Clinical Laboratory Science

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

MED 101 : Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Science

This course explores the nature and scope of clinical laboratory work. The primary focus is the role of the laboratory in the delivery of health care in various settings, emphasizing types of health care facilities, regulatory agencies affecting laboratory operations, responsibilities, duties and professional conduct expected of clinical laboratory technicians, standard precautions, safety in the laboratory, laboratory mathematics and quality assessment, and medical terminology and procurement of blood specimens. A phlebotomy workshop develops the fundamental skills required to procure and prepare blood specimens for testing. A field trip will be scheduled to a clinical laboratory. Three hours of lecture per week. Fall

Credits

3

Prerequisites

CLS and Phlebotomy students only.

  1. Discuss the history of Clinical Laboratory Science to present day.
  2. Describe the role of the laboratory in health care delivery.
  3. Discuss the hospital and laboratory organizational structure.
  4. Discuss the impact of regulatory agencies and legislation on laboratory operations.
  5. Discuss professionalism and the appropriate ethical conduct required to work in a clinical setting and in the delivery of health care to the diverse ethnic population in the service area.
  6. Discuss the duties and responsibilities of phlebotomists and clinical laboratory technicians in the various types of laboratory and healthcare facilities.
  7. Communicate appropriately using proper medical and laboratory terminology.
  8. Discuss and utilize standard safety practices as outlined by OSHA and CDC.
  9. Describe the type of computer applications used in laboratory information system.
  10. Utilize the basic concepts of laboratory mathematics inclusive of Systems of Measurement involving metric unit conversion and temperature conversions.
  11. Discuss quality control and quality assurance applications necessary to ensure reliability of test results and equipment.
  12. List venipuncture and micro sampling blood collection equipment including the tube additives and color-coding system.
  13. List the steps of both the venipuncture and micro sampling procedures.
  14. Prepare materials and supplies for blood collection.
  15. Perform successful venipuncture on the training arms.
  16. Describe the preparation of blood specimen for testing.
  17. Follow the program safety policies in the CLS classroom.
  18. Prepare a written report approved by the instructor using LRC references and internet sources.
  19. Work cooperatively with fellow students.

MED 102 : Urinalysis

This course consists of integrated instruction between the College and an affiliated hospital laboratory. The principles and procedures of the routine urinalysis will be studied as well as the normal and abnormal physiological functions of the renal system. Two hours lecture and two hours lab per week. At the end of the semester students will spend one week (30 hours) in an affiliated laboratory. Spring

Credits

3

Prerequisites

MED 101, BIO 154, CHM 115 all with a grade of C or better.

Corequisites

  1. Perform, interpret and analyze laboratory tests.
  2. List procedure, principle and normal values for specified laboratory tests.
  3. Recognize abnormal results and describe corrective action.
  4. Accurately perform specimen dilutions when necessary and include appropriate calculations when determining specimen results.
  5. Apply routine and specialized calculations.
  6. Discuss clinical significance of urinalysis and body fluid testing.
  7. Discuss professionalism and the appropriate ethical conduct required to work in a clinical setting and in the delivery of health care to the diverse ethnic population in the service area.
  8. Communicate appropriately using proper medical and laboratory terminology.
  9. Discuss and utilize standard safety practices as outlined by OSHA and CDC.
  10. Apply concepts of instrumentation to chemical and physical analysis of urine and body fluids.
  11. Maintain patient confidentiality.
  12. Discuss and interpret quality control and quality assurance applications necessary to ensure reliability of test results and equipment
  13. Prepare materials and supplies for laboratory testing.
  14. Describe collection, appropriateness and preparation of specimens for testing.
  15. Follow the program safety policies in the CLS laboratory.
  16. Work cooperatively with fellow students, instructors and college staff.

MED 200 : Hematology

This course consists of integrated instruction between the College and an affiliate hospital laboratory. The theory and practice of routine hematology is studied. Topics include the collection and handling of clinical specimens, the origin, development, and function of human blood cells in health and disease, hemostasis and coagulation, automation, computerization, and quality control. Routine hematology and coagulation testing is emphasized. This course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of teaching laboratory to be completed at the College during the first half of the fall semester, and 120 hours of clinical laboratory experience at an affiliate hospital laboratory and 6 hours of clinical seminar at the College during the second half of the semester. Fall

Credits

5

Prerequisites

MED 102, BIO 239, CHM 116, and MTH 119 all with a grade of C or better.

  1. Perform, interpret and analyze routine hematology and coagulation testing including manual push smears and stains, manual differentials, automated complete blood counts, manual cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, manual coagulation testing and automated coagulation testing.
  2. List procedure, principle and normal values for specified laboratory tests.
  3. Recognize abnormal results and describe corrective action.
  4. Apply routine hematology calculations.
  5. Discuss clinical significance of hematology testing and its relation to disorders of the blood and body fluids including; erythrocyte abnormalities, leukocyte abnormalities, platelet abnormalities, bone marrow dysfunction, genetic disorders, microorganisms, tumors and coagulation disorders.
  6. Discuss professionalism and the appropriate ethical conduct required to work in a clinical setting and in the delivery of health care to the diverse ethnic population in the service area.
  7. Communicate appropriately using proper medical and laboratory terminology.
  8. Discuss and utilize standard safety practices as outlined by OSHA and CDC.
  9. Apply concepts of instrumentation to hematology analysis.
  10. Maintain patient confidentiality.
  11. Discuss and interpret quality control and quality assurance applications necessary to ensure reliability of test results and equipment.
  12. Prepare materials and supplies for laboratory testing.
  13. Describe collection, appropriateness and preparation of specimens for testing.
  14. Follow the program safety policies in the CLS laboratory.
  15. Work cooperatively with fellow students, instructors and college staff.

MED 205 : Immunology - Serology

The course introduces theoretical principles of immunology which involve the structure, function and interactions of the immune system. The serological techniques useful in the diagnosis of many diseases will be reviewed and performed at the College. This course includes 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of laboratory. Fall

Credits

4

Prerequisites

CHM 116, BIO 239, MED 102 and MTH 119 all with a grade of C or better.

  1. Perform, interpret and analyze routine immunology testing including; phagocytosis, slide agglutination testing and Enzyme Linked Immunoassay (ELISA) testing.
  2. List procedure, principle and normal values for specified laboratory tests.
  3. Recognize abnormal results and describe corrective action.
  4. Discuss clinical significance of immunology testing and its relation to disorders of the body including immune disorders, microbial infections, viruses and parasites.
  5. Discuss professionalism and the appropriate ethical conduct required to work in a clinical setting and in the delivery of health care to the diverse ethnic population in the service area.
  6. Communicate appropriately using proper medical and laboratory terminology.
  7. Discuss and utilize standard safety practices as outlined by OSHA and CDC.
  8. Apply concepts of instrumentation to immunology analysis.
  9. Maintain patient confidentiality.
  10. Discuss and interpret quality control and quality assurance applications necessary to ensure reliability of test results and equipment.
  11. Prepare materials and supplies for laboratory testing.
  12. Describe collection, appropriateness and preparation of specimens for testing.
  13. Follow the program safety policies in the CLS laboratory.
  14. Describe collection, appropriateness and preparation of specimens for testing.
  15. Work cooperatively with fellow students, instructors and college staff.

MED 206 : Medical Microbiology I

The course consists of integrated instruction between the College and an affiliated hospital laboratory. This is a comprehensive study of both theory and practical aspects of clinical microbiology. Emphasis is placed on the collection and handling of clinical specimens as well as the primary isolation and identification of the most frequently encountered bacteria pathogenic to humans. Other topics discussed include antimicrobial chemotherapy and host resistance. This course includes 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of teaching laboratory to be completed at the College during the first half of the semester. The clinical laboratory experience consists of 120 hours to be completed at an affiliate hospital laboratory and 6 hours of clinical seminar during the second half of the semester. Fall

Credits

6

Prerequisites

BIO 239, CHM 116, MED 102, and MTH 119 ) all with a grade of C or better.

  1. Describe the fundamentals of specimen collection including distinguishing between acceptable and unacceptable specimens, transportation, storage and processing.
  2. Culture specimens from different body sites accounting for atmosphere, pH, temperature and nutritional requirements.
  3. Examine clinical specimen growth using gram stain, biochemical testing and serology to identify commonly encountered organisms.
  4. Describe the steps involved in culture workup and interpretation including appropriate media and growth requirements.
  5. Use judgment to analyze test results to identify pathogen and normal flora.
  6. Demonstrate the ability to recognize technical problems and suggest possible corrective actions.
  7. Evaluate the methods of identifying Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Neisseria, Hemophilus, Enterobacteriaceae, fastidious and non-fermenting gram negative and gram positive bacilli.
  8. Discuss disease states associated with microorganisms studied.
  9. Describe the mechanism of action of different antimicrobials and their targets of action.
  10. Follow the program safety policies in the CLS laboratory.
  11. Maintain patient confidentiality.
  12. Discuss professionalism and the appropriate ethical conduct required to work in a clinical setting and in the delivery of health care to the diverse ethnic population in the service area.
  13. Work cooperatively with fellow students, instructors and college staff.

MED 215 : Immunohematology

The course consists of integrated instruction between the College and an affiliated hospital laboratory. Emphasis is placed on the genetic basis and immunological interaction of the major blood group antigens and antibodies. Topics will include compatibility testing, antibody screen and identification techniques, blood donations and transfusion therapy, record keeping and quality control techniques. This course includes 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of teaching laboratory to be completed at the College during the first half of the spring semester and 120 hours of clinical laboratory experience at an affiliate hospital laboratory and 6 hours of clinical seminar at the College during the second half of the semester. Spring

Credits

5

Prerequisites

MED 205 with a grade of C or better.

  1. Discuss the history of blood transfusion services, the major contributors, recent advantages and trends.
  2. Discuss the basic theories of human genetics and apply them to major blood groups.
  3. Correlate population genetics and antigen frequency differences within indigenous groups and apply this knowledge to compatibility testing and the application of DNA probing to parentage testing and forensic science.
  4. Discuss the basic theories of innate and acquired immunity and their relationships to immunohematology.
  5. Perform routine serological procedures inclusive of ABO grouping, Rh typing, compatibility testing, antibody detection and identification, solving of ABO discrepancies, Rh typing and antibody identification problems.
  6. Demonstrate and apply knowledge of the Rh, Lewis, Kell, Duffy, MNS, P, I, Kidd and Lutheran blood group systems.
  7. Follow universal/standard precautions, OSHA safety policies and CDC recommendations in the performance of assigned tasks.
  8. Discuss the regulatory process and its special impact on the blood bank industry.
  9. Summarize the principles and methods of enzyme treatment, neutralizations, lectins and elutions.
  10. Discuss the acceptability of a donor in accordance with AABB standards for whole blood and component donations.
  11. Describe the transfusion process and identify patient risks and potential adverse reactions of transfusion.
  12. Discuss the types of blood components that are available for transfusion therapy including collection, preparation, storage and appropriate use of each component.
  13. Compare serological and clinical characteristics of immune hemolytic anemia.
  14. Describe the quality control and the record keeping processes for donors and recipients.
  15. Identify and describe current testing for transfusion transmitted diseases.

MED 216 : Medical Microbiology II

This course is a continuation of MED 206. The micro-organisms studied are those which require specialized techniques in both collection and identification. These pathogens include those organisms belonging to the following groups: anaerobic bacteria, mycobacteria, fungi and parasites. Many of the diseases caused by these organisms produce chronic infections that have plagued humanity. Society and traditional social behaviors are explored as they relate to health and disease progression across the globe. This course includes 45 hours of lecture and 45 hours of teaching laboratory at the College. Competency met: Global Awareness (5.2) Spring

Credits

4

Prerequisites

MED 206 with a grade of C or better.

  1. Name the anaerobic bacteria, fungal organisms, mycobacteria and parasites commonly involved in human infections.
  2. Describe the infections caused by these organisms and the methods used to prevent and treat the infections.
  3. Identify world and historical issues caused by these organisms.
  4. Describe the fundamentals of specimen collection including distinguishing between acceptable and unacceptable specimens, transportation, storage and processing.
  5. Culture the organisms listed accounting for atmosphere, pH, temperature and nutritional requirements.
  6. Examine specimen growth using stain techniques, biochemical testing and serology for identification.
  7. Identify organisms based on case study information, microscopic and macroscopic appearance and biochemical characteristics.
  8. Demonstrate the ability to recognize technical problems and suggest possible corrective actions.
  9. Apply the principles of Quality Control Procedures.
  10. Follow appropriate safety precautions while working in the laboratory.
  11. Work cooperatively with fellow students, instructors and college staff.

MED 217 : Clinical Biochemistry

The course consists of integrated instruction between the College and affiliate hospital laboratory. The primary focus of the course is the biochemical analysis of blood and body fluids in health and disease. Topics include routine manual and automated testing methods, electrophoreses, safety practices and quality control. The course includes 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of teaching laboratory to be completed at the College during the first half of the semester, and 120 hours of clinical laboratory experience at an affiliate hospital laboratory and 6 hours of clinical seminar at the College during the second half of the semester. Spring

Credits

6

Prerequisites

MED 200 with a grade of C or better.

  1. List procedure, principle and normal values for specified laboratory tests.
  2. Describe collection, appropriateness and preparation of specimens for testing.
  3. Prepare materials and supplies and perform, interpret and analyze laboratory tests commonly performed in a clinical chemistry laboratory.
  4. Discuss and interpret quality control and quality assurance applications necessary to ensure reliability of test results and equipment.
  5. Apply concepts of instrumentation to chemical analysis.
  6. Recognize abnormal results and describe corrective action.
  7. Accurately perform specimen dilutions when necessary and include appropriateĀ calculations when determining specimen results.
  8. Discuss clinical significance of chemistry testing.
  9. Follow the program safety policies in the CLS classroom.
  10. Communicate appropriately using proper medical and laboratory terminology.
  11. Maintain patient confidentiality.
  12. Work cooperatively with fellow students, instructors and college staff.

MED 218 : Selected Topics in Clinical Laboratory Science

This course offers students an opportunity to study a specific topic in Clinical Laboratory Science. Course topics are announced each semester. One to three class hours per week. 1- Not offered each year.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

to be determined by the course offered.

  1. Identify the micro-anatomical features of the major body organs.
  2. Describe the processing and handling of surgical and autopsy specimens.
  3. Discuss the process of gross evaluation of tissues.
  4. List and describe the steps involved in tissue processing including: fixations and embedding techniques.
  5. Describe the procedures required to prepare and adequately fix tissue blocks including decalcification.
  6. List the steps involved in tissue sectioning by microtomy and the production of a paraffin section.
  7. Describe the procedure for preparation of a frozen section for microscopic evaluation.
  8. List the instrument used in the histology department.
  9. List and describe routine and special stains and techniques.
  10. List and describe the steps of the Hematoxylin and Eosin staining technique to produce a coverslipped section suitable for microscopic evaluation.
  11. Describe the immunohistochemistry and molecular applications currently used in the diagnosis of malignancy.
  12. Discuss microwave technology applications in tissue evaluation.
  13. Describe the procedure used to detect amyloid substances.
  14. Describe the safety procedures necessary to comply with OSHA regulations.
  15. List and discuss quality assurance and quality control procedures necessary to ensure accuracy and precision in the performance of histological techniques procedures.