Health

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

HLT 101 : Medical Language Module I

A one-semester, one-credit course to introduce students to the language used in the medical and allied health professions. Word building using medical word roots, prefixes and suffixes is the primary emphasis of the course. Terms that identify diseases, disorders and conditions as well as diagnostic tests and treatment procedures are taught. The terms relate to the function and anatomy of the overall body structure and the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. Pronunciation is emphasized to facilitate the learner's communication with other members of the healthcare delivery team. Prerequisite: High school biology or permission of instructor. One lecture hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 1 credit Fall

Credits

1

HLT 102 : Medical Language Module II

A one-semester, one-credit course to introduce students to the language used in the medical and allied health professions. Word building using medical word roots, prefixes and suffixes is the primary emphasis of the course. Terms that identify diseases, disorders and conditions as well as diagnostic tests and treatment procedures are taught. The terms relate to the function and anatomy of the integumentary, respiratory and cardiovascular/lymphatic systems. Pronunciation is emphasized to facilitate the learner's communication with other members of the healthcare delivery system. Prerequisite: High school biology or permission of instructor. Onelecture hour per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 1 credit Spring

Credits

1
1. Word building using medical word roots, prefixes and suffixes is the primary emphasis of the course. 2. Terms that identify diseases, disorders and conditions as well as diagnostic tests and treatment procedures are taught. 3. The terms relate to the function and anatomy of the integumentary, respiratory and cardiovascular/lymphatic systems. 4. Pronunciation is emphasized to facilitate the learner's communication with other members of the healthcare delivery system.

HLT 106 : Medical Language

This course is an introduction to the language used in the medical and allied health professions. Terms that identify diseases, disorders and conditions as well as diagnostic and treatment procedures are introduced and correlated to the function and anatomy of the various body systems. Pronunciation is emphasized. Students learn word building, commonly used abbreviations, and the use of medical dictionaries and other reference materials. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 3 credits Fall

Credits

3
  1. Identify the major components of medical terms, including prefix, suffix, and root.
  2. Apply the principles of building medical terms using the major component of prefix, suffix, and word root.
  3. Spell, pronounce, and define medical terms.
  4. Identify work parts and correctly use the term to complete a statement.
  5. Analyze medical terms and categorize by body systems.
6. Apply the rules for using singular and plural endings.

HLT 112 : Nurse Aide Training

The course prepares students for employment opportunities in nursing homes, home care, and hospitals. Nurse Aide Training teaches basic nursing skills through classroom lectures, the practice of skills in a fully equipped nursing laboratory, and clinical placements in healthcare settings. Successful completion of this course will allows students to take the state certification examination. Clinical experiences are scheduled days, evenings, and weekends following successful completion of the lecture and laboratory components. Prerequisite: To be eligible to take this course, students must have a high school diploma or GED. Four hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week and 30 clinical practicum hours following successful completion of didactic instruction. Instructional Support Fee applies 6 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

6
Graduates will be able to safely perform the following patient care activities:
  1. All activities of daily living.
  2. Accurate monitoring and documenting of vital signs.
  3. Safely transfer, move, and position patients.
  4. Monitor nutritional intake and use acceptable feeding techniques.
  5. Monitor skin integrity.
  6. Recognize and report client’s spiritual needs.
  7. Perform CPR and First Aid.
  8. Provide respectful end of life care.

HLT 115 : Personal and Community Health

This course helps the student develop standards and principles of good health for the adult based on scientific research. It provides for study in attitudes and practices as they influence effective living, common adult health problems, significant diseases and public health responsibilities, community health and services, and special problems of concern in the area of community health to a democratic society. Prerequisite: A passing score on the College's reading and English placement tests or concurrent enrollment in ENG 092. Competency Met: Critical Thinking. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring, Summer

Credits

3
1. Define health as a multi-dimensional concept. 2. Assess personal and community levels of health and wellness. 3. Compare the role of prevention with the role of treatment in promoting health and wellness. 4. Determine the impact of healthy lifestyle choices in the areas of mental, emotional, social, physical, occupational, and spiritual health and wellness. 5. Identify common adult health problems, current screening recommendations and treatment modalities. 6. Recognize major public health issues impacting individuals and communities and the role of the social determinants of health in creating health care disparities. 7. Examine how CAM (Complementary and Alternative Medicine) and Integrative Care approaches contrast and complement the traditional health care model. 8. Analyze personal and community health by applying scientific principles, health information literacy skills and behavioral health change theory to develop informed health care choices.

HLT 116 : Introduction to Healthcare

This course addresses the core competencies needed by all healthcare students regardless of the healthcare field they plan to pursue. Topics common to all healthcare professionals include current healthcare systems and trends, communication, infection control, environmental safety, ethical and legal responsibilities, control of healthcare costs, and professionalism in the workplace. Three lecture hours per week. 3 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
1. Discuss the various health care professionals in the current health care delivery system. 2. Describe level of educational methods of credentials and licensing requirements of health care professions. 3. Describe the current health care systems and their trends. 4. Summarize the professional standards as they apply to hygiene, dress, language, confidentiality, and behavior. 5. Identify the rights and responsibilities of being a health care professional. 6. Understand religious and cultural values as they impact healthcare. 7. Describe legal and ethical responsibilities affecting the practice of health care professionals. 8. Recognize the principles of Infection Control, Environmental Safety and Emergency Preparedness. 9. Discuss the principles of healthy lifestyle management for patients and the health care worker. 10. Discuss the roles of the health care worker in controlling health care costs. 11. Identify records and files common to the healthcare setting. 12. Recognize technology applications in healthcare. 13. Recognize that to pursue a career in health care, students should think critically, and communicate effectively. 14. Recognize that quality health care depends on the ability to work well with others, and develop characteristics of an effective team member.

HLT 118 : Fundamentals of Electrocardiography

This competency-based course introduces students to the field of electrocardiography. Topics include the anatomy and physiology of cardiovascular system, equipment maintenance, patient preparation and education, identification of arrhythmias, performing a 12-lead EKG, and specialized procedures such as exercise electrocardiography, and ambulatory electrocardiography event monitoring. At the completion of this course students will be able to sit for a national EKG certification examination. Prerequisite(s): ENG 101, HLT 106, BIO 115, or BIO 233 and BIO 234. Pre or co-requisite: HLT 116 ( or permission of the Program Coordinator for graduates of a direct patient care program.) Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 4 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

4
Upon successful completion of this course, the students will be able to: 1. Describe the cardiac cycle and the conduction systems that controls the cardiac cycle 2. Identify the basic equipment /supplies, quality control, and standard precautions required for electrocardiography 3. Demonstrate patient assessment, preparation, lead placement, EKG acquisition and charting 4. Recognize common dysrhythmias, loose leads, interference, and other malfunctions 5. Maintain equipment for safety and accuracy 6. Demonstrate patient preparation and education for ambulatory monitoring 7. Demonstrate patient preparation and education for exercise electrocardiography 8. Recognize and respond to emergencies

HLT 124 : Basic Pharmacology for Health Sciences

This course is designed to familiarize the student with basic medications administered and prescribed in the modern medical office. Students will learn basic pharmacology and dosage calculations for administering routine medications. Topics will include terminology, definitions, abbreviations, drug classification, prescription and drug forms. Common drugs used, actions, side effects and adverse drug reactions, an overview of immunizations and common emergency drugs will be introduced. Prerequisite: BIO 115 or BIO 154; pre-or co-requisite: BIO 234. Three lecture hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 3 credits Spring, Summer

Credits

3
  1. Implement safety measures and adhere to drug regulations when handling medications.
  2. Understand terminology and abbreviations used in pharmacology.
  3. Recognize the various classifications and usages of medications.
  4. State the purpose of and mode of action of the various categories of drugs.
  5. Discuss the side and adverse effects of the most common drugs.
  6. State the rules of various routes of drug administration.
  7. Initiate patient education regarding drug specifics.
  8. Compute drug dosages accurately using the metric system.
  9. List emergency drugs found in an emergency box.
1
  1. Define drug abuse and ramifications.
11. Name the vaccines used across the life span.

HLT 144 : Pharmacy Technician I

The course includes an orientation to the role and working environment of the pharmacy technician in inpatient and outpatient settings; the legal responsibilities and technical activities and skills of the pharmacy technician; introduction to the pharmaceutical sciences and functions of a pharmacy technician in healthcare; role of the pharmacy technician, areas of specialization in field, technical standards, state registration requirements and employment opportunities, and preparation for Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB) certification exam. In addition to the onsite laboratory instruction students must successfully demonstrate entry level skills of the pharmacy technician during a 30 hour clinical supervised by a pharmacist. Five hours of lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Instructional Support Fee applies. 8 credits Fall

Credits

8
Student acquisition of knowledge and skills described above will be assessed through objective examinations aligned with competency areas of the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board (PTCB), practical examinations of psychomotor skills, and assessment of the student performance at clinical site rotation under supervision of a pharmacist. Students will be eligible to take the national certificate examination (PTCB).

HLT 162 : Selected Topics in Health Sciences

A one-semester course on a specific topic or a health/medical specialty in the Health Sciences. Course topics will be announced each semester. Prerequisite: to be determined by the course specialty offered. Three to six hours of lecture, and/or two to four hours of laboratory as specialty requires. Instructional Support Fee applies. 3-6 credits Fall, Spring

Credits

3
  1. Describe operating room techniques.
  2. Define asepsis.
  3. Describe general surgical procedure used in ophthalmology, ear/nose/throat, dental/oral/maxilla-facial, plastic, reconstructive, obstetrics, gynecology, and orthopedic surgeries.
  4. Identify and describe ethical concepts relevant to surgical procedures.
  5. Demonstrate proper sterilization and aseptic procedures.
  6. Identify common instruments used in general surgical procedures.
  7. Describe operating room set-up procedure and patient preparation.
  8. Take patient vital signs.
  9. Monitor patient vital signs and describe normal ranges during surgeries.