OTA 111 : Introduction to Occupational Therapy

This course provides the foundations of occupational therapy (OT) principles and practice. OT practitioners apply core values, knowledge and skills to assist clients to engage in valued everyday activities (occupations) to support health and participation in life. The theoretical foundations, history, philosophical and ethical bases of the profession and its personnel are explored. The theoretical foundations, history, philosophical and ethical bases of the profession and its personnel are explored. The collaborative role of the Occupational Therapy Assistant and the Registered Occupational Therapist and the roles of the inter-professional team in the health care delivery system are explored. The effects of diverse contextual factors and environment on participation in occupations are a focus. The underlying principles of inter-professional collaboration, evidence-informed decision-making, and lifelong learning are firmly established. Labs include college success strategies, information literacy and preparation for fieldwork. Students clarify their personal values, learn core professional values, attitudes, and behaviors, develop communication skills and sensitivity to factors of culture and diversity in the delivery of OT services. Lecture hours include 15 hours of off-site observational fieldwork. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Competency met: First Year Experience (9.0) Fall

Prerequisites

Admission to the OTA program or prior approval of the program director.

Corequisites

BIO 234, HLT 101 or HLT 102. HLT 106 or MAA 101 may be substituted for this requirement.

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of human development throughout the lifespan, as expressed by an understanding of developmental tasks and meaningful occupations throughout the lifespan. B.1.1 (b)
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of concepts of human behavior derived from behavioral sciences, social sciences, and the science of occupation. B.1.1 (c)
  3. Explain the role of sociocultural, socioeconomic, and diversity factors, and lifestyle choices in contemporary society to meet the needs of persons, groups, and populations (e.g., principles of psychology, sociology, and abnormal psychology). B.1.2
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the social determinants of health for persons, groups, and populations with or at risk for disabilities and chronic health conditions. This includes an understanding of the epidemiological factors that impact the public health and welfare of populations. B.1.3
  5. Apply scientific evidence, theories, models of practice, and frames of reference that underlie the practice of occupational therapy to guide and inform interventions for persons, groups, and populations in a variety of practice contexts and environments. B.2.1
  6. Define the process of theory development and its importance to occupational therapy. B.2.2
  7. Apply knowledge of occupational therapy history, philosophical base, theory, and sociopolitical climate and their importance in meeting society’s current and future occupational needs as well as how these factors influence and are influenced by practice. B.3.1
  8. Demonstrate knowledge of and apply the interaction of occupation and activity, including areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, context(s) and environments, and client factors. B.3.2
  9. Explain to consumers, potential employers, colleagues, third-party payers, regulatory boards, policymakers, and the general public the distinct nature of occupation and the evidence that occupation supports performance, participation, health, and well-being. B.3.3
  10. Demonstrate knowledge of scientific evidence as it relates to the importance of balancing areas of occupation; the role of occupation in the promotion of health; and the prevention of disease, illness, and dysfunction for persons, groups, and populations. B.3.4
  11. Demonstrate knowledge of the effects of disease processes including heritable diseases, genetic conditions, mental illness, disability, trauma, and injury on occupational performance. B.3.5
  12. Demonstrate activity analysis in areas of occupation, performance skills, performance patterns, context(s) and environments, and client factors to implement the intervention plan. B.3.6
  13. Demonstrate sound judgment in regard to safety of self and others and adhere to safety regulations throughout the occupational therapy process as appropriate to the setting and scope of practice. B.3.7
  14. Demonstrate therapeutic use of self, including one’s?personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process in both individual and group interaction. B.4.1
  15. Demonstrate knowledge of the use of technology in practice, including electronic documentation systems, virtual environments (communication via computer, includes simulated real time or near time environments such as chat rooms, email, video conference, or computer-based data collection), and tele-health technology B.4.15
  16. Understand and demonstrate the principles of the teaching–learning process using educational methods and health literacy education approaches. (Future courses will require students to design activities and clinical training and instruction for the client, caregiver, family, significant others, and communities at the level of the audience.) B.4.21
  17. Identify occupational needs through effective communication with patients, families, communities, and members of the inter-professional team in a responsive and responsible manner that supports a team approach to the promotion of health and wellness. B.4.23
  18. Demonstrate effective intra professional OT/OTA collaboration to explain the role of the occupational therapy assistant and occupational therapist in the screening and evaluation process. B.4.24
  19. Demonstrate awareness of the principles of inter-professional team dynamics to perform effectively in differ-ent team roles to plan, deliver, and evaluate patient- and population-centered care as well as population health programs and policies that are safe, timely, efficient, effective, and equitable. B.4.25
  20. Identify and communicate to the occupational therapist the need to design community and primary care programs to support occupational performance for persons, groups, and populations. B.4.27.
  21. Factors, policy issues and social systems Identify and explain the contextual factors; current policy issues; and socioeconomic, political, geographic, and demographic factors on the delivery of occupational therapy services for persons, groups, and populations and social systems as they relate to the practice of occupational therapy, and explain the contextual factors; current policy issues; and socioeconomic, political, geographic, and demographic factors on the delivery of occupational therapy services for persons, groups, and populations and social systems as they relate to the practice of occupational therapy. B.5.1
  22. Explain the role and responsibility of the practitioner to advocate for changes in service delivery policies, effect changes in the system, recognize opportunities in emerging practice areas, and advocate for opportunities to expand the occupational therapy assistant’s role. The role and responsibility of the practitioner to advocate for changes in service delivery policies, effect changes in the system, recognize opportunities in emerging practice areas, and advocate for opportunities to expand the occupational therapy assistant’s role. B.5.2
  23. Demonstrate knowledge of the OT/OTA student supervision and the criteria to serve as a Fieldwork Educator. Define strategies for effective, competency-based legal and ethical supervision of occupational therapy assistants and non-occupational therapy personnel.
  24. Locate and demonstrate understanding of professional literature, including the quality of the source of in-formation, to make evidence-based practice decisions in collaboration with the occupational therapist. Explain how scholarly activities and literature contribute to the development of the profession. B.6.1
  25. Understand the principles of teaching and learning in preparation for work in an academic setting. B.6.6
  26. Demonstrate knowledge of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics and AOTA Standards of Practice and use them as a guide for ethical decision-making in professional interactions, client interventions, employment settings, and when confronted with personal and organizational ethical conflicts. B.7.1
  27. Professional Engagement - Demonstrate knowledge of how the role of a professional is enhanced by participating and engaging in local, national, and international leadership positions in organizations or agencies. B.7.2
  28. Promote occupational therapy by educating other professionals, service providers, consumers, third-party payers, regulatory bodies, and the public. B.7.3
  29. Identify and develop strategies for ongoing professional development to ensure that practice is consistent with current and accepted standards  B.7.4.
  30. Develop strategies for test taking including multi-select multiple choice questions.
  31. Understand and use a range of medical abbreviations.
  32. Decode a client progress note.
  33. Create a basic SOAP note.
  34. Demonstrate technical and informational literacy, including basic familiarity with hardware and software, word processing, use of the internet for research and email, and use of BCC Access and eLearning.
  35. Demonstrate professional behavior expected of a college student as outlined in the Bristol Community College Catalog & Student Handbook and OTA Program Policies.

Level 1 Observation Fieldwork Objectives

  1. Describe the range of occupational therapy service delivery models and frames of reference.
  2. Develop observation skills and basic analysis of observations.
  3. Observe and describe the role of occupational therapy practitioners and inter-professional team members
  4. Recognize and reflect on the effects of psychological, social, cultural, and diversity factors on clients’ participation in occupation
  5. Create an occupational profile, and basic intervention plan, incorporating the effects of psychological and social (including cultural and diversity) factors on the client’s engagement in occupation into all aspects of the OT Process-evaluation, intervention and outcomes.
  6. Observe various communication styles and report on the effects of each on therapeutic rapport with clients
  7. Demonstrate therapeutic communication skills (active listening, rephrasing, congruent verbal and non-verbal skills, and sensitivity to factors of culture and diversity) 43. Recognize and utilize basic medical language and occupational therapy terminology 44. Demonstrate professional behavior (professional ethics, confidentiality, observation of safety measures & standard precautions, timeliness, professional development, etc.)

Overview

Subject

Credits

4
Instructional support fee applies.

Degrees/Certificates That Require Course