American Sign Language

Classes

ASL 101 : Elementary American Sign Language I

This beginning course introduces students to American Sign Language (ASL), the language used by the American Deaf community and parts of Anglophone Canada. Students focus on developing visual-spatial orientation, using their face and body expressively, and learning basic vocabulary and grammar necessary to converse in ASL. Lessons are presented in a meaningful/functional context. Receptive (what you understand) skills are emphasized; however, expressive (what/how you sign) skills are practiced as well. Cultural aspects of the Deaf community are explored through literature and community events. Three class hours and one language lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
  1. Exchange information in American Sign Language about everyday life, such as routines, family and school.
  2. Establish a visual-spatial foundation.
  3. Exhibit and discuss ASL community values and behaviors.
  4. Demonstrate understanding and awareness that ASL has a distinct grammar and community of users and is not simply “English on the hands.”
  5. Practice successful ASL active-learning/listening behaviors.

ASL 102 : Elementary American Sign Language II

A continuation of ASL 101, this course continues student development of visual-spatial orientation, face and body expression, vocabulary and grammar. Lessons are presented in a meaningful/functional context. Analysis of expressive (what/ how you sign) skills is explored, however, receptive (what you understand) skills are emphasized. Cultural aspects of the Deaf community are explored through literature and community events. Prerequisite: ASL 101. Three class hours and one lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3
  1. Sustain conversations and/or present information in American Sign Language.
  2. Create, perform and digitally record original narratives, as well as re-telling of narrative models.
  3. Examine the self-perceptions and identity formation of culturally Deaf individuals.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of ASL syntax.
  5. Practice successful ASL active-learning behaviors.

ASL 181 : Visual/Gestural Communication

This seminar provides students with a foundation in the visual/gestural skills necessary for acquiring American Sign Language. Students engage in activities that promote visual-spatial awareness, gestural awareness and visual processing skills. One lecture hour and one laboratory hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 1 credit Spring

Credits

1
  1. Effectively communicate ideas and/or supplement a signed or spoken message using visual-gestural techniques.
  2. Explain the difference between gesture and ASL to anyone in layman's terms.
  3. Engage in appropriate gestural communication in society and the workplace that demonstrates communication sensitivity with non-English speakers when required.

ASL 201 : Intermediate American Sign Language I

This course focuses on further developing and refining basic receptive and expressive American Sign Language skills, and visual-spatial orientation acquired in ASL 101 and ASL 102. More complex vocabulary and grammar are presented in context and figurative language introduced. Expressive skills will be stressed. To further develop receptive and expressive competence, students are expected to attend community events and/or perform community service in an American Sign Language environment. Prerequisite: ASL 102 with a grade of C or better. Three class hours and one lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
  1. Comprehend intermediate ASL I expressions receptively.
  2. Express themselves accurately at an intermediate ASL I level.
  3. Analyze and react to their experiences in the Deaf community and their language development.
  4. Demonstrate understanding that ASL is a complex language in class discussion, exams and papers.
  5. Recognize the Deaf community as a cultural/linguistic minority in class discussion, exams and papers.

ASL 202 : Intermediate American Sign Language II

This course is a continuation of ASL 201. This course further develops and refines the receptive and expressive American Sign Language skill, visual-spatial orientation, vocabulary, figurative language, and complex syntax acquired in ASL 101, ASL 102, and ASL 201. The course stresses expressive skills. Students are expected to attend community events and/or perform community service in an American Sign Language environment to further develop receptive and expressive competence. Prerequisite: ASL 201 with a grade of C or better. Three class hours and one lab hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 3 credits Spring

Credits

3

ASL 284 : ASL/Deaf Studies Capstone Seminar

This is the capstone course for all Deaf Studies degree options. By course's end, students will demonstrate they have met program outcomes by completing the Deaf Studies/ASL portfolio. Students are also expected to develop and reflect on their individual culminating project (based on their chosen career path and plans). Prerequisites: ASL 201, ASL 181, DST 101, and DST 110. Pre or co-requisites: ASL 202, DST 151 and/or DST 252. One class hour and one lab hour per week. 1 credit Spring

Credits

1
  1. Demonstrate that they have met program outcomes via an e-portfolio shared with the college campus, planning and implementing two events, and completing individual service and research projects.
  2. Further develop skills and knowledge that are necessary for becoming an educated person, skills you can take with you into other classes, transfer and the workforce.

ASL 285 : Community-based Learning in Deaf Studies

Students develop and demonstrate their understanding of professionalism and engage in American Sign Language and Deaf cultural norms through community-based learning and community engagement. Students are immersed in a professional environment serving the Deaf/Hard-of-hearing community. Requirements include: four to six hours weekly in a non-paid, supervised, community-based learning site, and an orientation followed by three seminar meetings with the program director and cohort for guided reflection, discussions, and readings related to these experiences. Course should be taken during the final semester of any Deaf Studies degree program. Co-requisite: ASL 284. One lecture hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 1 credit Spring

Credits

1
  1. Compare and contrast hearing professional environments with Deaf professional environments.
  2. Report an increased level of comfort signing with native signers.
  3. Identify areas within their sign language skills that they need to further work on.
  4. Cite a professional reference that can be listed on a college application or resume.
  5. Identify agencies and schools in their area that service the Deaf/HH community engagement.

ASL 301 : Advanced American Sign Language I

This course further develops and refines the American Sign Language receptive and expressive skills and visual-gestural skills acquired in ASL 101 - ASL 202 to ensure discourse competency. This course builds the student's lexical base to include sign variations found across regions, ethnicities and generations. The course introduces formal and informal narrative styles. Students engage in a more intense study of the non-manual, linguistic features found in ASL as well as more sophisticated communication and narration, in general. This course is conducted entirely in ASL. Students are required to engage in ASL or Deaf cultural events as part of this course. Prerequisite: ASL 202 with a C or better. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 4 credits Fall

Credits

4

ASL 302 : Advanced American Sign Language II and Structure

This course is a continuation of ASL 301. The course builds on the skills examined and practiced in AMS 21 and provides an intense study and application of advanced American Sign Language competencies. This course also provides a survey of the linguistic structure of ASL particularly its phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. This course is conducted entirely in ASL. Expressive and receptive abilities are enhanced and practiced in native/immersion environments. Prerequisite: ASL 301 with a C or better. Three class hours and two lab hours per week. Gen. Ed. Competencies Met: Human Expression. 4 credits Spring

Credits

4