Fire Science

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

FIR 111 : Introduction to Fire Protection

This course provides an overview to fire protection and emergency services; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; culture and history of emergency services; fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services; fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and physics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics; life safety initiatives. Three class hours a week. (FESHE Approved) Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Illustrate and explain the history and culture of the fire service.
  2. Analyze the basic components of fire as a chemical chain reaction, the major phases of fire, and examine the main factors that influence fire spread and behavior.
  3. Differentiate between fire service training and education and explain the value of higher education to the professional fire service.
  4. List and describe the major organizations that provide emergency response service and illustrate how they interrelate.
  5. Identify fire protection and emergency-service careers in both the public and private sector.
  6. Define the role of national, state, and local support organizations in fire and emergency services.
  7. Discuss and describe the scope, purpose, and organizational structure of fire and emergency services.
  8. Describe the common types of fire and emergency service facilities, equipment, and apparatus.
  9. Compare and contrast effective management concepts for various emergency situations.
  10. Identify the primary responsibilities of fire prevention personnel including code enforcement, public information, and public and private protection systems.
  11. Recognize the components of career preparation and goal setting.
  12. Describe the importance of wellness and fitness as it relates to emergency services.

FIR 113 : Fundamentals of Fire Prevention

This course provides fundamental knowledge relating to the field of fire prevention. Topics include; history and philosophy of fire prevention; organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau; use and application of codes and standards; plans review; fire inspections; fire and life safety education; and fire investigation. Fall, Spring (FESHE Approved)

Credits

3
  1. Define national fire problem and the role of fire prevention.
  2. Identify and describe fire prevention organizations and associations.
  3. Define laws, rules, regulations, and codes and identify those relevant to fire prevention of the “authority having jurisdiction”.
  4. Define the functions of a fire prevention bureau.
  5. Describe inspection practices and procedures.
  6. Identify and describe the standards for professional qualifications for Fire Marshal, Plans Examiner, Fire Inspector, Fire and Life Safety Educator and Fire Investigator.
  7. List opportunities in professional development for fire prevention personnel.
  8. Describe the history and philosophy of fire prevention.

FIR 150 : Fire Investigation

This course will cover the fire/arson problem, responsibility for investigation, laws, motives, insurance, chemistry, cause determination, evidence, interview, reports, court presentation, and fire/arson prevention. Profiles of fire setters will also be studied, including the juvenile fire setter. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate the importance of documentation, evidence collection, and scene security process needed for successful resolution
  2. Understand and demonstrate the process of conducting fire origin and cause
  3. Identify the processes of proper documentation
  4. Identify the responsibilities of a firefighter when responding to the scene of a fire, including scene security and evidence preservation
  5. Describe the implications of constitutional amendments as they apply to fire investigations
  6. Identify key case law decisions that have affected fire investigations
  7. Explain the basic elements of fire dynamics and how they affect cause determination
  8. Compare the types of building construction on fire progression
  9. Describe how fire progression is affected by fire protection systems and building design
  10. Discuss the basic principles of electricity as an ignition source
  11. Recognize potential health and safety hazards
  12. Describe the process of conducting investigations using the scientific method
  13. Explain the procedures used for investigating vehicle fires
  14. Identify the characteristics of an incendiary fire and common motives of the fire setter

FIR 157 : Leadership and Command

This course assists fire company officers and potential fire company officers and firefighters for supervisory functions of command, planning, organizing, staffing, directing and fire ground control leadership and command procedures. This course is intended to give the student an insight into being an effective fire company officer with emphasis on leadership qualifications and effective command procedures. Competency met: Ethical Dimensions (7.0) Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Prepare future firefighters to assume responsibilities that are required for a command position in the fire service
  2. Prepare firefighters and fire officers to assume leadership roles in the fire service
  3. Prepare firefighters and fire officers in classic supervisory functions of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and fire ground control procedures
  4. Prepare fire officers in communications, i.e., they must be able to listen as well as give directions – becoming aware of contemporary concerns of human relations
  5. Prepare fire officers to exercise increased emphasis on Professional Development, the health and safety of the individual under their command
  6. Prepare fire officers on their legal responsibilities to the general public and to the individuals under their command
  7. Prepare fire officers to teach, instruct, and guide individuals under their command
  8. Prepare fire officers in enforcing department rules and regulations and have a detail knowledge of disciplinary procedures
  9. Demonstrate the basic views of leadership and various leadership styles
  10. Instruct fire officers in the elements of management particularly the position in middle management
  11. Prepare fire officers in their task as organizational motivators
  12. Prepare fire officers for the position in Incident Command procedures require during fire ground operations
  13. Prepare fire officers in the procedures for problem-solving
  14. Raise the level of competence of fire officers at the time they are promoted to a new position
  15. Prepare the firefighter to serve as a company officer prior to promotion rather than on the job training
  16. Prepare fire officers for further career development
  17. Prevent culture shock of an untrained manager being required to serve as a manager without the necessary skills
  18. Prepare the company officer to be a member of the management team and to support management and their discussion

FIR 159 : Building Construction for Fire Prevention

This course provides the components of building construction related to firefighter and life safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations and operating at emergencies. Three class hours a week. (FESHE Approved) Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Describe building construction as it relates to firefighter safety, building codes, fire prevention, code inspection, firefighting strategy, and tactics.
  2. Classify major types of building construction in accordance with a local/model building code.
  3. Analyze the hazards and tactical considerations associated with the various types of building construction.
  4. Explain the different loads and stresses that are placed on a building and their interrelationships.
  5. Identify the function of each principle structural component in typical building design.
  6. Differentiate between fire resistance and flame spread and describe the testing procedures used to establish ratings for each.
  7. Classify occupancy designations of the building code.
  8. Identify the indicators of potential structural failure as they relate to firefighter safety.
  9. Identify the role of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as it relates to building construction.

FIR 170 : Emergency Care I

This is the first part of a two-course sequence that enables the student to take the state of Massachusetts Emergency Medical Technicians Exam. Topics covered under this section include introduction to emergency care, medical/legal issues, basic life support CPR, infection control, anatomy and physiology, lifting and moving patients, airway management, and patient assessments. The class meets twice each week for 4 hours for half the semester. Fall, Spring

Credits

4
  1. Demonstrate the ability the ability to comprehend, apply, and evaluate the clinical information relative to the role of an entry-level Emergency Medical Technician (EMT).
  2. Demonstrate fundamental problem-solving skills in a basic pre-hospital environment.
  3. Demonstrate competence in performing basic pre-hospital assessment of the ill or injured victim in a professional manner.
  4. Identify critical traumatic patient conditions using standardized trauma patient assessments.
  5. Utilize effective communication skills.
  6. Demonstrate the knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of sudden illness or injury; and the mechanics of injury for patient evaluation.
  7. Summarize the medical equipment, safety equipment, and operations equipment carried on an ambulance.
  8. Demonstrate personal behaviors consistent with the professional standards and employer expectations for the entry level EMT.

FIR 171 : Emergency Care II

This is a continuation of FIR 170 covering the following topics: cardiac and respiratory emergencies, diabetic conditions, poisoning/overdoses/environmental emergencies, behavioral emergencies, allergies/anaphylactic shock, obstetrics, bleeding and shock issues, head and spine injuries, trauma skills, pediatric emergencies, and ambulance operations. The class meets twice each week for 4 hours for half the semester. Fall, Spring

Credits

4
  1. Demonstrate the ability to comprehend, apply, and evaluate the clinical information relative to the role of an entry-level Emergency Medical Technician (EMT).
  2. Demonstrate fundamental problem-solving skills in a basic pre-hospital environment.
  3. Demonstrate competence in performing basic pre-hospital assessment of the ill or injured victim in a professional manner.
  4. Identify critical traumatic patient conditions using standardized trauma patient assessments.
  5. Utilize effective communication skills.
  6. Demonstrate the knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of sudden illness or injury; and the mechanics of injury for patient evaluation.
  7. Summarize the medical equipment, safety equipment, and operations equipment carried on an ambulance.
  8. Demonstrate personal behaviors consistent with the professional standards and employer expectations for the entry-level EMT.

FIR 253 : Firefighting Tactics and Strategy

Techniques and procedures of firefighting with emphasis on the fire officer's role at the fire scene. Emphasis is placed on today's incident command system for successful control of firefighting personnel and equipment. Topics of discussion will include: methods of extinguishing fires in different types of buildings, life safety procedures, rekindling prevention, and overall fire ground objectives under the control of the incident commander. Three class hours a week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Create a strategy and implement appropriate tactics.
  2. Possess a working knowledge and execution of ICS/NIMS at the incident.
  3. Discuss fire behavior as it relates to strategies and tactics.
  4. Explain the main components of pre-fire planning and identify steps needed for a pre-fire plan review.
  5. Identify the basics of building construction and how they interrelate to pre-fire planning and strategy and tactics.
  6. Describe the steps taken during size-up.
  7. Examine the significance of fire ground communications.
  8. Identify the roles of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Management System (ICS) as it relates to strategy and tactics.

FIR 260 : Juvenile Fire Awareness

This course introduces students to the growing concern for children who are merely curious about fire, making a cry for help, or engaging in delinquent behavior. Evaluation techniques and intervention alternatives are identified and summarized for classification. Three lecture hours per week.

Credits

3
    Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:
  1. Recognize children who are curious about fires, making a cry for help or engaging in delinquent behavior.
  2. Demonstrate evaluation and intervention techniques
  3. Investigate background information from local, state and federal authorities
  4. Identify the many home situations and psychological/medical conditions that are related to firesetting
  5. Identify the procedure used to prosecute juveniles through the court system in order to obtain the legal and necessary outcomes for the children

FIR 261 : Fire Hydraulics

Hydraulic theory and principles in a classroom setting using formula calculations with reference to fireground rule of thumb application. Topics covered include: principles of water at rest; the theory of water in motion and under pressure; water distribution systems; pump testing and pump capacity; formulas to determine friction loss; and back pressure and forward pressure of water with relevance. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Apply water hydraulics principles.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of water hydraulics as it relates to fire protection.
  3. Apply the application of mathematics and physics to the movement of water in fire suppression activities.
  4. Identify the design principles of fire service pumping apparatus.
  5. Analyze community fire flow demand criteria.
  6. Demonstrate, through problem solving, a thorough understanding of the principles of forces that affect water, both at rest and in motion.
  7. List and describe the various types of water distribution systems.
  8. Discuss the various types of fire pumps.

FIR 262 : Fire & Emergency Safety & Survival

This course introduces the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emergency services. Three lecture hours per week. (FESHE Approved) Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Students will be able to:

  1. Define and describe the need for cultural and behavioral change within the emergency services relating to safety, incorporating leadership, supervision, accountability, and personal responsibility
  2. Explain the need for enchantments of personal and organizational accountability for health and safety
  3. Define how the concepts of risk management affect strategic and tactical decision-making
  4. Describe and evaluate circumstances that might constitute an unsafe act
  5. Explain the concept of empowering all emergency services personnel to stop unsafe acts
  6. Validate the need for national training standards as they correlate to professional development inclusive of qualifications, certifications, and re-certifications
  7. Defend the need for annual medical evaluations and the establishment of physical fitness criteria for emergency services personnel throughout their careers
  8. Explain the vital role of local departments in national research and data collection systems
  9. Illustrate how technological advancements can produce higher levels of emergency services, safety, and survival
  10. Explain the importance of investigating all near-misses, injuries, and fatalities
  11. Discuss how incorporating the lessons learned from investigations can support cultural change throughout the emergency services
  12. Describe how obtaining grants can support safety and survival initiatives
  13. Formulate an awareness of how adopting standardized policies for responding to emergency scenes can minimize near-misses, injuries, and death
  14. Explain how the increase in violent incidences impacts safety for emergency services personnel when responding to emergency scenes
  15. Recognize the need for counseling and psychological support services for personnel and their families, and identify access to local resources and services
  16. Describe the importance of public education as a critical component of life safety programs
  17. Discuss the importance of fire sprinklers and code enforcement
  18. Discuss the importance of safety in the design of apparatus and equipment

FIR 263 : Fire Protection Systems and Equipment

This course provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers. Three lecture hours per week. (FESHE Approved) Fall, Spring.

Credits

3

Students will be able to:

  1. Explain the benefits of fire protections systems in various types of structures
  2. Describe the basic elements of public water supply system including sources, distribution networks, piping, and hydrants
  3. Explain why water is a commonly used extinguishing agent
  4. Identify the different types and components of sprinkler, standpipe, and foam systems
  5. Review residential and commercial sprinkler legislation
  6. Identify the different types of non-water based fire suppression systems
  7. Explain the basic components of a fire alarm system
  8. Identify the different types of detectors and explain how they detect fire
  9. Describe the hazards of smoke and list the four factors that can influence smoke movement in a building
  10. Discuss the appropriate application of fire protection systems
  11. Explain the operation and appropriate application for the different types of portable fire protection systems