop strategies for test taking including multi-select multiple choice questions.
  31. Understand and use a range of medical abbreviations.
  32. Decode a client progress note.
  33. Create a basic SOAP note.
  34. Demonstrate technical and informational literacy, including basic familiarity with hardware and software, word processing, use of the internet for research and email, and use of BCC Access and eLearning.
  35. Demonstrate professional behavior expected of a college student as outlined in the Bristol Community College Catalog & Student Handbook and OTA Program Policies.

Level 1 Observation Fieldwork Objectives

  1. Describe the range of occupational therapy service delivery models and frames of reference.
  2. Develop observation skills and basic analysis of observations.
  3. Observe and describe the role of occupational therapy practitioners and inter-professional team members
  4. Recognize and reflect on the effects of psychological, social, cultural, and diversity factors on clients’ participation in occupation
  5. Create an occupational profile, and basic intervention plan, incorporating the effects of psychological and social (including cultural and diversity) factors on the client’s engagement in occupation into all aspects of the OT Process-evaluation, intervention and outcomes.
  6. Observe various communication styles and report on the effects of each on therapeutic rapport with clients
  7. Demonstrate therapeutic communication skills (active listening, rephrasing, congruent verbal and non-verbal skills, and sensitivity to factors of culture and diversity) 43. Recognize and utilize basic medical language and occupational therapy terminology 44. Demonstrate professional behavior (professional ethics, confidentiality, observation of safety measures & standard precautions, timeliness, professional development, etc.)

OTA 117 : Psychosocial Performance

This course explores the role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant in various service delivery models in the psychosocial area of Occupational Therapy practice. Students learn selected frames of reference, concepts of mental health and mental illness across the life span, and the effects of psychosocial dysfunction on areas of occupation. Client factors, therapeutic interaction concepts and skills, and occupational therapy process and methods are studied. Lab sessions incorporate the theoretical principles presented in lecture. Students learn to analyze activity demands relative to performance skills and contexts in areas of occupation. The therapeutic media component of the lab provides additional opportunities to demonstrate understanding of the meaning and dynamics of occupation by leading and/or evaluating activity groups utilizing purposeful activity. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours. Fall, Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Admission to the OTA program or permission of the program director.

Corequisites

Lecture Objectives:

  1. Articulate an understanding of the importance of the history and philosophical base of the profession of occupational therapy.
  2.  Articulate to actual and potentially concerned parties both the unique nature of occupation as viewed by the profession and the value of occupation to support.participation and engagement in context for the client.
  3. Describe models of practice and frames of reference that are used in psychosocial occupational therapy.
  4. Delineate the domain and roles of the occupational therapy assistant, and the roles of other team members in psychosocial practice settings.
  5. Recognize, describe and utilize common psychosocial and OT terminology and selected practice theories used in the profession.
  6. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of human development throughout the life span, with emphasis on psychosocial skill development.
  7. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the concepts of human behavior, motivation and change drawn from principles of occupational therapy, psychology, sociology, biology and abnormal psychology and occupational science.
  8. Recognize, describe and discuss common psychosocial dysfunctions, and occupational therapy treatment considerations.
  9. Understand the effects on occupational performance of physical and mental health, disease processes, disability, loss, and traumatic injury to an individual within the cultural context of family, community and society.
  10. Articulate the influence of social conditions and ethical contexts upon persons with psychosocial dysfunction.
  11. Express support and advocacy for quality of life, wellbeing, and occupation of the individual, group, organization or population to promote physical and mental health and prevent injury or dysfunction while considering context (e.g. cultural, physical, social, personal, spiritual, temporal, and virtual). 
  12. Describe a range of practice settings where psychosocial interventions occur.
  13. Demonstrate knowledge of global social issues and healthcare needs with respect to the psychosocial domain.

The following objectives will be met through on campus participation in laboratory sessions:

  1. Describe the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity, including the interaction of areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, contexts, and psychosocial client factors.
  2. Describe, discuss, demonstrate and evaluate group leadership skills and effective therapeutic use of self through leading a group in class.
  3. Describe and discuss selected activity demands and factors and demonstrate the psychosocial applications of activity analysis.
  4. Demonstrate task analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, context(s) and environments, and client factors to implement intervention plan.
  5. Grade and adapt the environment, tools, materials, occupations, and interventions to reflect the changing needs of the client and the sociocultural context
  6. Describe and discuss concepts of health, recovery and wellness as applied to psychosocial client populations.
  7. Demonstrate a range of approaches to group intervention using principles of group development and group dynamics across the lifespan to include training in self-care, self-management, health management and maintenance, home management, and community and work integration.
  8. Demonstrate research skills in areas of psychopathology and therapeutic activity selection.
  9. Describe, demonstrate and evaluate the use of therapeutic media through class activities, such as teaching a therapeutic media project using oral presentation skills.
  10. Identify the mechanisms, systems and techniques needed to properly maintain, organize, and prioritize workloads and intervention settings including inventories.
  11. Develop beginning occupational therapy process skills of data collection, observation, evaluation, treatment planning, implementation, and documentation.
  12. Evaluate considerations of how client gender, age, race, socioeconomic, religious, and cultural identification can best be utilized for sensitive and effective implementation of the OT process.
  13. Discuss how occupational therapy history and occupational therapy theory, and the sociopolitical climate influence practice.
  14. Describe the contexts of health care, education, community, and social systems as they relate to the practice of occupational therapy.
  15. Identify the potential impact of current policy issues and the social, economic, political, geographic, or demographic factors on the practice of occupational therapy.
  16. Identify the role and responsibility of the practitioner to advocate for changes in service delivery policies, to effect changes in the system, and to recognize opportunities in emerging practice areas.

OTA 121 : Cognitive and Sensorimotor Performance

This course demonstrates how performance skills, performance patterns, context, activity demands, and client factors influence areas of occupation. The course explores the collaborative role of the COTA and OTR in the occupational therapy process. The lab emphasizes therapeutic intervention related to Activities of Daily Living, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation and develops skills in family/caretaker training, environmental adjustments, adaptive equipment, assistive technology, and neuromuscular techniques. Three class hours and two lab hours a week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Upon successful completion of the lecture portion of this course, the student will know or be able to:

  1. Identify the various areas of occupation. (B.3.2).
  2. Describe the importance of balancing the various areas of occupation to achieve health and wellness within various contexts. (B.3.4)
  3. Describe the effect of physical and cognitive dysfunction on occupational performance. (B.3.5)
  4. Recognize and describe the psychosocial implications of a physical disability. (B.3.5)
  5. Demonstrate basic activity analysis skills for areas of occupation. (B.3.6)
  6. Apply abilities to grade and adapt activities for those tasks that a client can no longer perform or performs with great difficulty. (B.4.18)
  7. Identify adaptive equipment and assistive technology available to enhance function in areas of occupation. (B.4.3)
  8.  Describe the collaborative role of the OTA and the OTR in the occupational therapy process of data collection, assessment, intervention planning, implementation, and documentation. (B.4.4)
  9. Appreciate and analyze the influence of client’s gender, age, race, environment, sociocultural, socioeconomic, and lifestyle choices and their effect on the OT process. (B.4.4)
  10. Understand and describe common types of progress notes in OT practice: SOAP, DAP and narrative notes. (B.4.29)
  11. Identify commonly utilized abbreviations in OT practice. (B.4.29)
  12. Appreciate the need for well-written, effective documentation to ensure correct reimbursement. (B.4.29)
  13. Describe various sensorimotor approaches (Rood, Brunnstrom, PNF, NDT, CIMT) and demonstrate beginning application of techniques. (B.4.0; B.2.1)
  14. Describe principles of joint protection, energy conservation, work simplification, wellness, safety, and health promotion. (B.4.10)
  15. 15. Describe the use of preparatory methods (i.e. therapeutic exercise, PAM’s), practice skills (i.e. contrived activities such as cones or pegboards), purposeful activities, and occupation in the overall intervention of client with physical dysfunction. (B.4.10; B.4.21; B.4.17)
  16. Identify areas of cognition and demonstration of application of OT interventions with clients with cognitive deficits. (B.4.9; B.4.9)
  17. Utilizing the internet and various databases, research assistive technology products and identify populations which would benefit from these products. (B.4.11)
  18. Identify the roles of the generalist and the specialist in driving assessments and when to refer to a specialist. (B.4.14; B.4.26)
  19. Describe dysphagia, precautions, and social and contextual impact for clients with dysphagia. (B.4.16)
  20. Utilizing a case study format, demonstrate beginning intervention planning with emphasis on developing home programming of therapeutic exercise program and identification of activity to enhance function. (B.4.27)
  21. Identify various practice settings for OT interventions and the impact of these settings/contexts on the delivery of OT services. (B.4.27; B.4.18)
  22. Demonstrate ability to effectively create patient/caregiver educational handouts to complement OT treatment. (B.4.23)
  23. Identify other specialists (i.e. SLP, PT, audiologist) whose intervention would benefit a patient’s plan of care. (B.4.26) 
  24. Understand the intervention process from referral to discharge. (B.4.22)
  25. Recognize the need for termination of OT services when goals have been achieved or when it is determined that goals are not achievable. (B.4.28)
  26. Demonstrate oral presentation skills via individual and/or group presentation.

Upon successful completion of the lab portion of this course, the student will know or be able to:

  1. Demonstrate safety awareness for self, clients, and caregivers including environment, equipment and body mechanics. (B.3.7)
  2. Describe methods for controlling the spread of infection, including hand-washing, Universal and Standard Precautions, and use of personal protective equipment. (B.3.7)
  3. Demonstrate beginning knowledge of commercially available adaptive equipment, custom-made modifications/adaptations, environmental modifications, adaptive strategies including positioning, grading, one handed techniques, energy conservation and joint protection techniques, diaphragmatic and pursed lip breathing, and relaxation techniques to facilitate task completion. (B.4.3)
  4. Provide remedial and compensatory intervention for cognitive process deficits. (B.4.3 B.4.9)
  5. Demonstrate proper technique for obtaining the following vital signs: heart rate, blood pressure, respiration rate, oxygen saturation; describe the signs and symptoms of distress and identify abnormal vital signs. (B.4.5)
  6. Perform standardized sensory and perceptual testing. Recognize normal and abnormal responses. Describe the potential impact of sensory and perceptual impairment on function and safety and develop treatment interventions for sensory and perceptual loss. (B.4.5)
  7. Perform standardized testing (circumferential girth and volumetrics) of edema and demonstrate edema reduction techniques (elevation, cryotherapy, compression, retrograde massage, active range of motion). (B.4.5)
  8. Describe the variables used to grade pain, the pain cycle and techniques for reducing pain (breathing, relaxation, positioning, exercise, activity, physical agent modalities, and medication). (B.4.5) 
  9. Demonstrate standardized grip and pinch testing. (B.4.5)
  10. Demonstrate assessment and intervention in activities of daily leaving (ADL) (self-care, meal preparation), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) (self-management, home management, community reintegration), and work reintegration, breaking down into component parts. (B.4.5; B.4.21)
  11. Describe performance objectively utilizing accepted terminology (Functional Independence Measure scale and CARE tool). (B.4.5)
  12. Recognize low vision disorders and develop compensatory treatment interventions. (B.4.4)
  13. Describe scar characteristics, recognize signs and symptoms of healing or infection, and demonstrate scar management techniques (massage, stretch, compression, elastomer patch fabrication and application, desensitization). (B.4.4)
  14. Describe performance skills that facilitate coordination & demonstrate the application of intervention principles to compensate for and remediate coordination deficits. (B.4.4; B.4.9)
  15. Design and grade therapeutic exercise programs utilizing appropriate equipment. (B.4.0)
  16. Demonstrate proper technique in performing range of motion (passive, active-assistive, active), and passive stretch, isotonic and isometric strengthening. (B.4.10)
  17. Describe beginning appreciation of the general principles of motor performance and re-training. Identify the performance skills that impact motor performance. Simulate basic facilitation and inhibition techniques. (B.4.10)
  18. Provide remedial and compensatory intervention for physical and neuromuscular deficits. (B.4.9)
  19. Identify factors that increase risk for falls and other injuries around the home and describe a variety of strategies and equipment that can reduce injury. (B.4.18)
  20. Identify the major categories of wheelchairs and wheelchair parts; provide training in wheelchair mobility,  wheelchair management, and community mobility. Identify seating issues and solutions. (B.4.11; B.4.13)
  21. Recognize and name various types of ambulatory devices; demonstrate safe use and adjustment. (B.4.13)
  22. Demonstrate safe functional transfers (toilet, tub, bed, chair) utilizing the appropriate adaptive equipment. (B.4.13)
  23. Provide training in techniques to optimize functional transfers and functional mobility. (B.4.14)
  24. Demonstrate safe and effective method of administration of superficial thermal and modalities, adhering to established parameters. Identify precautions and/or contraindications. (B.4.17) 
  25. Demonstrate ability to educate clients, colleagues, and other healthcare providers in a professional manner through effective written, oral, or other forms of nonverbal communication. (B.4.23)

OTA 125 : Movement in Human Performance

In this course, students incorporate their knowledge of anatomy and physiology to study muscle groups and their function relative to performing various activities. Clinical application of kinesiology and biomechanics to purposeful activity is explored. Students learn therapeutic applications of activity across the occupational performance areas. Fundamentals of the activity analysis process are emphasized. Prevention, health maintenance, and safety programs are integrated into the course. Students develop competencies in analysis and intervention related to range of motion, muscle testing, orthotics, and prosthetics in the lab. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Describe general principles of kinesiology.
  2. Describe the biomechanical frame of reference.
  3. Utilizing correct terminology, describe and demonstrate ROM of the UE and LE.
  4. Articulate importance of accurate/objective measurements of ROM/MMT to facilitate appropriate selection of activities and occupations in intervention planning.
  5. Demonstrate ability to document assessment results adhering to applicable standards.
  6. Describe the collaborative roles of the OTR and the COTA in the evaluation and intervention planning processes for clients.
  7. Analyze occupational performance for joint movements and muscle actions.
  8. Articulate the role of occupation in the promotion of health and wellness and the prevention of disease/disability for individuals, families, and society in the areas of body mechanics, body awareness, and ergonomics.
  9. Describe various components of prevention, health maintenance, and safety program.
  10. Identify anatomical and biomechanical consideration in UE splinting.
  11. Describe the use of orthotics to enhance occupational performance.
  12. Properly fabricate two UE custom orthotics and, utilizing a splint check out, objectively assess the outcome.
  13. Identify various properties of splinting materials and appropriate use.
  14. Demonstrate appropriate documentation for fabrication of orthosis, including pt education (wear/care schedule, purpose of the orthosis, goals of splinting, etc.)
  15. Demonstrate clear, thorough communication skills, both oral and written, in all assignments and role-playing situations.
  16. Utilize word processing programs for completion of all written assignments.
  17. Utilize a variety of scholarly resources (i.e. textbooks and professional journals) as well as various internet search engines to complete assignments/projects.

OTA 127 : Psychosocial Therapeutic Modalities

In this course, students apply their knowledge of psychosocial performance and use their ability to analyze tasks relative to areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, context(s), and client factors to implement intervention plans in mental health and geriatric services. Students develop skills in therapeutic use of self, environment, and purposeful activity. The collaborative OTR/COTA relationship in the Occupational Therapy process is emphasized. The course studies community programming and treatment of populations via site visits and fieldwork opportunities. Students participate in laboratory to study the application and evaluation of advanced psychosocial group process. Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory hours, and three hours of fieldwork. Spring, Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

OTA 111 and OTA 117; or OTA 117 and permission of the program director.

Lecture Objectives:

  1. Describe the OTR/OTA collaborative relationship in mental health acute, long term care and community settings.
  2.  Describe the role of the OTA in assessment and treatment of mental health dysfunction.
  3. Identify the importance of inter-professional Communication for the team and the client.
  4. Describe and demonstrate the occupational therapy communication and interview process with multicultural client populations.
  5. Describe the purpose of selected psychosocial assessments.
  6. Discuss considerations of the occupational therapy process with special populations across the lifespan, ex: persons with mental illness, substance abuse, developmental disabilities, sensory dysfunction and dementia.
  7. Discuss the effects of age, race, culture, gender and environment on individuals within the context of family, community and society while making effective treatment choices with clients in a variety of service delivery settings.

Lab Objectives:

  1.  Participate in a laboratory group experience to study and evaluate advanced psychosocial group process and develop cultural competence.
  2. Plan and implement individual and group treatment programs including formulating a group protocol to promote client health, occupational function and improved quality of life.
  3. Apply activity analysis theory to the design of a group and an activity program.
  4.  Develop and demonstrate knowledge of appropriate treatment choices for a variety of psychosocial dysfunctions within appropriate contexts of acute, long term and community settings.
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of models of healthcare education, community and social systems as related to the practice of occupational therapy.
  6. Demonstrate ongoing assessment of clients status re: occupational needs, functional skills and interests through observation, intervention application and documentation of laboratory activity groups.
  7. Document need and rationale for service and goals of intervention through writing behavioral objectives that meet reimbursement standards of various agencies.
  8. Document client progress and provider accountability through writing SOAP notes.

Fieldwork Objectives:

  1. Demonstrate reliable work habits, professional demeanor and professional dress.
  2. Develop skills in community needs assessment and community education.
  3. Establish meaningful and comfortable relationships with clients and staff in a multicultural community setting.
  4. Demonstrate good judgment in seeking assistance, responding to feedback, and conducting oneself ethically and with appropriate courtesy and professional attitudes in client and staff relationships.
  5. Formulate general therapeutic goals and objectives and apply to a selected population.
  6. Initiate and /or assist in the therapeutic activity process.
  7. Demonstrate education and advocacy efforts for the benefit of the consumer, clinical staff, community and the occupational therapy profession.
  8. Communicate in writing clearly, concisely, and professionally, utilizing appropriate terminology.
  9. Demonstrate achievement of the OTA program and clinical site's fieldwork objectives.
  10. Demonstrate knowledge of psychosocial factors influencing engagement in occupation with client- centered, meaningful, occupation-based outcomes.
  11. Demonstrate therapeutic use of self including ones personal insights, perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process in both individual and group interaction.

OTA 233 : Common Conditions of Physical Dysfunction

This course is presented in the third semester and builds on the student's foundation in movement in human performance, performance skills, performance patterns, activity demands, contexts, and client factors. Students learn to apply this knowledge to problem-solving various therapeutic interventions for specific, commonly referred conditions affecting adults. The COTA role in the occupational therapy process is emphasized. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Fall, Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Upon successful completion of the lecture portion of this course, the student will know or be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and appreciation of the role of sociocultural, socioeconomic, and diversity factors and lifestyle choices in contemporary society through analysis of the effects of disability, culture, gender, race, age, lifestyle choice, environment, and socioeconomic status on the occupational therapy process (B.1.2).
  2. Discuss the importance of evaluation tests and measurements in the intervention planning process. Articulate the importance of using statistics, tests, and measurements for the purpose of delivering evidence-based practice (B.1.4).
  3. Explain the effects of genetic conditions, chronic disease processes, and traumatic injuries on the occupational performance of individuals (B.3.5).
  4. Describe the clinical presentation and functional impact of the conditions of physical dysfunction commonly referred to OT (B.3.5).
  5. Identify specific areas of evaluation appropriate for each diagnosis (B.4.4).
  6. Articulate the role of the occupational therapy assistant and occupational therapist in the screening and evaluation process along with the importance of and rationale for supervision and collaborative work between the occupational therapy assistant and occupational therapist in that process (B.4.24).
  7. Identify when to recommend to the occupational therapist the need for referring clients for additional evaluation (B.4.26).
  8. Analyze case studies to develop an occupational profile and appropriate OT interventions for depicted clients based upon client factors, performance skills, performance patterns, and context and environments (B.4.0).
  9. Describe specific therapeutic interventions for each diagnosis to enhance independence and safety in occupational performance, participation and wellbeing (B.4.10).
  10. Develop therapeutic use of self and clinical reasoning skills as evidenced in various intervention planning classroom scenarios (B.4.1).
  11. Utilizing a case study format, identify appropriate home and community programs to enhance patient’s safety and independence in performance of occupations in the contexts most relevant to the client (B.4.27).
  12. Use the teaching–learning process with the client, family, significant others, colleagues, other health providers, and the public. Collaborate with the  occupational therapist and learner to identify appropriate educational methods (B.4.21).
  13. Develop educational materials for client, family, and caregivers for specific populations to enhance performance and safety (B.4.23).
  14. Effectively communicate and work inter professionally with those who provide services to individuals and groups in order to clarify each member's  responsibility in executing an intervention plan (B.4.23).
  15. Recognize and communicate the need to refer to specialists (both internal and external to the profession) for consultation and intervention (B.4.10).
  16. Demonstrate ability to grade and/or adapt selected interventions to reflect changing needs of clients and/or contexts (B.4.18, B.4.22).
  17. Discuss the collaborative COTA/OTR role in the OT process of treatment, documentation, and discharge planning with common physical conditions (B.4.24).
  18. Recommend to the occupational therapist the need for termination of occupational therapy services when stated outcomes have been achieved, or it has been determined that they cannot be achieved. Assist with developing a summary of occupational therapy outcomes, recommendations, and referrals (B.4.28).
  19. Articulate the importance of evidenced based practice in clinical decision-making. Identify how scholarly activities can be used to evaluate professional practice, service delivery, and/or professional issues (B.6.1).
  20. Discuss ethical considerations in the occupational therapy process. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and Ethics Standards and AOTA Standards of Practice and use them as a guide for ethical decision-making in professional interactions, client interventions, and employment settings (B.7.1).

Upon successful completion of the lab portion of this course, the student will know or be able to:

  1. Use sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to safety regulations throughout the occupational therapy process as appropriate to the setting and scope of practice (B.3.7).
  2.  Assist with the development of occupation-based intervention plans and strategies (including goals and methods to achieve them) on the basis of the stated needs of the client as well as data gathered during the evaluation process in collaboration with the client and others. Intervention plans and strategies must be culturally relevant, reflective of current occupational therapy practice, and based on available evidence. Interventions address the following components:
  • The occupational profile, including participation in activities that are meaningful and necessary for the client to carry out roles in home, work, and community environments.
  • Client factors, including values, beliefs, spirituality, body functions (e.g., neuromuscular, sensory and pain, visual, perceptual, cognitive, mental) and body structures (e.g., cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, genitourinary, integumentary systems).
  • Performance patterns (e.g., habits, routines, rituals, roles).
  • Context (e.g., cultural, personal, temporal, virtual) and environment (e.g., physical, social). 
  • Performance skills, including motor and praxis skills, sensory–perceptual skills, emotional regulation skills, cognitive skills, and communication and social skills (B.4.0).
  1. Select and provide direct occupational therapy interventions and procedures to enhance safety, health and wellness, and performance in ADLs, IADLs, education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation (B.4.10).
  2. Identify a need and perform education in energy conservation, work simplification, joint protection techniques, and relaxation and breathing techniques to enhance performance in ADLs, IADLs, education, work, play, rest, sleep, leisure, and social participation. (B.5.2).
  3. Provide therapeutic use of occupation, exercises, and activities (e.g., occupation-based intervention, purposeful activity, preparatory methods) (B.4.10).
  4. Identify need and implement strategies for fine and gross motor coordination, balance, and posture (B.4.10).
  5. Evaluate and intervene for edema and scar hypersensitivity for individuals with orthopedic impairments including patients with peripheral nerve injuries (B.4.10).
  6. Incorporate weight-bearing and movement precautions for patients with lower extremity total joint replacements (B.4.10).
  7. Perform and educate in residual limb/foot care for individuals with lower extremity amputations and prevention of decubitus ulcers for individuals at high risk or skin breakdown (B.4.21).
  8. Perform, grade, and educate in therapeutic activities and exercise for patients with neuro-musculoskeletal, orthopedic, respiratory, and/or cardiovascular impairments (B.4.9).
  9. Implement adaptive equipment / techniques, assistive technology, and modifications to enhance occupational performance for physical, cognitive, perceptual, and/or process skills deficits (B.4.9).
  10. Understand bed positioning, bed mobility and proper seating for patients with orthopedic conditions of the spine, lower extremity joint replacements, lower extremity amputations, and neuro-musculoskeletal performance impairments (B.4.13).

OTA 235 : Professional Practice Skills

This course focuses on the OTA role in the delivery and management of occupational therapy services. It covers departmental operations, supervisory requirements, personnel development and supervision, quality assurance, documentation of OT services, compliance with regulations, reimbursement, and national and state credentialing requirements. Students discuss legal and ethical responsibilities and integrate values, attitudes, and behaviors congruent with the profession of occupational therapy. The lab component provides experience in clinical reasoning, documentation of the OT process of evaluation, intervention planning, implementation and review, and consumer and professional advocacy skills. Students formulate, analyze, and compare interventions through documentation of clients' engagement in occupation. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours and three fieldwork hours per week. Fall; Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

OTA 121, OTA 125, and OTA 127 or prior approval of the program director.

  1.  Articulate the role of the OTA in the delivery of occupational therapy services (B.5.1)
  2. Articulate the role of the OTA in management of occupational therapy services (B.5.1)
  3. Identify and explain the contextual factors as they relate to occupational therapy practice (B.5.1)
  4. Identify and explain current policy issues as they relate to occupational therapy practice (B.5.1)
  5. Recognize socioeconomic, political, geographic, and demographic factors on the delivery of occupational therapy services for persons, groups, and populations and social systems as they relate to the practice of occupational therapy. (B. 5.1)
  6. Explain an understanding of the business aspects of practice including, but not limited to, financial management, billing, and coding. (B.5.3)
  7. Identify the need in the development, marketing, and management of service delivery options. (B.5.6)
  8. Demonstrate the ability to participate in the development, marketing, and management of service delivery options. (B.5.6)
  9. Participate in the documentation of ongoing processes for quality management and improvement (e.g., outcome studies analysis and client engagement surveys) (B.5.7)
  10. Implement program changes as needed to demonstrate quality of services. (B. 5.7)
  11. Define strategies for effective, competency-based legal and ethical supervision of occupational therapy assistants and non-occupational therapy personnel.(B.5.8)
  12. Discuss legal and ethical responsibilities (B.7.1)
  13. Describe options and ideas for personnel development (B.5.8)
  14. Demonstrate knowledge of various reimbursement systems and funding mechanisms (e.g., federal, state, third party, private payer) (B.4.29)
  15. Recognize treatment/diagnosis codes (e.g., CPT®, ICD, DSM® codes) (B.4.29)
  16. Demonstrate understanding of billing codes for occupational therapy services (B.4.29)
  17. Articulate and practice documentation requirements that affect consumers and the practice of occupational therapy (B.4.29)
  18. Recognized that documentation must effectively communicate the need and rationale for occupational therapy services. (B.4.29)
  19. Define the systems and structures that create federal and state legislation and regulations, and their implications and effects on persons, groups, and populations, as well as practice on persons, groups, and populations, as well as practice. (B. 5.4)
  20. Recognize the OTA role in providing care and programs that demonstrate knowledge of applicable national requirements for credentialing and requirements for licensure, certification, or registration consistent with federal and state laws.(B. 5.5)
  21. Demonstrate knowledge of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and AOTA Standards of Practice and use them as a guide for ethical decision-making in professional interactions, client interventions, employment settings, and when confronted with personal and organizational ethical conflicts. (B 7.1)
  22. Demonstrate knowledge of personal and professional responsibilities related to liability issues under current models of service provision. (B.7.5)
  23. Demonstrate knowledge of the varied roles of the occupational therapy assistant providing service on a contractual basis. (B.7.5)
  24. Locate and demonstrate understanding of professional literature, including the quality of the source of information, to make evidence-based  practice decisions in collaboration with the occupational therapist (B.6.1)
  25. Explain how scholarly activities and literature contribute to the development of the profession. (B.6.1)
  26. Understand the difference between quantitative and qualitative research studies. (B. 6.2)
  27. Demonstrate the skills to understand a scholarly report. (B.6.3)
  28. Demonstrate knowledge of how the role of a professional is enhanced by participating and engaging in local, national, and international leadership positions in organizations or agencies. (B.7.2)
  29. Promote occupational therapy by educating other professionals, service providers, consumers, third-party payers, regulatory bodies, and the public. (B.7.3)
  30. Identify and develop strategies for ongoing professional development to ensure that practice is consistent with current and accepted standards (B.7.4)
  31. Demonstrate clinical reasoning to address occupation-based interventions, client factors, performance patterns, and performance skills. (B.4.2)
  32. Occupation-based intervention Utilize clinical reasoning to facilitate occupation-based interventions that address client factors. This must include interventions focused on promotion, compensation, adaptation, and prevention. (B.4.3)
  33. Contribute to the evaluation process of client(s)’ occupational performance, including an occupational profile, by administering standardized and non-standardized screenings and assessment tools and collaborating in the development of occupation-based intervention plans and strategies. (B.4.4)
  34. Demonstrate understanding that intervention plans, and strategies must be client centered, culturally relevant, reflective of current occupational therapy practice, and based on available evidence (B.4.4)
  35. Under the direction of an occupational therapist, collect, organize, and report on data for evaluation of client outcomes. (B.4.6)
  36. Implement a discharge plan from occupational therapy services that was developed by the occupational therapist in collaboration with the client and members of the inter-professional team by reviewing the needs of the client, caregiver, family, and significant others; available resources; and discharge environment. (B.4.28)
  37. Explain the role and responsibility of the practitioner to advocate for changes in service delivery policies, effect changes in the system, recognize opportunities in emerging practice areas, and advocate for opportunities to expand the occupational therapy assistant’s role. (B. 5.2)
  38. Understand and articulate care coordination, case management, and transition services in traditional and emerging practice environments. (B.4.20)
  39. Identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, families, communities and members of the inter-professional team in a responsive and responsible manner that supports a team approach to the promotion of health and wellness. (B.4.23)
  40. Demonstrate awareness of the principles of inter-professional team dynamics to perform effectively in different team roles to plan, deliver, and evaluate patient- and population-centered care as well as population health programs and policies that are safe, timely, efficient, effective, and equitable. (B. 4.25)

Fieldwork Objectives:

  1. Demonstrate professional behavior (positive rapport and appropriate courtesy and attitude with clients and staff, reliable work habits, attendance and timeliness, professional ethics, confidentiality, follow safety measures and standard precautions, etc.)
  2. Demonstrate, self-assess, and set professional development goals related to communication skills, including therapeutic rapport, & therapeutic use of self.
  3. Observe & participate in selected aspects of the occupational therapy process under supervision of the OT Fieldwork Educator in OT settings, or
  4. Observe & participate in selected aspects of the service delivery process under supervision of qualified personnel in non-OT settings.
  5. Reflect on the effects of psychological and social (including cultural and diversity) factors on the client’s engagement in occupation, in all aspects of the OT Process.
  6. Demonstrate good judgment in seeking assistance, and responding to feedback
  7. Meet all FW site specific objectives in timely fashion.
  8. Analyze the cumulative feedback on student performance to inform readiness for future fieldwork placement.

OTA 237 : Developmental/Pediatric OT Practice

Human development and the occupational therapy process in the treatment of developmental concerns are the foundational concepts of this course. Normal development of the infant and child is explored within the context of environmental, community, social, and cultural influences and is compared with delayed development. Students learn pediatric practice skills to address sensorimotor, cognitive, and psychosocial performance. The lab component incorporates theoretical principles and provides opportunities to develop assessment, intervention planning and implementation, and documentation skills. Students demonstrate adaptation of the environment, tools, materials, and occupations to meet the needs of the pediatric population. Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Fall, Day only

Credits

4

Prerequisites

  1. 1. Describe the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and its relationship to pediatric practice by explaining how performance skills, performance patterns, contexts, and environments influence the child’s performance in selected areas of occupation. (B.3.2)
  2. Describe major frames of reference and how they guide pediatric OT practice. (B.3.2, B2.1)
  3. Describe the benefits of using a family centered approach. (B.1.1)
  4. Identify the areas of pediatric occupational therapy practice from a lifespan perspective including neonates, intervention, and school practice and through adults with developmental disabilities. (B.1.1)
  5. Define the fundamentals of normal development related to major milestones and developmental stages and applies to children with special needs. (B.1.1) 
  6. Apply an understanding of normal development to children with special needs and/or atypical development to treatment that enhances performance skills and patterns. (B.1.1, B.4.2)
  7. Define client factors necessary for postural development, fine and gross motor skills, perception, augmentative communication, handwriting, mobility, sensory integration, feeding and oral motor skills, self-care and adaptations for independent living. (B.1.1, B.4.16)
  8. Define the differences between educational and medical models. (B.2.1)
  9. Describe the role of the COTA with pediatric and developmentally disabled diagnoses and the importance of incorporating age-appropriate activities into treatment. (B.4.24 and B.4.0)
  10. Describe therapeutic activities used to address problems related to ADLs & IADLs. (B.4.19)
  11. Select appropriate occupational therapy tools/methods for analyzing, grading, and adapting ADLs and IADLs. (B.4.9, B.4.16)
  12. Identify assistive technology and compensation strategies used in pediatric rehabilitation and developmental readiness for prosthetic care. (B.4.12)
  13. Identify effective ways to interact with parents, caregivers, clients, teachers etc. in a professional way through written, and electronic communications. (B.4.23)
  14. Describe home and school modifications, accommodations, and/or strategies, including the role of the OTA in the consultative process to encourage success in the classroom & at home including but not limited to computer keyboard intervention, postural control and positioning, sensory diet and adaptive equipment. (B.4.19, B.4.9)
  15. Explain how gender, age, race, socioeconomic and/or culture impact on intervention planning. (B.1.2)
  16. Under the direction of an occupational therapist determine tools/methods that are appropriate for assessment/intervention related to specific pediatric diagnosis including but not limited to: cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, sensory processing disorders, and other common pediatric conditions/disorders.(B.4.4, B.4.16)
  17. Demonstrate oral presentation skills via individual and/or group presentations. (B.4.23)
  18. Utilize professional literature, internet search engines, and/or databases to research topic(s) supporting clinical reasoning for the development of the assigned pediatric case study and respective in-class presentation. (B.4.23.) 
  19. Incorporate evidenced based practice used in research for the assigned pediatric case study class presentation defining how it impacts intervention outcomes. (B.4.23, B.6.3)

OTA 241 : Level II Occupational Therapy Clinical Practice - A

The student will be assigned to a psychiatric, long term care or alternate agency under the supervision of a Registered Occupational Therapist or Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant. The student will be given the opportunity to apply his/her knowledge and skills to occupational therapy practice in sensorimotor, cognitive and/or psychosocial performance areas. Students will actively participate in a collaborative and supervisory relationship and experience being a part of the rehabilitation team. 8 week, full-time placement. Spring, Day only

Credits

5

Prerequisites

  1. Student will demonstrate understanding and practice the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Code of Ethic and all state and facility regulations such as Medicare, Medicaid, client privacy (HIPAA/FERPA) and social media.
  2. Student will observe and demonstrate safety regulations specific to facility or agency which may include fire safety, OSHA regulations, universal precautions and emergency procedures. Student will report document incidents appropriately.
  3. Student will use sound judgement regarding safety of self and others during all fieldwork-related activities anticipating potential unsafe situations and engages in preventative measures.
  4. Student will express the values, beliefs, and distinct perspective of the occupational therapy profession to clients and other relevant parties clearly, confidently and accurately.
  5. Student will communicate the value of occupation as a method and desired outcome of occupational therapy to clients and other relevant parties, clearly, confidently and accurately.
  6. Student will convey the role of the occupational therapy practitioner to clients when other relevant parties clearly, confidently, and accurately.
  7. Student will contribute throughout the evaluation process by demonstrating the ability to obtain sufficient and necessary data/information from various sources, regarding factors that support and hinder occupational performance.
  8. Student will administer assessments accurately and efficiently resulting in findings that are valid, reliable and timely to demonstrate service competence in assessment methods, per setting procedures and applicable laws.
  9. Student will administer delegated standardized, non-standardized, interviews and observations, assessments using appropriate procedures and protocols.
  10. Student will assist with interpretation of information through record or chart review, observations, interviews and standardized and non- standardized assessments in relation to the client’s needs, factors, and performance.
  11. Student will report results clearly, accurately and concisely, reflecting the client’s occupational performance.
  12. Student will clearly and logically articulate rationale for the intervention process based on the evaluation results as well as considering contexts,  theories, frames of reference, practice models and evidence.
  13. Student will use professional literature to make informed intervention decisions under the supervision and in cooperation with the supervising occupational therapy practitioner.
  14. Student will select client-centered and occupation-based interventions with consideration of client-centered components that motivate and challenge the client to achieve established goals.
  15. Student will demonstrate the ability to implement client-centered and occupation based intervention plans.
  16. Student will consistently modify the task by upgrading or downgrading task and or environment to maximize client’s performance in client-centered and occupation-based intervention plans.
  17. Student will demonstrate the ability to recommend modifications or termination of the intervention plan based on the client’s status to the supervising occupational therapy practitioner.
  18. Student will clearly and concisely demonstrate the ability to document the client’s response to services in a manner that expresses the  effectiveness of interventions.
  19. Student through practice or discussion, will exhibit the ability to collaborate with and assign appropriate tasks to, as indicated, the occupational therapy aide or others to who responsibilities might be assigned.
  20. Student demonstrates through practice or discussion, an understanding of the costs and funding systems related to occupational therapy services, such as federal, state, third party and private payers for billing of OT services, inventory and ordering supplies and options for client procurement of adaptive equipment. 
  21. Student exhibits understanding of the mission, vision, accreditation status, licensing, and any related specialty certifications related to the fieldwork site/organization.
  22. Student consistently demonstrates the ability to meet the productivity standards or volume of work expected of occupational therapy assistant students.
  23. Student communicates verbally and nonverbally, clearly and effectively with all parties including but not limited to clients, families, caregivers, colleagues, service providers, administration and the public.
  24. Student’s documentation is consistently legible, uses appropriate grammar, spelling and punctuation and adheres to electronic health documentation requirement, or requirements of the specific setting to produce clear and accurate documentation.
  25. Student initiates communication, asks for feedback about performance, identifies own strengths and challenges by collaborating with fieldwork educator(s) to maximize the learning experience.
  26. Student takes responsibility for attaining professional competence by seeking out learning opportunities and interactions with fieldwork educator(s) and others.
  27. Student constructively reflects and responds to feedback in a timely manner.
  28. Student consistently exhibits punctuality, initiative, preparedness, flexibility, dependability and professional appearance, foundations of acceptable work behaviors.
  29. Student displays the ability to consistently plan ahead, adhere to schedules and complete work in expected timeframe for effective time management.
  30. Student, using therapeutic use of self, manages relationships effectively and adjusts their approach to meet the needs of clients and others.
  31. Student demonstrates respect for diversity factors including; one’s culture, socioeconomic status, beliefs and identify.

OTA 243 : Level II Occupational Therapy Clinical Practice - B

The student will be assigned to a second clinical agency under the supervision of a Registered Occupational Therapist or Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant. The student will be given the opportunity to apply his/her knowledge and skills to occupational therapy practice in sensorimotor, cognitive and/or psychosocial performance areas. Students will actively participate in a collaborative and supervisory relationship and experience being a part of the rehabilitation team. 8 week, full-time placement. Spring, Day only

Credits

5

Prerequisites

  1. Student will demonstrate understanding and practice the American Occupational Therapy Association’s Code of Ethic and all state and facility regulations such as Medicare, Medicaid, client privacy (HIPAA/FERPA) and social media.
  2. Student will observe and demonstrate safety regulations specific to facility or agency which may include fire safety, OSHA regulations, universal precautions and emergency procedures. Student will report document incidents appropriately.
  3. Student will use sound judgement regarding safety of self and others during all fieldwork-related activities anticipating potential unsafe situations and engages in preventative measures.
  4. Student will express the values, beliefs, and distinct perspective of the occupational therapy profession to clients and other relevant parties clearly, confidently and accurately.
  5. Student will communicate the value of occupation as a method and desired outcome of occupational therapy to clients and other relevant parties, clearly, confidently and accurately.
  6. Student will convey the role of the occupational therapy practitioner to clients when other relevant parties clearly, confidently, and accurately.
  7. Student will contribute throughout the evaluation process by demonstrating the ability to obtain sufficient and necessary data/information from various sources, regarding factors that support and hinder occupational performance.
  8. Student will administer assessments accurately and efficiently resulting in findings that are valid, reliable and timely to demonstrate service competence in assessment methods, per setting procedures and applicable laws.
  9. Student will administer delegated standardized, non-standardized, interviews and observations, assessments using appropriate procedures and protocols.
  10. Student will assist with interpretation of information through record or chart review, observations, interviews and standardized and non- standardized assessments in relation to the client’s needs, factors, and performance.
  11. Student will report results clearly, accurately and concisely, reflecting the client’s occupational performance.
  12. Student will clearly and logically articulate rationale for the intervention process based on the evaluation results as well as considering contexts, theories, frames of reference, practice models and evidence.
  13. Student will use professional literature to make informed intervention decisions under the supervision and in cooperation with the supervising occupational therapy practitioner.
  14. Student will select client-centered and occupation-based interventions with consideration of client-centered components that motivate and challenge the client to achieve established goals.
  15. Student will demonstrate the ability to implement client-centered and occupation based intervention plans.
  16. Student will consistently modify the task by upgrading or downgrading task and or environment to maximize client’s performance in client-centered and occupation-based intervention plans.
  17. Student will demonstrate the ability to recommend modifications or termination of the intervention plan based on the client’s status to the supervising occupational therapy practitioner.
  18. Student will clearly and concisely demonstrate the ability to document the client’s response to services in a manner that expresses the effectiveness of interventions.
  19. Student through practice or discussion, will exhibit the ability to collaborate with and assign appropriate tasks to, as indicated, the occupational therapy aide or others to who responsibilities might be assigned.
  20. Student demonstrates through practice or discussion, an understanding of the costs and funding systems related to occupational therapy services, such as federal, state, third party and private payers for billing of OT services, inventory and ordering supplies and options for client procurement of adaptive equipment.
  21. Student exhibits understanding of the mission, vision, accreditation status, licensing, and any related specialty certifications related to the fieldwork site/organization.
  22.  Student consistently demonstrates the ability to meet the productivity standards or volume of work expected of occupational therapy assistant students.
  23. Student communicates verbally and nonverbally, clearly and effectively with all parties including but not limited to clients, families, caregivers, colleagues, service providers, administration and the public.
  24. Student’s documentation is consistently legible, uses appropriate grammar, spelling and punctuation and adheres to electronic health  documentation requirement, or requirements of the specific setting to produce clear and accurate documentation.
  25. Student initiates communication, asks for feedback about performance, identifies own strengths and challenges by collaborating with fieldwork educator(s) to maximize the learning experience.
  26. Student takes responsibility for attaining professional competence by seeking out learning opportunities and interactions with fieldwork educator(s) and others.
  27. Student constructively reflects and responds to feedback in a timely manner.
  28. Student consistently exhibits punctuality, initiative, preparedness, flexibility, dependability and professional appearance, foundations of acceptable work behaviors.
  29. Student displays the ability to consistently plan ahead, adhere to schedules and complete work in expected timeframe for effective time  management.
  30. Student, using therapeutic use of self, manages relationships effectively and adjusts their approach to meet the needs of clients and others.
  31. Student demonstrates respect for diversity factors including; one’s culture, socioeconomic status, beliefs and identify.

OTA 244 : Seminar in Occupational Therapy

The seminar component addresses practice-related experiences and questions. The course provides opportunities to reflect and clarify ongoing fieldwork experiences. The application of didactic knowledge and laboratory experience along with an opportunity for clarification during the seminar component provides integration of the entire four semesters. Two lecture hours per week. Spring, Day only

Credits

2

Prerequisites

OTA 233, OTA 235, and OTA 237 or prior approval of the program director.

Corequisites

OTA 233, OTA 235, and OTA 237 or prior approval of the program director.

  1. Identify personal and professional abilities and competencies as they relate to job responsibilities by creating a resume and cover letter appropriate for an entry level OTA.
  2. Demonstrate effective interviewing techniques and strategize job search skills.
  3. Demonstrate collaboration, clinical reasoning and problem-solving skills during fieldwork-related discussions.
  4. Learn strategies to prepare for the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) Examination for the Certified OTA.
  5. Locate resources and initiate the application processes for national certification (NBCOT).
  6. Locate resources and initiate the application processes for state licensure in MA and/or RI.
  7. Additional outcomes based on program need.