Chemistry

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

CHM 090 : Introduction to Chemistry

This course is designed for students who have not studied chemistry in high school or need a refresher introductory chemistry course. Topics under the description of CHM 111 will be covered, but somewhat less in depth. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer. Note: CHM 090 cannot be used to meet the General Education Science requirement nor does it carry degree credits. Grade points earned in this course will NOT be included in GPA calculations.

Credits

4
  1. Record and analyze scientific measurements.
  2. Classify and differentiate matter by composition and properties.
  3. Describe and explain atomic structure and its relationship to the periodic table.
  4. Identify and name compounds based upon the type of bonding and describe the process of ionic and covalent bond formation.
  5. Categorize and complete chemical reactions and represent them with balanced chemical equations.
  6. Explain relationships among moles, particles and mass and perform stoichiometric calculations using balanced chemical equations.

CHM 111 : General College Chemistry

This course in fundamentals of modern chemistry is for students not planning to major in science. Topics include the metric system, exponential notation, atomic structure, and the periodic table, the writing and use of chemical equations, stoichiometry of compounds and chemical reactions, the mole, chemical reactivity, properties of chemical bonds, solutions, and acids and bases. The laboratory component provides applications of concepts covered in lecture. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Competency Met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

C or better in high school science or CHM 090 and a C or better in high school algebra both within the last five years. Students who have not completed Algebra II in high school should complete the Intermediate Algebra Competency.

  1. Use the dimensional analysis method to make unit conversions in addition to making a scientific measurement.
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts about matter such as classification of matter, properties and changes of matter.
  3. Describe the structure of atoms and explain the relationship between the electronic structure of atoms and chemical periodicity.
  4. Classify, name, and write formulas of binary ionic, molecular compounds, and ions.
  5. Solve stoichiometric problems using balanced chemical equations.
  6. Calculate the mass percent and molarity of solutions given the necessary information.

CHM 113 : Fundamentals of Chemistry I

This course is designed for students majoring in science and engineering. Topics covered include scientific measurements and dimensional analysis, the structure of matter, chemical nomenclature, chemical formulas, chemical equations, mole and stoichiometry, thermochemistry, the gas laws, the quantum model of the atom, and periodicity of atomic properties. The laboratory component provides applications of concepts covered in lecture. Three class hours, one recitation hour and three laboratory hours a week. Competency Met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall, Spring.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

C or better in high school Chemistry or in CHM 090.

  1. Classify chemical substances as elements, compounds, or mixtures, recognize the names and formulas of pure substances, and perform calculations involving the mole concept.
  2. Accurately measure and record physical quantities such as mass, volume, length, etc. and analyze their data using techniques such as the method of dimensional analysis.
  3. Employ balanced chemical equations to solve stoichiometric problems.
  4. Perform calculations involving volume, temperature, pressure, and amount of gas using the correct gas laws.
  5. Carry out calculations involving amounts of reactants, products, and enthalpy of reaction.
  6. Explain the relationship between the electron configuration of elements and their chemical properties.

CHM 114 : Fundamentals of Chemistry II

Topics include theories of chemical bonding, intermolecular forces in solids and liquids, solutions and colligative properties, kinetics, equilibria, acids and bases, thermodynamics, and electrochemistry. The laboratory includes semimicroqualitative analysis along with traditional experimental procedures. Three class hours, one recitation hour, and three laboratory hours a week. Competency met: Scientific Reasoning and Discovery Fall, Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

C or better in CHM 113.

  1. Apply the Lewis Theory, Valence Bond Theory, and Molecular Orbital Theory to explain bonding in simple molecules and polyatomic ions.
  2. Use solute-solvent interactions to predict solubility and apply colligative properties of solutions to solve real life problems.
  3. Explain the factors that influence rates of reactions and calculate rates of reactions using kinetics data.
  4. Write equilibrium constant expressions and solve problems that require the use of principles of chemical equilibrium.
  5. Perform calculations involving Gibbs free energy, equilibrium constant, enthalpy and entropy.
  6. Balance redox reactions, calculate cell potentials and know the relationship between amount of electricity used and amount of product in an electrolysis experiment.

CHM 115 : Health Science Chemistry I

This course is designed for students in the health sciences. Topics include: a survey of measurements and the metric system; energy and matter; atomic structure and its relationship to chemical bonding; nomenclature; the periodic table; chemical reactivity; the mole and stochiometric relationships; a consideration of the gas laws; solutions (molarity and % concentration); chemical equilibrium; acids and bases with an emphasis on Bronsted theory, pH, and buffers. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Fall, Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

One year of high school biology and one year of high school chemistry.

  1. Classify matter based on physical state and composition and perform heat calculations using specific heat, mass, and change in temperature.
  2. Use the correct gas law to perform calculations involving volume, pressure, temperature, and amount of gas.
  3. Describe the structure of an atom and write electron configurations of atoms and ions.
  4. Write the correct names and chemical formulas of molecular and ionic compounds; employ balanced chemical equations to solve stoichiometric problems.
  5. Write equilibrium constant expressions and carry out calculations of equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products.
  6. Perform pH, pOH, [H+], [OH-] calculations and solve acid-base titration problems.

CHM 116 : Health Science Chemistry II

This course is a continuation of CHM 115. Topics include: an introduction to the chemistry of carbon; the hydrocarbons; organic functional groups (their structural and functional characteristics); the relationship of these functional groups to the chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic asids; protein synthesis; and metabolism. The metabolic pathways of fermentation, glycolysis, the citric acid cycle and the utilization of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins by these metabolic pathways are discussed. Three class hours and three laboratory hours a week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CHM 115 or its equivalent as determined by the department.

CHM 120 : Environmental Chemistry

A one semester course designed primarily for students in an environmental studies program. Topics covered will include areas of inorganic, organic and biochemistry as they pertain to environmental issues and pollution. The formation of toxic substances in the air, water and soil will be discussed including the methods of their formation and how to remedy the problems created by them. Current topics will be included such as acid precipitation, heavy metal deposition, pesticides, polymers (PCB, PVC, etc.) and thermal pollution. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

C or better in CHM 111, 112, 113, 114, or 116.

  1. Define Environmental Chemistry.
  2. Understand the movement of major chemical constituents through the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere and biosphere.
  3. Understand major sources, reactions, and fates of chemicals in the environment.
  4. Explain the energy balance on the earth, utilizing black body theory, albedo, and the greenhouse effect.
  5. Understand the electromagnetic spectrum and the relationships between wavelength, frequency and energy.
  6. Understand the effects of human technology on environmental systems.
  7. Perform analyses to determine levels of chemical constituents in soil and water.
  8. Determine the energy contents of fuels.
  9. Understand the processes utilized in producing energy from renewable sources.
  10. Distinguish between the major categories of plastics utilized in society for the purposes of recycling.

CHM 220 : Introductory Analytical Chemistry

This course is designed for students pursuing higher education in chemical sciences. Topics will include: Experimental measurements and tools used by analytical chemists; basic statistical tools and methods of determining and expressing experimental error; a review of chemical equilibrium and common titration methods in the context of specific applications; and a review of gravimetric analytical methods. Laboratory activities will be designed to re-enforce theories learned in lecture. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

C or better in CHM 111 or CHM 114.

Upon successful completion students will be able to:

  1. Apply the scientific method in solving problems of scientific nature.
  2. Explain the theoretical principles and important applications of classical analytical methods within titration and various techniques within gravimetric and coulometric methods.
  3. Prepare scientific reports from chemical experiments and do oral and written presentations.

CHM 225 : Biochemistry

This course covers the chemistry of biologically important molecules: amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Bioenergetics, biosynthesis, genes, chromosomes, and DNA metabolism round out the course. The lab introduces analytical and synthesis techniques for the biologically significant compounds. Three lecture hours and one laboratory hour per week. Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Biochemistry aims to describe the structure, organization, and functions of organisms in molecular terms. By the end of this course, you should be able to:

  1. Explain the physical and chemical properties of water and describe why water serves as the solvent for most biochemical reactions.
  2. Solve problems involving buffers and apply acid-base concepts to formulate buffer systems used in biochemical reactions.
  3. Distinguish the main chemical and biological differences between carbohydrates and lipids.
  4. Recognize the various functional groups found in amino acids and predict how they determine the secondary and tertiary structure of proteins.
  5. Describe the structure and mechanism of representative enzymes in biochemical pathways.
  6. Interpret plots of enzyme kinetic data.
  7. Describe the primary catabolic pathways of carbohydrates.
  8. Distinguish the key regulatory points, the energetics of the reactions, and the key chemical transformations involved in carbohydrate catabolism.

CHM 235 : Organic Chemistry I

Part one of a two-semester science majors level course on the facts and principles of chemistry as they apply to carbon-based compounds. The course has a mandatory lab that complements the lecture. Topics include re-emphasis of lab safety, mixture separation techniques; spectroscopy; Lewis, Valence and Molecular orbital bonding theory; representing organic compounds; acid-based theory; relationship between structure and properties including polarity, stability, acidity and physical properties; stereochemistry; nomenclature; patterns in the physical and chemical properties of aliphatic cyclic and acyclic alkanes, alkenes, alkyl halides and alcohols; applying the principles of thermodynamics, kinetics and mechanism to substitution, addition, redox and elimination reactions. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CHM 114 with a grade of C or better.

  1. Apply the basic principles that govern covalent bonding concepts to the structure of organic compounds including the octet rule, Lewis structures, formal charge, hybridization and resonance.
  2. Recognize families of organic compounds based on their functional groups, and apply nomenclature rules to draw formulas, structures, and write names or organic compounds.
  3. Explain the role of chemical structure, hybridization, resonance and inductive effects on acid/base strength, and apply acid/base theory to correlate structure and reactivity in the context of the reactions and mechanisms or organic compounds.
  4. Use molecular and/or computational models, structural drawings, and proper terminology to describe the conformations of alkanes and cycloalkanes, to distinguish stable versus reactive molecular conformations, and to explain chemical reactivity.
  5. Apply the concepts of isomerism and chirality in organic chemistry, draw Fischer projections, recognize and assessing configurations.
  6. Apply the knowledge of functional group reactivity to propose reasonable mechanisms to predict and explain the outcome of a reaction, relative reactivity and stereochemistry.

CHM 236 : Organic Chemistry II

Part two of a two-semester science majors level course on the facts and principles of chemistry as they apply to carbon-based compounds. The course has a mandatory lab that complements the lecture. Topics include re-emphasis of lab safety; synthetic techniques; spectroscopy; patterns in the nomenclature, structure, physical properties, spectra; reactivity; stability, stereochemistry and chemical reactions of conjugated systems, benzene and its derivatives, aromatic systems, ethers, carbonyls, amines, carboxylic acids, esters, amides; acid chlorides; anhydrides; nitriles,enols, steroids, lipids, carbohydrates and amino acids; applying the principles of thermodynamics, kinetics and reaction mechanisms to the substitution addition, redox, condensation and elimination reactions of these compounds. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CHM 235 with a grade of C or better.

  1. Recognize families of organic compounds based on their functional groups, and apply nomenclature rules to draw formulas, structures, and write names of organic compounds
  2. Apply the concepts of isomerism and chirality in organic chemistry, draw Fischer projections, recognize and assessing configurations.
  3. Apply knowledge of functional group reactivity to propose reasonable mechanisms for basic organic chemistry reactions, and apply knowledge of reaction mechanisms to predict and explain the outcome of a reaction, relative reactivity and stereochemistry
  4. Explain the concept of aromaticity and determine if a compound is aromatic, anti-aromatic or non-aromatic
  5. Describe the techniques of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectrometry, Infrared spectroscopy, and Mass Spectroscopy, and use spectroscopic data to determine molecular structures
  6. Plan multi-step synthesis of organic compounds using retrosynthetic analysis and functional group interconversions