Sociology

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

SOC 101 : Principles of Sociology

This is an introductory course which presents the basic processes of human interaction and the concepts which describe their operation in everyday life. It studies the impact of culture, how we learn and conform to culture, and why deviance occurs. Principles of group behavior and social organization are viewed in the context of American culture and subcultures. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Global Awareness (5.2), Social Phenomenon (5.4), Ethical Dimensions (7.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the college's reading and writing placement tests or a C or better or concurrent enrollment in ENG 091 or ENG 092

  1. Identify fundamental concepts, theories and language comprising the discipline of Sociology.
  2. Recognize and understand the social structural bases of human and organizational behavior.
  3. Investigate and practice the meaning of sociological imagination.
  4. Demonstrate critical thinking skills through the study of sociological phenomena.

SOC 212 : The Sociology of Social Problems

This course focuses on the structure and dimensions of social problems confronting populations both in the United States and across the globe. Emphasis is placed on the problems of global poverty, work and unemployment, gender and racial inequities, environmental degradation, crime and drug addictions, disease and health care delivery, civil conflicts, and terrorism. The course attempts to understand the social structural causes of these problems and explores potential solutions. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Global Awareness (5.2), Social Phenomenon (5.4), Ethical Dimensions (7.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the college's reading and writing placement tests, or a C or better or concurrent enrollment in ENG 091 or ENG 092

  1. Explain the sociological understanding of ways in which social structures create, maintain and exacerbate social problems.
  2. Analyze the interrelationships between and among social problems, particularly those of a global nature and the ways in which they impact national and local social problems.
  3. Advocate for a milieu that encourages civic and global awareness, empowerment of citizenship and identity, and civic participation and action.
  4. Analyze social structures and the ways in which they impact personal lives and communities.

SOC 216 : Food, Famine, and Farming in the Global Village

This course analyzes the social-structural forces that shape the global food system with particular focus on societal problems emanating from the fossil-fuel-based, industrial agricultural model that now dominates world-wide food production, distribution, and consumption. Areas covered include a historical overview of subsistence strategies, the Green Revolution, threats to food security and water access, first-world obesity and third-world famine, the impact on food systems due to climate change and fossil fuel depletion, population swells, food-based social movements, and alternative food systems. Three hours of lecture per week. Fall

Credits

3
  1. Understand humankind’s ties to and dependence on the natural world.
  2. Identify social structural forces which shape the most basic experiences of daily life, with food as the core subject.
  3. Develop a global awareness of the intricate and complex systems which bind humankind across nations and borders.
  4. Engage in critical thinking and problem solving, especially regarding food within the context of climate change and resource depletion.

SOC 251 : Sociology of the Family

This course explores the various forms of contemporary family constructs with an emphasis on the social forces that impact family life. Micro-level psycho-social issues include sexual identity and orientation, courtship patterns, mate selection, role expectations and family planning practices. Macro-level socio-political economic factors include economic transformations, contemporary employment patterns, variation in family structures, childcare and childbearing issues, elder family member issues, and domestic violence. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the college's reading and writing placement tests or a C or better or concurrent enrollment in ENG 091 or ENG 092

  1. Upon completion of this course, students will:
  2. Develop a historical and cross-cultural analysis of contemporary family structures.
  3. Examine the intersection of race, age, social class, gender, and sexual orientation on family life and roles.
  4. Identify significant stages and processes in the family life cycle.
  5. Critically analyze the social, economic and policy factors that shape family systems.

SOC 252 : The Sociology of Human Relations

This course explores the social-structural, social-psychological, and socio-political dimensions of human relations evolving in the midst of rapid social transformations occurring throughout the contemporary world. Focus is placed on the changing character of human relations within the context of work, family, and civil society as traditional social patterns give way to globalization. Potential developments of future societies and patterns of interaction are explored. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Global Awareness (5.2), Social Phenomenon (5.4), Ethical Dimensions (7.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the college's reading and writing placement tests, or a C or better or concurrent enrollment in ENG 091 or ENG 092.

  1. Compare and contrast the social-structural, social-psychological and socio-political dimensions of human relations in a globalized world.
  2. Identify historical and contemporary social forces creating rapid cross-cultural change.
  3. Decipher ways in which the changing character of human relations is occurring.
  4. Examine social structural and socio-economic impacts on human relations.

SOC 253 : Environmental Sociology: Ecology and the Built Environment

This course is a survey course of contemporary environmental and social science theory, research and data analysis. It explores the social construction of reality, the role of the corporate and social media, as well as, public policy formation and its consequences for humanity, civilization and the biosphere. The course concludes with an analysis of creative responses to environmental crises and their impact in human consciousness, education, science, culture, society, social movements, social change, human rights, environmental, social and economic justice, and revolution. It explores alternatives to the old infinite growth model of economics and social organization. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the college's reading and English placement tests or C or better or concurrent enrollment in ENG 091, or ENG 092

  1. Explain the historical sociocultural, economic, political and scientific processes that led to the current environmental crises.
  2. Analyze the summary, interpretation, and explanation of empirical data. 
  3. Assess the possible outcomes of different policy decisions including their potential impact on their own lives, their community, and civilization as a whole.
  4. Demonstrate they have integrated ecological principles and concepts that foster a more ecologically grounded world view into their knowledge base.
  5. Produce individual and collective action plans for dealing with the crises of civilization.
  6. Invent individual and social coping strategies.

SOC 254 : Alcohol Use and Abuse

This course provides the student with a basic understanding of the nature of alcoholism and the problems it generates for alcoholics and their families. It also analyzes the kinds of social pressures that affect the development of alcoholism. Students are introduced to text materials and audiovisual presentations on the subject and participate in actual visits to agencies such as halfway houses and detoxification units that provide services to alcoholics and their families. Three lecture hours per week. Spring

Credits

3
  1. Identify characteristics that distinguish among the conditions of alcohol use, abuse and alcoholism, both in the United States and cross-culturally.
  2. Recognize the problems these conditions generate for subjects and their families, friends and the larger community.
  3. Critically analyze research on societal conditions and social pressures leading to alcohol use, abuse and alcoholism.
  4. Demonstrate familiarity with programs focused on education, prevention and treatment.

SOC 256 : Race and Ethnicity in the Contemporary United States

This course explores the social structural forces and the psycho-social dynamics influencing contemporary U.S. race and ethnic relations, cultural identities, and cross-cultural perceptions. Particular emphasis is on social inequality in education, work, income, housing, healthcare, the media, sports, crime and the judicial system. Groups of particular interest included Native Americans, African Americans, Asian American and Latino Americans. Additionally, issues of immigrant and refugee populations dislocated due to poverty, environmental stresses and civil disorders are examined. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Multicultural Perspective, Social Phenomenon, Ethical Dimensions. Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Prerequisites

A passing score on the College's reading and writing placement tests or a C or better or concurrent enrollment in ENG 091 or ENG 092

  1. Upon completion of this course, students will:
  2. Evaluate race and ethnicity as socially constructed categories and explore how these categories are created and maintained.
  3. Analyze racial and ethnic inequalities as structural rather than as individual phenomena.
  4. Identify the ways in which race and ethnicity intersect with social class and gender.
  5. Critically analyze the social, economic, environmental and policy factors that shape the systems of racial/ethnic inequalities.

SOC 257 : Social Issues in Loss

This course is designed to address social issues which are impacting loss experiences such as divorce and single parenting problems, child abuse, aging issues and losses, pet death, disability, disfigurement, disenfranchisement, rape, alcoholism, unemployment, euthanasia and new trends in technology which are bringing about new losses. The ethnic, cultural and religious customs and traditions which are employed to deal with loss will also be discussed. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Multicultural Perspective (5.3), Ethical Dimensions (7.0) Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to identify:

  1. Issues related to various death and non-death losses.
  2. New trends in technology and lifestyle that create new types of losses. 
  3. The diversity of expression in responding to death and dying losses.

SOC 258 : Topics in Sociology

A one-semester course on a specific topic in sociology. Topic to be announced each semester. Three lecture hours per week. Competency met: Social Phenomenon (5.4) Not offered every year

Credits

3

Prerequisites

  1. Define terminology specific to the topics discussed
  2.  Apply course materials to real world scenarios
  3. Identify key concepts connected to topic
  4. Evaluate arguments about the course theme

SOC 262 : Social Issues in Aging

This course actively engages the student with a myriad of issues in the aging process with on-site programs at service agencies and presentations by senior care representatives. An in-depth study of the social trends effecting lifestyles examines such issues as senior living arrangement, health care programs and benefits, senior organizations and community services, elder abuse and seniors as victims of crime, stress factors, legal and end-of-life issues as well as profiles of the three aging stages with specific concerns and required responses. The course also examines career opportunities for senior assistance and guidelines for care management. Three lecture hours per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Students will have a comprehensive knowledge of the Gerontology/Geriatric glossary of terms and theories, the holistic nature and problems encountered in the aging process, the myriad legislative benefits/advocacy/protections as well as social/health/agencies for support.
  2. The student will gain a skill and competency to explain clearly information required for seniors, to offer coping strategies and enlighten seniors to the challenges and choices amidst the social trends which are currently affecting their lifestyles.
  3. Because of the great deal of affective learning in the course, the student will have gained a sensitivity to all senior issues and concerns to better understand their role as facilitators.

SOC 263 : Senior Life - Choices and Challenges

This course offers an in-depth examination of a variety of resources available for seniors to live a healthy, happy, and satisfying life. The student is introduced to the numerous community organizations, activities, and educational opportunities that can engage seniors. The course addresses the new challenges of grandparenting, lifestyles, technology, and anti-aging therapies as well as preparation modes for the baby-boomer generation. The course includes a fun activity of role playing senior values and interests and a "Life Review" project of a selected family senior. Three hours of lecture per week. Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Students will have a comprehensive knowledge of the Gerontology/Geriatric glossary of terms and theories, the holistic nature and problems encountered in the aging process, the myriad legislative benefits/advocacy/protections as well as social/health/agencies for support.
  2. The student will gain a skill and competency to explain clearly information required for seniors, to offer coping strategies and enlighten seniors to the challenges and choices amidst the social trends which are currently affecting their lifestyles.
  3. Because of the great deal of affective learning in the course, the student will have gained a sensitivity to all senior issues and concerns to better understand their role as facilitators.